Fixing Delilah

Fixing Delilah

by Sarah Ockler

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940156817856
Publisher: Sarah Ockler
Publication date: 10/31/2016
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 944,599
File size: 786 KB

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Fixing Delilah 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 58 reviews.
Lauren817 More than 1 year ago
Ever since Sarah's promising YA debut with Twenty Boy Summer, I have been eager to read more of her books. Therefore, when Fixing Delilah landed in my hands a few weeks ago, I was excited beyond words. Thankfully enough it was everything I wished it would be and more. Because not only did I find the characters to be lovable and the writing and world building tight and well done, but its story was one that truly hit a chord in me. Fixing Delilah tells the story of Delilah Hannaford, a girl who used to have it all together: perfect grades, friends she liked, and more. However, as of lately, everything has begun to fall apart. Her mom's lost trust her, her boyfriend is more of a hook-up friend than anything else, and her plans for the future are looking quite bleak. After a family tragedy, Delilah and her mother are off to Vermont to pick up the pieces, and while Delilah's mother thinks this will be a brand new beginning for Delilah, Delilah thinks it will be nothing more than a bore of a summer. Nevertheless, when Delilah arrives in Vermont she is pleasantly surprised because not only does she reunite with her childhood friend Patrick but also she falls into some family secrets like no other. Now with an old diary and new found friends, Violet is off to figure out what happened to her family all those years ago, but will she find out more than she expected? Moreover, what happens when a friendship turns into something more? Only time and more pages can tell in this story of one crazy summer like no other. Delilah was simply the perfect lead character for this. Witty, confused, and full of spunk, she is one girl you cannot help but root for as she comes to peace with the past and makes her way to the future. However, best of all she always felt real to me so to say because while she was one girl who made mistakes, she still managed to not only learn from them (even if it did take a while) but she always remains this compassionate and full of heart girl. Nevertheless, what I liked most of this book was not Delilah directly but the relationships that were present. There was the one between Delilah and Patrick, which was as sweet as candy, but also full of problems and issues that always had me to curious to see what would happen between them. Then there was the one between Delilah and her mother. While it was rocky and full of angst, it worked perfectly in the way both came to understand and appreciate the other as time went on. Lastly there was the one general one between family and like most one's it was complicated beyond relief but how Sarah allowed Delilah to put all the pieces back together so to say truly made this book the amazing thing it was. Adding to this all, I loved Sarah Ockler's writing. Because not only did it paint such a vivid scene in my head with the characters and setting, but it truly was the backbone of the novel, carrying it and making it full of twists and turns that constantly left me eager to read more, more, more. In all, Sarah Ockler truly has something special in Fixing Delilah, which gives me even more reason to suggest that YOU should pick it up ASAP. Grade: A+
Susan Duval More than 1 year ago
This book is the best book i have ever read. I am soo glad that i gave it a chance and read it. This book will be the book i come back for inspiration (next to The Bible). I didn't expect this book to have an affect on me. It has taught me soo much about family and friends. I also didn't expect it to be better than Sarah Dessen books but Sarah Ockler has topped her more than i expected. I will love this book always and it will change the way i think about family and about the friends i choose. So i want to end this by thanking the author for writing such a life-changing, heartfealt, warm story. Thank you Sarah Ockler. :) P.S. AUTHORS NAMED SARAH ARE AWESOME WRITERS!!!!! THANK YOU SARAH DESSEN AND SARAH OCKLER FOR BEING SOOO AWESOME!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When reading this book, I felt like it would be another book with another clique kind of plot line and ending. I was right for the most part. But there was something there in the characters that separated this book from most of the clique teen love novels - there were surprises that came out of no where. Some were very well predictable, others, not so much. I enjoyed reading it and was always on my toes. Recommend to those fans of Sarah Dessen, but are ready for a few twists.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brilliant.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved the part in the car when he screams I'm in love with you!!! LOVED THIS BOOK AND ITS ROMANCE!!
