Good Night, Gorilla

Good Night, Gorilla

by Peggy Rathmann

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Overview

"Good night, Gorilla," says the zookeeper. But mischievous Gorilla isn't quite ready to go to sleep. He'd rather follow the zookeeper on his rounds and let all of the other animals out of their cages. Little night owls can sneak along with Gorilla and see who gets the last laugh in this riotous goodnight romp. Practically wordless yet full of expressive art and hilarious, adorable detail, this book from Caldecott Medal winning author Peggy Rathmann is sure to become a beloved part of children's own bedtime rituals.

ALA Notable Children's Book for 1994
Bulletin Blue Ribbon 1994
Horn Book Fanfare 1995 selection
Parenting Magazine "Best Children's Books of 1994"
New York Public Library 1995 "Children's Books 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing"


"In a book economical in text and simple in illustrations, the many amusing, small details, as well as the tranquil tome of the story, make this an outstanding picture book." —The Horn Book, starred review

“The amiable cartoon characters, vibrant palette, and affectionate tone of the author’s art recall Thatcher Hurd’s cheerful illustrations. Delightful.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"A clever, comforting bedtime story." —School Library Journal, starred review

"Jaunty four-color artwork carries the story and offers more with every look." —Booklist

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780698116498
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 05/01/2000
Series: Picture Puffin Books Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 40
Sales rank: 30,564
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range: 3 - 5 Years

About the Author

Peggy Rathmann is the author of a number of books for children, including the Caldecott Medal winning Officer Buckle & Gloria and the highly acclaimed Good Night, Gorilla. Ms. Rathmann lives and works in San Francisco with her husband, John Wick. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read an Excerpt

Good night, Gorilla


By Peggy Rathmann

G. P. Putnam's Sons

Copyright © 1994 Peggy Rathmann
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-399-23003-3


Chapter One

Good night, Gorilla.

Good night, Elephant.

Good night Hyena.

Good night, Giraffe.

Good night, Armadillo.

Good night, dear.

Good night.

Good night.

Good night.

Good night.

Good night.

Good night

Good night.

Good night, zoo.

Good night, dear.

Good night.

Good night, GorilLa.

Zzzz.

Good night, Lion.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Good night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann Copyright © 1994 by Peggy Rathmann. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Interviews

Caldecott-medalist Peggy Rathmann was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and grew up in the suburbs with two brothers and two sisters.

"In the summer we lolled in plastic wading pools guzzling Kool-Aid. In the winter we sculpted giant snow animals. It was a good life."

Ms. Rathmann graduated from Mounds View High School in New Brighton, Minnesota, then attended colleges everywhere, changing her major repeatedly. She eventually earned a B.A. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.

"I wanted to teach sign language to gorillas, but after taking a class in signing, I realized what I'd rather do was draw pictures of gorillas."

Ms. Rathmann studied commercial art at the American Academy in Chicago, fine art at the Atelier Lack in Minneapolis, and children's-book writing and illustration at the Otis Parsons School of Design in Los Angeles.

"I spent the first three weeks of my writing class at Otis Parsons filching characters from my classmates' stories. Finally, the teacher convinced me that even a beginning writer can create an original character if the character is driven by the writer's most secret weirdness. Eureka! A little girl with a passion for plagiarism! I didn't want anyone to know it was me, so I made the character look like my sister."

The resulting book, Ruby the Copycat, earned Ms. Rathmann the "Most Promising New Author" distinction in Publishers Weekly's 1991 annual Cuffie Awards. In 1992 she illustrated Bootsie Barker Bites for Barbara Bottner, her teacher at Otis Parsons.

A homework assignment produced an almost wordless story, Good Night, Gorilla, inspired by a childhood memory.

"When I was little, the highlight of the summer was running barefoot through the grass, in the dark, screaming. We played kick-the-can, and three-times-around-the-house, and sometimes we just stood staring into other people's picture windows, wondering what it would be like to go home to someone else's house."

That story, however, was only nineteen pages long, and everyone agreed that the ending was a dud. Two years and ten endings later, Good Night, Gorilla was published and recognized as an ALA Notable Children's Book for 1994.

The recipient of the 1996 Caldecott Medal, Officer Buckle and Gloria, is the story of a school safety officer upstaged by his canine partner.

"We have a videotape of my mother chatting in the dining room while, unnoticed by her or the cameraman, the dog is licking every poached egg on the buffet. The next scene shows the whole family at the breakfast table, complimenting my mother on the delicious poached eggs. The dog, of course, is pretending not to know what a poached egg is. The first time we watched that tape we were so shocked, we couldn't stop laughing. I suspect that videotape had a big influence on my choice of subject matter."

Ms. Rathmann lives and works in San Francisco, in an apartment she shares with her husband, John Wick, and a very funny bunch of ants.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Caldecott-medalist Peggy Rathmann was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and grew up in the suburbs with two brothers and two sisters.

"In the summer we lolled in plastic wading pools guzzling Kool-Aid. In the winter we sculpted giant snow animals. It was a good life."

