Freaky Monday

Freaky Monday

by Mary Rodgers, Heather Hach

NOOK Book(eBook)

$4.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061858802
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 05/05/2009
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 192
File size: 554 KB
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Mary Rodgers is the author of Freaky Friday, a book that has sold more than a million copies, has been made into two movies, and is now considered, quite rightly, a classic. Mary has also written two other novels for young readers, Summer Switch and A Billion for Boris, as well as the music for the musical Once Upon a Mattress. A trustee of the Juilliard School, Mary Rodgers lives and works in New York City.


Heather Hach (rhymes with Bach) wrote the screenplay for the most recent Freaky Friday movie and the book for Legally Blonde: The Musical. Heather recently appeared as a judge on MTV's The Search for Elle Woods. Heather Hach writes books and screenplays in West Hollywood, California, where she lives with her husband, an animator, and her daughter, a toddler.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Freaky Monday 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Thirteen-year-old Hadley Fox (I so love her name!) is not your average eighth grader. She has a 4.3 GPA (I know, makes me feel terrible for my grades in school!), studies like crazy, and constantly has her nose in a book. Hadley, even at 13, strives for Stanford as her college destination, but the one thing she also strives to do is become her gorgeous, loved-by-everyone older sister, Tatum. Matters turn horrifying for Hadley when she forgets to write down an assignment in her "Super Student Planner Plus" and her whole world seems to collapse around her. Said assignment is an oral report for none other than Tatum's favorite teacher, Ms. Pitt; the hippie, eccentric, over-involved teacher who prefers to be called Carol that Hadley can't stand. As Ms. Pitt makes Hadley try to wing her report and allows her a change in topic, something happens. In the Freaky Friday, Lindsay Lohan/Jamie Lee Curtis fashion, they finish a sentence together, the room shakes (which only they feel), and then they are transformed. This couldn't happen on any worse of a day for either of the two protagonists since today is the first time in months Hadley's crush has spoken to her, and there is the first I-Hate-Mondays DANCE! As for Ms. Pitt (yes, I too can't help but giggle), it is her meeting with the school board to become the head of the English department. Things seem to run amok between both character's lives from family, to love, to even careers, and not quite as smoothly as either would hope. You should also note that there are more correlations between this book and the Freaky Friday movie than there were between the FREAKY FRIDAY book and movie versions, but that's not necessarily a bad thing in this case. I was amused from start to finish because of Hadley from her description of Tatum, which includes this little nugget, "In movies, brunette is code for "friend" and blonde translates to "girlfriend." But this movie logic isn't my reality." And that's just the beginning. We see movies and bands that most will probably notice, and bands that were totally made up (Sketched-Out Boy for example), but either way this is a quick, adorable, and quite amusing read. And it also reminds you that teachers have feelings, lives, and, most of the time, they do actually care. Anyone that is still in school, or even those out of school, should totally read this story. Surprisingly, Hadley, Ms. Pitt, Tatum, and even the more minor characters can teach you something that you probably wouldn't have thought about before, and I mean that in a good way.
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
Trotting along soon after their hugely popular Freaky Friday these authors again entertain young readers/listeners with Freaky Monday. And, this really is an outre day! Young Hadley should be any teacher's dream student - she's almost perfect. Never misses a day at school, is always prepared, alert, and attentive, even to sitting in the front row eager to answer any questions posed. While she rates an A in academic her personal life is a bit off kilter. Hadley is a bit up tight. Her teacher, Ms. Pitt, is not at all rigid. She'd be delighted to have her students call her by her first name, and she wants them to relax, sit in circles and emotionally respond to their assignments. Hadley finds this strange and wishes Ms. Pitt would be more traditional. Well, imagine the surprise, consternation and laughter evoked when a dramatic change takes place - the two find themselves changed into each other's bodies. Now, that's truly freaky. Mary Rodgers has written several books for young readers (including, of course, Freaky Friday, which was made into two movies). She has a rare, infectious humor as does her cohort, Heather Hach. Jennifer Stone delivers an A+ voice performance of the story, bring appropriate amounts of vigor, surprise, and discombobulation to the voices as the story unfolds. - Gail Cooke
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 9 year old grand-daughter carefully selected this book for herself during a visit to a B&N store. I could not get her to look up until she had finished reading the book, so I would say the story is interesting and enjoyable for a curious child around this age.
BoundTogetherForGood on LibraryThing 26 days ago
This is a cute little book, written as a part of the Freaky Friday phenomena that was. I have read all three prior books which were written in the 70s. This one is hot off the presses; and written for TODAY's young tween.In this version of the body-swap it is Hadley, an 8th grader, who switches bodies with her literature teacher. The switch comes about because they both read this quote aloud in class, from To Kill a Mockingbird:
imperfectionist on LibraryThing 26 days ago