uponalovestory More than 1 year ago
Well to start I didn't just love this book I LOVED it!! Yes that is loved in all caps which indicates I liked it a lot. I recently read Bittersweet by Sarah Ockler and after reading it I knew that I wanted to read other novels the author had written. This book was so much more than I expected it to be. First we have Delilah who is your normal teenage girl sneaking out of the house to meet her non-boyfriend and fighting with her mother who is a workaholic. But then Delilah's grandmother passes away and she has to travel to Vermont with her mother to help get her grandmother's house in order. Growing up Delilah spent every summer at her grandparents house until 8 years ago when her grandfather passed away and she was not allowed to return. She is unsure about seeing a certain person again, her old childhood friend Patrick or as she used to refer to him "Little Ricky". Patrick spends his days helping his father to fix Delilah's grandmothers house shirtless I might add. What's not to like right? He spends his nights playing guitar and singing at the local coffee shop. But Delilah soon finds out that her family has secrets and she wants to get to the bottom of it all. There were so many twist and turns in this book. So many things that shocked me and took me by surprise. Who doesn't like reading about family secrets? More importantly who doesn't like reading about a total swoon worthy love interest with a guitar? I would highly recommend you pick up this book! I would especially recommend it to fans of Sarah Dessen novels. It had the same sort of feel for me. So pick it up and get ready to swoon.
Tori Hanna More than 1 year ago
This book was great! It's a great read and I recommend this book,and Sarah Ockler's previous book Twenty Boy Summer, to any teenager!! Fixing Delilah is my new fav book :) You will fall in love with the characters and the book its self! !! Definitely a MUST READ :)
Nikkayme More than 1 year ago
It's official. I am in love with Sarah Ockler's words. She could write about caterpillars or bunnies or the most boring day in history, and I'm positive I would still love it. This quote describes my feelings perfectly: He belts it straight out, his voice like milk and honey and everything rich and warm and good. I want to drink it. To take off my clothes and slip into his music like a hot bubble bath. ~ pg. 111 That is how I feel about Sarah's writing The story starts off slow and kind of simmers, but it works. Fixing Delilah is one of those sweet, summer romance stories with a hell of a lot of family drama thrown in. It's very character-driven and internal. We're introduced to Delilah Hannaford, on the cusp of a summer in Vermont. Leaving her home and her non-boyfriend behind isn't really a big deal, but staying with her mother for an entire summer, cleaning up the home of her deceased grandmother, and digging up long buried family secrets, is. Delilah is so much like every teen girl out there. She's angry and emotional - desperate for attention, but not sure how to get it. She wants her mother to love her like she used to. Back before her Papa died and her family fell apart. Her life is a series of mistakes that allow her to forget how much she's hurting, but this one summer changes that. The Hannaford family secrets are revealed slowly, layer by layer. It's like wiping away a film of dust, just to find a box that needs to be unlocked. I loved the dynamic between Delilah, her mother Claire, and her aunt Rachel. These three Hannaford women are all strong-willed in their own way and flawed, but they so clearly want to be able to love each other the way they used to; they just don't know how. Getting to know each of them was a pleasure, as was slowly discovering the secrets that once tore them apart. During all this family strife, Delilah gets reacquainted with her best summer friend from her childhood. The boy who used to be Little Ricky, is now Patrick and Patrick is a swoon machine. His good-natured joking, handyman skills, and his musical endeavors made me adore him. He has all this going for him and to top it all off, he cares so much for Delilah. Their friendship does this thing, this crazy thing that many YA books disregard, it blossoms. That's right. No insta-love here, just some flirting, almost kisses, and finally we get there. And I love there. Fixing Delilah is the perfect blend of a family, love, and growing up - it made me laugh, it made me ache, it had me sighing and swooning, and most importantly, it made me love it. Delilah Hannaford found a way into my heart and forced me to care for her and her entire family. It's a story that reminds us that every mistake, every action, every memory, makes us who we are and despite all of that, there will always be someone there who cares. Opening line: "Claire? It's Rachel. I'm afraid I have some bad news." ~ pg. 1 Favorite lines: I dug up the past and sifted through the rubble and counted all the bones, and now I want to throw them all back in the hole under shovels full of earth. To forget. ~ pgs. 231-232
Laura Andrea Martinez More than 1 year ago
i have read saah ocklers other book-twenty boy summer and i absolutely loved it! it was filled with romance,sadness,happiness,and friendship. i finished it and dtarted it over again that same instant! You will trly be able t put yourself in amna-themain characters-shoes by the way the author puts in so much emotion! this isone of my all time favorite books and believe me i have read ALOT of books! all teens and mybepeople older than a teenager will fall in love wih this book, i would know because i am thirteen. read both her books and enjoy thrm for they truly are AMAZING!
