Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

by Edwin Abbott

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940149503391
Publisher: Xanamania Publishing
Publication date: 06/06/2014
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 983 KB

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Flatland 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 147 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read, don't buy it though. You can get it for free in public domain.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is going to be really corny, but it's true. This book influenced my decision to pursue mathematics and science as a career. Parts of it are a little dry, but these are the social commentary sections. I credit the rest of this book with equipping me to visualize higher dimensions. Definitely worth a read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I recommend this as required reading for any geometry student and/or anyone who has ever given the slightest thought to dimensions other than our lovely 3rd dimension.
Kim_Duppy More than 1 year ago
My friends in the literature department will tell you that this is a clever novel about Victorian England. If that's all it were, I couldn't recommend it to anyone. In point of fact, this book is a kind of bare bones look at culture itself (not merely Victorian Culture). By reducing everything to shapes, the author manages to show how cultures evolve—or perhaps better put: how nature influences the development of culture. Plus, if you don't know much about geometry (I don't), you may learn a little about that as well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This must be the best book I have read in years! It helped me understand mathematically and logically understand other dimensions as well as our own. This book will give you a glimpse of what living in a two dimensional world might look like, and also an Idea of what the fourth dimension might have in store in a logical manner. It also has a fantastic story and description of a two-dimensional culture, government and relationships. I strongly recommend it for geometry or advanced algebra students or anybody who wants a better understanding of multiple dimensions!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an excellent choice for future math teachers. I am a junior in college getting my BA in Middle Level Math Education. This is an excellent book that will help understand demensions beyond our own.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've recommended this book to my students of Geometry, especially those who will be teachers. This is a delightful guide to the understanding dimensions beyond our own. Must be cautioned that it does seem sexist - maybe a reflection of the time it was written.
BrynDahlquis on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
A short, surreal trip that makes me very curious and almost suspicious about life. Never before have I enjoyed geometry so much, and I'll probably never look at it the same way again.
Liberuno on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
I started reading this book thinking that I was just going to get a quick humorous read on geometry. I didn't expect a short story told from the point of view of a square in a plane to hold so many interesting questions ranging in subject: from metaphysics and religion to discrimination.This short book is definitely worth reading.
jorgecardoso on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a great little book by Edwin Abbott. Flatland is a mathematical adventure on geometry. It takes place on a two-dimensional world with a strict hierarchical society based on the shape of its individuals and it describes the consequences of the adventure of one of those individuals (a square) through the realms of three-dimensions. It's a great book that makes us think about more-than-three-dimensional spaces and objects through analogy with two- and one- and even zero-dimensional worlds. As I read this, I thought it would be interesting to see an animation version of this book, but it turns out there are already some movies on Flatland. There is even a recent one with Martin Sheen (voice).
LaurenGommert on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
I love this book...even though most of it's way over my head! Still, an awesome book written with a concept that no one has come close to copying since its release. When the book was written readers weren't sure how to classify it, so it got lumped in with sci-fi...which it isn't really. It has more to do with geometrics and philosophy. I bet that's a pair you never thought you'd see together!
fieldri1 on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
Imagine a world where things exist on a plane of two dimensions. There is no up and down at all. People this world with polygons whose social position is ruled by the number of sides they have (triangles are the plebs, circles are the priests) and the class structure is rigidly adhered to.Then imagine of young person in this world who is contacted by a three dimensional sphere and who offers to take her out of her plane world and show her how the universe really is! This is the concept behind Flatland.Part satire on the class structure of Victorian Britain, part teaching aid for teaching euclidian space, this is a classic book, aimed at children, but powerful and thought provoking enough for adults.Its a very slim volume, but the content and its ideas will sit with you for a very long time.
pratchettfan on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
A fascinating allegory on Victorian society told with two and three dimensional geographical figures. Even though written in the late 19th century, aspects of the story about people's sometimes limited world views are still relevant today and the moralities of the book shouldn't be lightly dismissed. At only 80 pages it is a quick read which you shouldn't miss.
TheBooknerd on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
A classic--all fans of science fiction should read this book.
csixty4 on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
I had such high hopes for this book. I figured any speculative fiction that stood the test of time so well must be something really special. Instead, I got porn for math geeks. The whole first half of the book, a description of the inhabitants of Flatland, might have been more interesting if the details were revealed through narrative, but the explanations and diagrams would make a good cure for insomnia. The second half was more interesting, and indeed the last bits were exciting. But the cost to get there was too much.
m_dow on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
Meh. Not great, but it's a really short read and somewhat entertaining. The "flatland" society is actually rather horrific, full of eugenics and chauvinism, but the story is kind of fun. I wouldn't discourage you from reading it, but I'm not going to run around shouting that this is the best book ever.
TheoClarke on LibraryThing 21 hours ago
A two-dimensional being discovers the third dimension.
aethercowboy on LibraryThing 22 hours ago
Set in a two-dimensional world that could be represented on a large sheet of paper, we meet A. Square, a free thinker in a land ruled by oppressive religious zealots who will hear nothing other than "the world is flat."One day, however, Square meets Sphere, and is bumped out of Flatland and sent on a multidimensional journey.If you've ever been interested in the mathematical concept of dimensions, and want any reason to believe that the fourth dimension is not time, per se, I suggest you read this book, as it will open your eyes to a whole new perspective by likening yourself to Square.
isabelx on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Written in the late 19th century, this book is both a mathematical fantasy set in a two-dimensional world and a satire on Victorian society. Sphere from Spaceland tries to explain the 3rd dimension to Square, a resident of Flatland, but refuses to countenance the possibility of a 4th dimension when Square extrapolates further. Very interesting.
TChesney on LibraryThing 4 days ago
In process:I read this book about 40 to 50 years ago.What a mind opener/expander!
millsge on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Who thought that Euclidean Geometry could be so much fun? This is a book that I have read many times since I first read it in the 9th grade; when we believed it was an esoteric work whose real meaning was about the reality of life in other dimensions. I even found myself in a long discussion with a retired Air Force colonel about the possibility and significance of multiple dimensions with multiple life-forms. The colonel was a kind and patient provocateur who gently brought me back to earth and in an almost Socratic manner helped me put the book and my thoughts about it in a more realistic perspective and one that was more in line with the intentions of the author. So, for me, the book is very special as it gave me a special friend who helped me through the many terrible things young boys with new-step fathers go through.
bratfarrar on LibraryThing 3 months ago
A bit dry, but an excellent way to get interested in geometry. Goes well with Euclid.
psiloiordinary on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Political satire mixed with philosophical and scientific enlightenment.Interesting, thought provoking and very quick read
gazzy on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Ok Ok we get it, the possibility of many dimensions by looking past our own, great now shut up.
MrBobble on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Not at all what I was expecting. No romance was involved. Instead, it was the romance of the mind; figuring out how to move upwards but not northwards. The book is a satire, an essay on multidimensional space, but not a romance novel.