Ms. Rathmann graduated from Mounds View High School in New Brighton, Minnesota, then attended colleges everywhere, changing her major repeatedly. She eventually earned a B.A. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.

"I wanted to teach sign language to gorillas, but after taking a class in signing, I realized what I'd rather do was draw pictures of gorillas."

Ms. Rathmann studied commercial art at the American Academy in Chicago, fine art at the Atelier Lack in Minneapolis, and children's-book writing and illustration at the Otis Parsons School of Design in Los Angeles.

"I spent the first three weeks of my writing class at Otis Parsons filching characters from my classmates' stories. Finally, the teacher convinced me that even a beginning writer can create an original character if the character is driven by the writer's most secret weirdness. Eureka! A little girl with a passion for plagiarism! I didn't want anyone to know it was me, so I made the character look like my sister."

The resulting book, Ruby the Copycat, earned Ms. Rathmann the "Most Promising New Author" distinction in Publishers Weekly's 1991 annual Cuffie Awards. In 1992 she illustrated Bootsie Barker Bites for Barbara Bottner, her teacher at Otis Parsons.

A homework assignment produced an almost wordless story, Good Night, Gorilla, inspired by a childhood memory.

"When I was little, the highlight of the summer was running barefoot through the grass, in the dark, screaming. We played kick-the-can, and three-times-around-the-house, and sometimes we just stood staring into other people's picture windows, wondering what it would be like to go home to someone else's house."

That story, however, was only nineteen pages long, and everyone agreed that the ending was a dud. Two years and ten endings later, Good Night, Gorilla was published and recognized as an ALA Notable Children's Book for 1994.

The recipient of the 1996 Caldecott Medal, Officer Buckle and Gloria, is the story of a school safety officer upstaged by his canine partner.

"We have a videotape of my mother chatting in the dining room while, unnoticed by her or the cameraman, the dog is licking every poached egg on the buffet. The next scene shows the whole family at the breakfast table, complimenting my mother on the delicious poached eggs. The dog, of course, is pretending not to know what a poached egg is. The first time we watched that tape we were so shocked, we couldn't stop laughing. I suspect that videotape had a big influence on my choice of subject matter."

Ms. Rathmann lives and works in San Francisco, in an apartment she shares with her husband, John Wick, and a very funny bunch of ants.

copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Customer Reviews

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Good Night, Gorilla 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 87 reviews.
Readingmom33 More than 1 year ago
Good Night Gorilla is full of action and fun. A great bedtime story that features cute illustrations of the animals. My sons love the book and and I'm sure your children would love it, too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was the first book my 15 month old picked up and he hasn't put it down. We've gone through atleast 4 copies of the book in 6 months because of the wear and tear he puts on the book!! He 'reads' it himself and also has anyone around read it to him.
momreadsalot More than 1 year ago
I was so disappointed when we cracked open our new copy of Good Night Gorilla and discovered a short, near wordless book. I wish a review would have spelled that out a little more. It's nearly mommy-abuse thinking up a new story every day. My son is amused by it- I think it's just for younger kids. At least I've warned some parents.
duluthdawn More than 1 year ago
A fun and funny story your child will want again and again. With few words and engaging pictures, children can easily read it with you. It's a great bedtime book! As a plus, track the red balloon on each page.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is just the most precious bedtime story yet. All the action going on with each page and the illustrations are great. My son loves this book and I'm sure you will, too.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Your child will want to read this over and over, and each time you can point out new things. My three year old son has loved this since he was one and my 18-month old daughter giggles every time she sees the eyes in the dark. You can have fun making different voices for all the animals, and finding the red balloon throughout the book as it sails toward the crescent moon.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Though this book has very few words, it is a wonderful book to discover characters and action through pictures by asking what are they doing or counting the animals. Love to read it just before nap or bedtime. The best part is finding the mouse and the banana!
Guest More than 1 year ago
My 14 month old and I LOVE this book! When I first looked at it, I thought 'there are no words!' but now I realize the VALUE in that: I get to make up a different story every night! It's also nice that I can make the story a quick one or take my time and make up some grand tale! It's currently our favorite bedtime book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My 23-month-old loves this book. Her favorite page is when the zookeeper's wife reacts to all the 'good nights' that she hears in the dark...as if she's saying 'HUH?' I often hear her 'reading' the book after I've tucked her in for the night. Mom's favorite part is seeing all the animals' stuffed animals (like the Babar in the elephant's cage) a cute touch!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Probably the most read book in our daughter's library for a six-month period, and she still pulls it out every now and then even though she's a first-grader and reading on her own. She just loves it. Highly recommended.
farfromkansas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Peggy Rathmann¿s Good Night, Gorilla is an adorable bedtime story about a mischievous gorilla that lets all of the zoo animals out of their cages. As the story begins, the night security guard (a mustached man named Joe) walks around the zoo saying goodnight to all of the animals; little does he know that the gorilla has stolen his keys and is following Joe, unlocking the cages of these animals as Joe bids them goodnight. The animals all follow Joe back to his house and curl up for sleep, until Joe¿s wife realizes what has happened and leads the animals back to the zoo. Somehow, the gorilla and his little mouse friend manage to sneak back into Joe¿s house and go to sleep¿ unbeknownst to Joe and his wife.Rathman¿s book is a sweet tale that utilizes very few words (half of the pages have only pictures without text), but still creates a calming effect with its repetitive use of the phrase ¿good night.¿ This story does resemble Brown and Hurd¿s classic Goodnight Moon, as a character bids goodnight to his/her surroundings, but Rathman¿s illustrations are more cartoonish and kid-friendly. Her use of dark colors will help ease young children into sleep and provide a gentle transition into bedtime. Although Good Night, Gorilla is only sixteen years old, it is definitely destined to become a classic children¿s picture book.Citation:Rathmann, Peggy. Good Night, Gorilla. New York: Putnam, 1994. Print.
mayalanda on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a continuous favorite. The illustrations are magical and beautiful. There are great animals including a mouse on every page. We read this over and over and over.
mbrockington624 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As the zoo keeper makes his nightly rounds a mischievous gorilla lifts his keys and lets all the other animals out behind the zoo keeper. This board book is sparsely worded and relies on the brightly colored illustrations to tell the story. Children will enjoy the vividly imagined illustrations as they follow along and help to tell the story; developing both creativity and visual literacy. The repetitive structure makes it easy to guess what is coming next and works well for emerging readers. This is a great interactive bedtime story for preschoolers through first grade
Trina08 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this book when I was in elementary school and I loved it. This was the first book I learn how to read by myself. This is a fun book to read to younger reader. its about a Zookeeper who loses his keys by the gorilla every night he leaves.
jcofsky on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When a zoo keeper decides to leave for the night and say good night to all the animals, it doesn't really go as planned. The gorilla unlocks his own cage followed by the cages of all the other animals. So, when the zoo keeper goes to say goodnight to his wife he gets a response back from many animals too.
kapeoples on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A beautifully illustrated "worldless" book. The book is zoo themed and introduces children to seven different animals: the gorilla, a mouse, elephant, lion, giraffe, hyena and armadillo in that order.
Elizabeth1977 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This wordless picture book tells the story of a zookeeper who goes home at night and unbeknownst to him is followed by the zoo animals. A silly story that children will love to narrate.
kaitye24 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There was a story in the pictures. Hardly any words but the pictures told the story. Great for children who are learning to read and determine pictuers
humouress on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very funny book. Though the illustrations seem simple and straightforward (and the story certainly is), they contain a wealth of information, and it seems that every time I read the story, I discover something new. We were given this book when my six-year-old was born, and - dusting it off today to read to my one-year-old - I noticed things in the pictures I hadn't noticed before (the colours of the cages and the keys, in this instance). There are so many interesting things to point out, as your child gets older, to encourage them to learn and then discover for themselves as they discuss what is happening in the story.
Jourdon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Peggy Rathmann¿s Good Night, Gorilla is a delightful story that is certain to charm children and amuse parents. A mischievous gorilla steals the Zookeeper's keys and then proceeds to free the other zoo animals and take them on an expedition to the Zookeeper's house. Colorfully and whimsically illustrated, the pictures are what really tell the story, as the simple text leaves much of the action unstated. The illustrations provoke multiple conversations between child and adult by allowing the readers to interpret what is happening in the pictures. Occasionally, the illustration depicts the gorilla looking at the readers with a finger over his mouth, signifying that the gorilla wants to keep the Zookeeper oblivious. Goodnight Gorilla's repetitive tranquil tone makes this a must reread story. It is a hilarious story with few words and encourages a youngster's imagination and personal interpretation.
DayehSensei on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In this practically wordless story, a mischievous gorilla sneaks into his zookeepers' house twice-- even after all the other zoo animals who tried to sneak in have been led back to their cages. The simplicity and simple message (of love and mischief) is communicated very clearly to young readers. This is one of my son's favorites.
Ian2 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story is in the pictures: The gorilla lets out the animals in the zoo and follows the zoo keeper home! Mrs zoo keeper is not amused with her roomful of animals and returns all the animals back to the zoo.
elle0467 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Gorilla is up to no good from the start. He takes the keys from the zoo guard and as the guard says good night to each creature, gorilla unlocks the cages of each animal that has been passed and said good night to. Eventually all the animals end up in the bedroom of the guard and his wife. When she finally wakes up and has to take all the animals back to their cages. -A great funny story for kids to laugh about animals-Great for teaching a lesson in obedience
dchaikin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Gorilla steals some keys and lets all the zoo animals out of their cages.... and they all try sneak in the zookeepers bedroom to sleep. The story is in the pictures, not the words. It's cute and very clever. My 2-yr-old likes to follow a balloon that released as Gorilla escapes and drifts farther away with each page. My daughter liked this best about when she turned 3 and could follow the whole story, laughing hysterically when the zookeepers wife discovers all the animals in her room.
SarahEHWilson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book for kids... and, if you also have her book "Ten Minutes Till Bedtime," you will see lots of charming secrets from this one hidden in that one.