Linda-Mai-Ellen More than 1 year ago
Review: The main characters seemed so real to me and the setting couldn't be better. A lot is left unsaid between the Hannafords, but when secrets are revealed, they will catch you by surprise. There are moments of joy and laughter, and there are moments of sadness and sorrow. I think the author did a great job of capturing what it feels like to be a teen as Hannah wonders about what could have been and as she is discovering herself. A multitude of emotions are experienced, and sometimes, a storm can surface and wreck havoc to then be followed by sunshine and blue skies. Although a couple of scenes are rather clichés (which story doesn't have these? they work for a reason,) there are powerful scenes in the book that can move you to tears or leave a lasting impression. I'd recommended this book to YA readers, especially those who enjoy contemporary fiction. There's a good dose of family drama, romance, mystery, and friendship. This story felt like it was told with a true teenage voice where the pacing is just great.
lisagibson on LibraryThing 3 months ago
I loved Ms. Ockler's previous book, TWENTY BOY SUMMER. I was sure I'd love this one too. This book was about family. Familial bonds - both the severing of them and the strengthing of them. It was full of beautiful writing that made me laugh and brought tears to my eyes at times as well. Family is a factor that helps to mold who we are in this world. We can sometimes come to define ourselves through family. It certainly does not completely make you who you are, but can be a piece in the puzzle. When some of the pieces are missing or hidden, it can be more difficult to see that picture of who you are.Delilah Hannaford is on a mission to find as many of those pieces as she can. My favorite line from this book was, "Now several promotions later, buying a new bottle of perfume is just another errand on her assistant's long list, and Coco Chanel is the smell of nothing but a woman leaving; a door clicked closed after a casual "don't wait up - I'll probably be late again tonight." I particularly love the portion 'Coco Chanel is the smell of nothing but a woman leaving'. It says so much.I urge girsl to read this book and share with their mothers, sisters, aunts and any other women you can think of. Another gorgeous book by Sarah Ockler. I'm giving his lovely book 5 kisses!
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Delilah's family has lots of secrets. She lives with her hard-working executive single mom, and has a tendency to trouble. When her grandmother dies and she, her mother and her aunt return to the family home in Vermont, Delilah is curious as to why there was no contact between them for the last 8 years.
nizmart on LibraryThing 3 months ago
What a great book, I loved the characters and I found myself rooting for them. The entire time I was reading this book I felt like I was watching a "Sweet Home Alabama" type film (which I loved). Delilah has made mistakes in her life, but she still comes across as a genuinely good person who knows what it right and what is wrong. It doesn't take her long to realize what kind of relationship her and her "non-boyfriend" have and why she even keeps him around, she is a smart gal. Patrick, or Little Ricky, as she used to know him is the sweetest, cutest, talented guy I've read about in a while. He has his own problems to deal with, but he is always there for Delilah when she needs him, no questions asked. Another character I really liked was Delilah's aunt Rachel. She always wears funky t-shirts and burns incense, oh and she buys soy bacon! (I'm a vegetarian, can you blame me for liking her?) The infamous "fight 8 years ago" turns out to be a pretty big deal, I can see why Delilah's mom never discussed it with her, even so I think she waited too long to do so. After that, the ending was lovely, peaceful, and optimistic. I have to say, this is the first stand alone YA book I've read in a long while. It was difficult to say goodbye to the characters, but I know they'll be okay :) This book made me cry, laugh, and I felt as if I were healing with them. I love when a book can do all that, it makes it a keeper for sure. Oh and I couldn't help but finish it in one sitting so... 5 stars!
stephxsu on LibraryThing 3 months ago
The women of the Hannaford family are a mess. Delilah has been getting into trouble with shoplifting and her sort-of boyfriend. Her single mother, Claire, acts like the perfectly poised woman while she refuses to discuss her familial issues. And neither Claire nor Delilah¿s aunt, Rachel, will talk about their youngest sister who died before Delilah was born. And now here they are, spending the summer in Vermont cleaning out Delilah¿s late grandmother¿s house, the grandmother she hadn¿t talked to since the fight between her grandmother and mother eight years ago.In between cleaning the house, family secrets, fights, and new friendships and (possibly even) romance, Delilah and the other Hannaford women learn the true value of familial bonds.FIXING DELILAH, Sarah Ockler¿s sophomore novel, was in my opinion not quite as strong as her debut novel Twenty Boy Summer, but is still a solid contemporary read that will especially touch the hearts of those who enjoy their contemporary YAs with a strong dose of familial angst and growth.The strongest element of this book is its dealings with the emotional subtleties and complexities that occur in familial relationships. FIXING DELILAH contains the amount of misinterpreted exchanges, conversational avoidances, and shocking secrets that one usually expects from a family-oriented TV drama. Delilah is acting out against her rigid, talking-averse mother, and conflicts resolve in tearful revelations at the end, etc. These types of family conflicts are not really new in YA contemporary lit, but they still make for a decent read.Delilah¿s budding romance with a childhood friend feels rather idealistic for my taste, but is nevertheless charming, especially probably for younger readers who are just being introduced to the great wide world of YA contemporary reads. FIXING DELILAH does a decent job of portraying the long process of healing for a familial drowning in resentment and guilt, even if I feel like it accomplishes this with tried-and-true contemporary character types.
ilikethesebooks on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Where to start¿ Picking up this book I was expecting a great story, but I was not expecting anything near the excellence of what I read. This is one of the few young adult books that have ever made look past the obvious ink on the pages and the meaning that those words hold for the characters. Their pain, their secrets, their relationships (and unrelationships), their laughter and their fights all became words written for me. I have not lived Delilah¿s life; I have not suffered the way she has, but I still read those words with a realization that within these chapters, there was a lesson for me to learn as well.The story takes place the summer of Delilah¿s grandmother¿s death. Back in Vermont, life seems to pick up where it left off eight years ago at her grandfather¿s funeral. The funeral that stopped Delilah¿s yearly summertime visits, the funeral that changed everything. The only problem is that Delilah has no idea what happened that day. She begins to see that she is not the only one with secrets and actions that need to be explained. Her family is hiding a generation of Hannaford secrets, secrets that would fill in the missing links of her life. Secrets that are too painful to be retold.One their first day back, Delilah reunites with her summertime best friend, little Ricky- Patrick now, and like everything else, their relationship picks up right were they left it. Except now their friendship is burdened with the complications of death, secrets and adolescence. Then the inevitable happens. The secrets that her family tried so hard to keep from her begin to unravel. With each new detail of her family¿s history, a little piece of Delilah threatens to break. Delilah cracks with the tension each of her new questions instigates.When the pressure becomes too much to bear, her anger and frustration is projected onto the people she loves. Delilah finds herself playing what if? What if she did this. What if that didn¿t do that. She constantly dwells on what could have been and what could be. But there is one thing Delilah knows, she knows that more than anything she wishes she didn¿t push her loved ones away. What if she can¿t get them back? And what if she can¿t get herself back.Fixing Delilah made me think about my life and how I treat the people I love. I was distressed to find out that I was doing exactly what Delilah was. Projecting anger I was feeling towards myself and towards things I do not have the power to change on my loved ones - specifically my mother. Much like Claire Hannaford, my mother¿s whole life is erratically affected by her work. Constantly tending to ringing phones, beeping emails and trying to appease her frantic clients. Like Delilah, it drives me insane. Why can¿t she be there to bagger me about grades or yell at me to turn the music down? I reacted the same way Delilah does, by pushing her away. The tears started to fall when Delilah epiphany arises. This could be her in a few decades - going through the possessions of her dead mother whom she hasn¿t spoken a word to in eight years. Delilah¿s realization struck a cord deep in my heart. That could be me too, and I do not want to be sitting there playing what if?Sarah Ockler, author of Twenty Boy Summer, delivers a remarkable, utterly consuming story that is hilarious at times, heartwarming at others and heartrending as well. I opened the cover to read the first words and hours later I was sitting unmoved staring at the last page. I found myself crying, then laughing through my blurred vision with the much-needed comic relief provided by Patrick or the best-friend-we-all-wish-we-could-have Emily. I would recommend this story to anyone thirteen and up, especially children transitioning into adolescence. This story provided me with the much-needed ¿bigger picture¿ that I failed to see before. I am walking away from this book enlightened, something I did expect to happen. Then again, the greatest things in life are unexpected, right?