Thirteen-year-old Hadley Fox is the typical overachieving, overscheduled, and overwhelmed straight-A student. Though not yet in high school, she is already worrying about how she will get into Stanford. While Hadley is a traditional student, her English teacher Ms. Pitts likes to experiment with unconventional teaching methods. For this reasons, they have never gotten along well. Therefore, when she forgets to prepare for an oral presentation for Ms. Pitts' English class, Hadley completely freaks out. It was not until Hadley and Ms. Pitts switch places can they both understand each other better.It was ironic how Hadley is an overachiever in terms of learning, yet she doesn't realize that Ms. Pitts is also an overachiever in terms of teaching, often staying up late into the night just to correct papers. Their issues are further juxtaposed, as Hadley's and Ms. Pitts' secret admirers are revealed to them in the same Monday. In addition, while Hadley had an important oral presentation to deliver, Ms. Pitts' also had an equally, if not more important, interview for the position of chair of the English department.For such an accomplished junior-high student, Hadley does not really have a lot of respect for Ms. Pitts. This trait, along with her tendency to be a drama queen, annoyed me throughout the story. However, Hadley's obsession with academics reminds me of myself, and I can understand her reactions that result from her paranoia with grades and getting into college. Through her switch with Ms. Pitts, Hadley does learn to be a better person.Though the novel is predictable and greatly resembles Freaky Friday, it was enjoyable to read about the troubles that Hadley and Ms. Pitts encounter while in each other's bodies. I probably would have enjoyed this novel more if the perspective had alternated between the characters, instead of focusing on Hadley's views, considering the premise of the novel.Freaky Monday does have a great moral about not judging people until you have been in their situation. I liked the novel, but I thought it was a bit too simple, especially considering how everything eventually worked out to Hadley's favor. Overall, this was a cute, fun story to read. However, I wouldn't recommend this for anyone above the age of twelve.*This was also reviewed for HarperCollins' Children.
JRlibrary on LibraryThing 26 days ago
"You, uh, never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb into his skin and walk around in it." When 13 year old Junior High school student Hadley and her English teacher, Ms. Pitt, utter this sentence simultaneously, the hand on the clock turns back, the lights, flicker, Hadley feels a jolt, and the two females switch bodies. What follows is a predictably humorous tale of a day spent by a teenager in the body of her teacher. Hadley gets to visit the teacher's lounge, (which didn't resemble any teacher's lounge I've ever been in), attends a self esteem club meeting at which she is the staff advisor, and takes an interview for Ms. Pitt who is hoping to become the department head for English. Meanwhile, Ms. Pitt deals with the interest of a certain teen age boy named Zane. The reader doesn't get to have as much insight into Ms. Pitt's perspective on being a teenager again since the story is told through Hadley's eyes. An enjoyable, fast, lighthearted read which I predict will be enjoyed by anyone who liked Freaky Friday, by the same author.Some figurative language examples from the book include:Hadley, describing the student council president on page 29, "She was vibrating with glee and joy and profound enthusiasm. She was a walking rainbow."OR a hyperbole:Hadley, talking about her sister on page 130, "If anyone is unequipped to deal with things going wrong, it's Tatum. I mean - the streetlights see her coming and turn green on cue," I said.
HarlequinTwilight on LibraryThing 26 days ago
Thirteen-year-old Hadley Fox (I so love her name!) is not your average eighth grader. She has a 4.3 GPA (I know, makes me feel terrible for my grades in school!), studies like crazy, and constantly has her nose in a book. Hadley, even at 13, strives for Stanford as her college destination, but the one thing she also strives to do is become her gorgeous, loved-by-everyone older sister, Tatum.Matters turn horrifying for Hadley when she forgets to write down an assignment in her ¿Super Student Planner Plus¿ and her whole world seems to collapse around her. Said assignment is an oral report for none other than Tatum¿s favorite teacher, Ms. Pitt; the hippie, eccentric, over-involved teacher who prefers to be called Carol that Hadley can¿t stand. As Ms. Pitt makes Hadley try to wing her report and allows her a change in topic, something happens. In the Freaky Friday, Lindsay Lohan/Jamie Lee Curtis fashion, they finish a sentence together, the room shakes (which only they feel), and then they are transformed. This couldn¿t happen on any worse of a day for either of the two protagonists since today is the first time in months Hadley¿s crush has spoken to her, and there is the first I-Hate-Mondays DANCE! As for Ms. Pitt (yes, I too can¿t help but giggle), it is her meeting with the school board to become the head of the English department. Things seem to run amok between both character¿s lives from family, to love, to even careers, and not quite as smoothly as either would hope. You should also note that there are more correlations between this book and the Freaky Friday movie than there were between the Freaky Friday book and movie versions, but that¿s not necessarily a bad thing in this case. I was amused from start to finish because of Hadley from her description of Tatum, which includes this little nugget, ¿In movies, brunette is code for ¿friend¿ and blonde translates to ¿girlfriend.¿ But this movie logic isn¿t my reality.¿ And that¿s just the beginning. We see movies and bands that most will probably notice, and bands that were totally made up (Sketched-Out Boy for example), but either way this is a quick, adorable, and quite amusing read. And it also reminds you that teachers have feelings, lives, and, most of the time, they do actually care. Anyone that is still in school, or even those out of school, should totally read this story. Surprisingly, Hadley, Ms. Pitt, Tatum, and even the more minor characters can teach you something that you probably wouldn¿t have thought about before, and I mean that in a good way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SOME DAYS YOU JUST CANT WATE
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago