Fruit of the Poisonous Tree

Fruit of the Poisonous Tree

by Richard Carson

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Overview

Fruit of the Poisonous Tree by Richard Carson

Fruit of the Poisonous Tree is a riveting account of a small town murder investigation – a case unsolved for eight years and marked by evidence of black magic and other signs of dark forces at work. Author Richard W. Carson takes the reader into the mind of the clever and cunning former boyfriend of the girl who vanished from a rural Michigan village without a trace. The prime suspect taunted local police who lacked a body and any crime scene evidence. A mysterious letter in the style of the missing girl’s writing suggested she had run away to California. And experts were hard-pressed to prove the letter a forgery. A medium warned a young man who eventually offered crucial and admissible hearsay evidence in the case that he was the target of witchcraft. The remarkably accurate predictions of psychics and the role of a devil-worshipping artist add to the story’s mystique. At trial, the accused killer was represented by a Roman Catholic priest. Afterward, several people with ties to the case were struck by tragedy, in some instances at strangely coincidental times. Fruit of the Poisonous Tree is a powerful true story and gripping legal drama.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940014634366
Publisher: Crimewriter Publications
Publication date: 06/26/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 5 MB

About the Author

Richard W. Carson grew up in Detroit, graduated from Cooley High School, attended Ferris State College at Big Rapids, where he appeared unspectacularly as Christian in a campus production of Cyrano DeBergerac. Carson later transferred to the University of Michigan and, having wisely abandoned his interest in the stage, majored in English. In 1967, Carson took a reporter's job in the Huron Daily Tribune where he covered police and the courts and received many awards for editorial and feature writing and photography. He joined The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch in 1981 and was promoted to editorial page editor in 1988, a position he held until his retirement in 2003. Carson's familiarity with the Thumb area of Michigan and personal ties to people involved in the Robin Adams' murder case drew him back to Michigan. Fruit of the Poisonous Tree is a second edition of the book originally titled Murder in the Thumb. The new edition features updated information and a detailed list of characters.

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Fruit of the Poisonous Tree 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
TMS-Avid_Reader_Am_I_0828 More than 1 year ago
It’s a terrible thing when life is cut short. It’s more so when it becomes a cold case for no fault of those involved trying to bring justice to a victim that has to wait for it. Richard W. Carson brings you into the story with eyes wide open in a no nonsense reality that will you unable to put this book down until that last page where you - the reader- letting out your breathe of relief and cheering for the good guys! This page turner is very much a gripping tale has me giving it a 5 out of 5 stars from the first chapter. It is good to see justice prevail as it should. I will be recommended it to anyone who will listen and request that the Barryton Library brings in it’s own copy. I sincerely hope that we will hear more from Richard W. Carson in the future. Well done Mr. Carson. Well done. **ARC provided by Net Gallery for the intent of getting a honest review from me. My opinion is that of my own.**
marilynrhea1 More than 1 year ago
While this book looks like a scary novel, this is the true story of a murdered teenager in a small town. It is well written, and you can tell that the author really put some time into researching this interesting story. Although it is true, it is such a horrific crime, that instinctively you want to think that this is just a horror novel. The crime itself left a definite impression on me that will remain for quite some time. I would recommend this book to anyone that has an interest in true crime.