bookwormygirl on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Delilah Hannaford is a good girl. But something is wrong with her. As of late she's been getting into all sorts of trouble. She was recently caught (accidentally) stealing lipstick, her grades have dropped and she's no longer part of the school blog, she's been sneaking around with her "not-boyfriend" Finn, and she's been lying to her mother. When they receive the news that Delilah's grandmother has passed away, her mother feels that a summer away from home might be what Delilah needs to get back on the right track.So off they go, to a town that they haven't returned to in over eight years. Hannah knows something big happened the day she and her mother stalked off eight years ago - they've never returned to the home she lived in for the first eight years of her life and her mother and grandmother never talked to each other again. Over the summer, she'll make new friendships, rekindle some old one's, spark an unexpected romance, and try to piece together the grand mystery of her family's painful past. As a big fan of Ms. Ockler's Twenty Boy Summer, I was anxiously awaiting Fixing Delilah (FYI - my ARC was titled Fixing Delilah Hannaford). I found Twenty Boy Summer to be absolutely perfect and I was a bit worried to see how Ms. Ockler was going to pull that off again. Well, I'm happy to say that I need not have worried. Fixing Delilah is just as good, in its own way, of course.I was very sympathetic to Delilah. Although I can't truly say I relate to her, I still felt for her as a character. She has this self-destructive attitude that constantly had her going from one angst-filled situation to the next. Her relationship with her mother, the budding romance with childhood friend, Patrick, and even her new friendship with Emily were all very realistically portrayed. My favorite aspects of the novel were the mystery and secrets surrounding her family. The fight that caused she and her mother to leave their home/town, the untimely death of one of her aunt's, why her grandmother and mother never talked again, even the stressed relationship between her mother and the living aunt. I kept guessing as to what happened and every time I thought I had it, there was another twist in the story. This alone, kept the pages turning for me.In summary, I really liked it! I think Ms. Ockler has written a well-rounded story where she perfectly captures the conflict that can arise within a family when there is dishonesty and secrets kept. It has the perfect blend of romance, mystery and enough family drama to keep you engrossed emotionally.
wenzowsa on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Whenever I read a teen novel, I ask myself, ¿Will my kids enjoy this book? Is there enough drama, tension, romance, and angst in here that they will be able to relate to? Is this a quality book for teens?¿ And, when reading Fixing Delilah Hannaford, I asked myself these same questions. Thankfully, all the questions were answered in the affirmative ¿ this novel is the quintessential great read for adolescents.Our protagonist, Delilah Hannaford, is troubled. She¿s been caught shoplifting, cutting class, and going around with a ¿non-boyfriend¿. The only route to her redemption lies in taking a cathartic family vacation to Maine, and dealing with not only her grandmother¿s death but also unanswered family skeletons. Of course, no summer is complete without a cute boy, so Delilah meets one, and romance ensues. I won¿t give away the ending, but I will say that Delilah becomes more mature as the summer progresses.The author, Sarah Ockler, has written a quality novel. This book is powerful, enticing, and moving. I would recommend it to any young audience, or any adult who has an interest in teen literature.
Nikkayme on LibraryThing 3 months ago
It¿s official. I am in love with Sarah Ockler¿s words. She could write about caterpillars or bunnies or the most boring day in history, and I¿m positive I would still love it. This quote describes my feelings perfectly: He belts it straight out, his voice like milk and honey and everything rich and warm and good. I want to drink it. To take off my clothes and slip into his music like a hot bubble bath. ~ pg. 111That is how I feel about Sarah's writingThe story starts off slow and kind of simmers, but it works. Fixing Delilah is one of those sweet, summer romance stories with a hell of a lot of family drama thrown in. It¿s very character-driven and internal. We¿re introduced to Delilah Hannaford, on the cusp of a summer in Vermont. Leaving her home and her non-boyfriend behind isn¿t really a big deal, but staying with her mother for an entire summer, cleaning up the home of her deceased grandmother, and digging up long buried family secrets, is.Delilah is so much like every teen girl out there. She¿s angry and emotional ¿ desperate for attention, but not sure how to get it. She wants her mother to love her like she used to. Back before her Papa died and her family fell apart. Her life is a series of mistakes that allow her to forget how much she¿s hurting, but this one summer changes that.The Hannaford family secrets are revealed slowly, layer by layer. It¿s like wiping away a film of dust, just to find a box that needs to be unlocked. I loved the dynamic between Delilah, her mother Claire, and her aunt Rachel. These three Hannaford women are all strong-willed in their own way and flawed, but they so clearly want to be able to love each other the way they used to; they just don¿t know how. Getting to know each of them was a pleasure, as was slowly discovering the secrets that once tore them apart.During all this family strife, Delilah gets reacquainted with her best summer friend from her childhood. The boy who used to be Little Ricky, is now Patrick and Patrick is a swoon machine. His good-natured joking, handyman skills, and his musical endeavors made me adore him. He has all this going for him and to top it all off, he cares so much for Delilah. Their friendship does this thing, this crazy thing that many YA books disregard, it blossoms. That¿s right. No insta-love here, just some flirting, almost kisses, and finally we get there. And I love there.Fixing Delilah is the perfect blend of a family, love, and growing up ¿ it made me laugh, it made me ache, it had me sighing and swooning, and most importantly, it made me love it. Delilah Hannaford found a way into my heart and forced me to care for her and her entire family. It¿s a story that reminds us that every mistake, every action, every memory, makes us who we are and despite all of that, there will always be someone there who cares.Opening line: ¿Claire? It¿s Rachel. I¿m afraid I have some bad news.¿ ~ pg. 1Favorite lines: I dug up the past and sifted through the rubble and counted all the bones, and now I want to throw them all back in the hole under shovels full of earth. To forget. ~ pgs. 231-232And here's a taste of Aunt Rachel:¿I¿ll go,¿ Rachel says. ¿Need anything specific? Milk? Toilet paper? Compassion, maybe? I¿ll get a bunch. I probably have a coupon.¿ ~ pg. 25
callmecayce on LibraryThing 3 months ago
I don't know what it was about this book, but it was so good that I kept reading it when I should've been sleeping. It was sad and sweet, but also funny and thoughtful. I hope Sarah Ockler writes lots more books, because between this one and Twenty Boy Summer, she's really got me hooked.
LauraMoore on LibraryThing 3 months ago
I was so happy to find the ARC of this book at my friends of the library sale and I have to say that I really enjoyed it. This book is about a teenage girl named Delilah Hannaford that loses her estranged grandmother and goes to clean out her house with her mom and aunt who she hasn't seen in quite some time. Delilah gets more then she bargains for that summer when reasons for leaving her hometown and family years ago start unfolding and why she hasn't seen or talked to her grandmother and aunt in so long. This is a coming of age novel in where Delilah deals with self discovery but also how secrets and lies can greatly effect a family and her life forever. While this book has pretty serious subject matter there was a soft humor to it that really created a nice balance in the novel. I would definitely recommend to go out and pick this book up.
ericajsc on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Delilah¿s family is full of secrets, and it is her desire to uncover those secrets that I found most intriguing about this story. This is one of those instances where, even though I figured out one of the biggest secrets early on, I wasn¿t scratching my head over the fact that the main character couldn¿t see the truth staring her in the face. Even though Delilah¿s relationship with her mother is strained, and it¿s obvious she¿s hiding something, it seemed that deep down Delilah still idolized her mom and wanted to believe everything she¿d ever told her. But with someone as diligent as Delilah, secrets can¿t stay hidden forever, and the truth can be painful.As for Delilah¿s friendship/romance with Patrick, well, there are definitely some swoony moments. Not only is Patrick hot (and shirtless!), he¿s also understanding of Delilah¿s family struggles ¿ to a point. I like him because he knows she¿s dealing with stuff and doesn¿t run off at the first hint of emotion, but he¿s also not going to just sit there and let her use him. And, okay, sure, I sort of had a problem with the fact that he called her ¿baby¿ way too early after they reconnected after eight years apart, but other than that, their relationship felt perfect, flaws and all.Although there were a few aspects of the story I would¿ve liked to see developed further, overall the story satisfies. Being part of a family isn¿t always easy and sometimes life gets messy, and how a girl deals with those challenges says a lot about her. Delilah makes mistakes, but ultimately she proves to stand strong.
hobbitsies on LibraryThing 3 months ago
First off, let me just say ¿ if you haven¿t read Twenty Boy Summer yet, you need to. Really. I mean, I don¿t think I¿ve ever read a book that made me cry as hard as Twenty Boy Summer. Sarah Ockler is an unbelievably good author and by far one of my favourites. So, of course, I had pretty high expectations for Fixing Delilah.And it lived up to them! Fixing Delilah was great ¿ it¿s beautiful and heartbreaking and hopeful and just really, really good. It didn¿t make me cry nearly as much as Twenty Boy Summer, but it tells an equally powerful story.Sarah Ockler¿s writing and descriptions are just so well-done! I can¿t explain it ¿ there¿s something about the sentence structure and her word choice. They¿re so¿whimsical and epic. I don¿t usually use examples in my reviews, but I just¿have to show what I mean since I can¿t clearly explain. Take a few sentences from the fragment I read in my Fragment Friday -The old place seems only to have changed in relation to me. I¿m bigger. It¿s smaller. I¿m older. It¿s ancient. It¿s still the same color that I remember, but now the paint along the bottom peels down in golden curls like lazy spring daffodils. The shutters are loose and crooked, some open on both sides while otehrs are fully or half-shut, sneaking looks as if after all these years, the house no longer recognizes me. ¿ Fixing Delilah, page 15That¿s only a small snippet but, do you guys get it? I mean, there¿s something about her writing that makes me go, ¿Wow, I want to write like her when I finally get off my butt and write something.¿ Anyway, point is ¿ I¿d give her writing WAY more than 5 stars if I could.I love Delilah. She¿s rebellious and unhappy and confused and she totally reminded me of myself a few years ago, during my rebellious days. I loved her mother and her aunt, and how all three of them fit so well together, despite their numerous differences in personality and opinion. I loved seeing dynamic between the three of them grow and change as the book moved along and as we found out more and more about the Hannaford past.And what¿s a great book without cute guys and kissing? Well, you don¿t need to worry about any lack of cute boys ¿ there¿s always Ricky! And let me tell you, I loved Ricky! I loved that he had a history with Delilah (best summer friends is no joke!) and how well he fit into the story, even though it was a good eight years later.And the plot twist! I so did not see that coming. I knew something would happen, but I had no idea that it would be what it was. The ending is perfect, even though I¿d like to know more about what happens after. Guess I¿m just nosey!As I said, Fixing Delilah didn¿t make me cry as hard as Twenty Boy Summer, but I certainly did tear up during the book. It was just such an excellent portrayal of a family dynamic that I¿m sure people can identify with. I loved this book. Definitely pick up a copy ¿ really worth it.
nbmars on LibraryThing 3 months ago
In the summer before Delilah¿s senior year, her single and workaholic mother Claire gets a call that her own mother has just died, so the two leave Pennsylvania for Red Falls, Vermont in order to close up the estate. They are met at the old house by Claire's sister Rachel. Delilah hadn¿t seen her grandmother (¿Nana¿) in eight years since her grandfather's funeral, nor has she even been allowed to speak her name. At her grandfather¿s funeral, her mother and Aunt Rachel had a big fight with their grandmother. Her mother would never tell Delilah what happened. She also won¿t speak to Delilah about a third sister Stephanie, who died at about Delilah¿s age. Nor does Delilah even know much about her father, except that he was a ¿one night stand¿ her mother had with a British journalist who was killed shortly after that in Afghanistan. Back home in Pennsylvania, Delilah¿s mother worked late, and even when she was in the house, there was always a phone hook-up in her ear or a Xanax antidepressant pill on her tongue. Delilah felt angry, frustrated, and helpless:"Sometimes I think about telling Mom how much I hate being home alone every afternoon, turning on the television just to pretend there¿s company. All those takeout dinners at the big dining room table, chairs empty, invisible guests eating invisible soup and drinking made-up wine in my head. I want to shake her and scream and tell her that for all her hard work to secure our future, the snake plants in the foyer know more about my life than she does.¿Delilah started acting out, and often would sneak out to get a physical fix with her ¿non-boyfriend¿ Finn. She knew she didn't love him, but felt driven to be with him:"To hide. To forget. To numb the dull ache of something missing. To erase my mother and her expensive car and late nights at the office. To fill the empty spaces left by my father, killed before I was even born, with something other than endless unanswerable questions.¿When they get to Vermont, her mother wastes no time setting up a temporary office in the house. Meanwhile, Delilah runs into her former best friend Patrick Reese from eight summers ago. Patrick, who has just turned eighteen, has never forgotten Delilah, and apparently has always been in love with her. Together with Emily, a friend of Patrick¿s, the three spend the summer hanging out, ferreting out Delilah¿s family¿s secrets, and exploring the permutations of love and friendship.Discussion: First Issue: Teenaged girls in YA books seem to be pretty self-absorbed in general, but Delilah just may take the grand prize. She treats Patrick and Emily as sounding boards for her own whining, while hardly listening to their problems or giving much in return. At one point, she tells Patrick her so-called friends back home in Pennsylvania ¿haven¿t earned the right to be called friends." Apparently she thinks what constitutes friendship is paying total attention to her and her problems. And yet Patrick and Emily claim to love her because she is ¿so real.¿ Really focused on herself, maybe¿ She gets furious with her mother for something late in the book after she has just done exactly the same thing with Patrick, but that insight never comes to her. It also never occurs to her that after she discovers some family secrets, she keeps them hidden from the rest of the family, even though she has spent her life resenting that they kept secrets from her. I don¿t object to books featuring as a protagonist a self-centered teenager engrossed in her own problems to the exclusion of everyone else¿s. But the author then asks us to believe what seems to me to be not very believable. One is the implication at the end of the book that Delilah has ¿grown.¿ She doesn¿t seem very different, aside from her declaration, in the last two chapters, that she now is. The second is the total loyalty and even wo
Edinette on LibraryThing 3 months ago
An easy to relate to book about a teenager girl named Delilah. This good student with a lot going for her soon hits a road bump as she struggles to stay on track. Her boyfriend who's not so much a boyfriend and her parents splitting up, and not to mention the underlying history of her family. Delilah struggles to unearth the truth about her family, as she also seeks to find the truth about herself. Author Sarah Ockler is now one of my top favorites, as she masters imagery and emotion.
NikGodwin More than 1 year ago
My favorite Ockler book yet! Loved the secrets, the family dynamics, the romance, and literally every little thing about this book!