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Gunga Din and Other Favorite Poems / Edition 1
     

Gunga Din and Other Favorite Poems / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Rudyard Kipling
 

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ISBN-10: 0486264718

ISBN-13: 2900486264713

Pub. Date: 07/01/1990

Publisher: Dover Publications

In such poems as "Gunga Din", Rudyard Kipling evoked stirring images and created archtypes of British character at the height of the Empire. Filled with character study, dramatic incident and rousing language, the poems delineate the time, place and ethos of British ascendancy as surely as a novel or history of the period, yet they possess a timelessness and

Overview

In such poems as "Gunga Din", Rudyard Kipling evoked stirring images and created archtypes of British character at the height of the Empire. Filled with character study, dramatic incident and rousing language, the poems delineate the time, place and ethos of British ascendancy as surely as a novel or history of the period, yet they possess a timelessness and universality that lifts them above the purely temporal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900486264713
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
07/01/1990
Series:
Dover Thrift Editions Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
80

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

From Departmental Ditties and Other Poems (1886 ff.)
  A Legend of the Foreign Office
  The Story of Uriah
  My Rival
  The Betrothed
From Ballads and Barrack-Room Ballads (1892 ff.)
  The Ballad of East and West
  The Ballad of the King's Mercy
  The Ballad of the 'Bolivar'
  The Conundrum of the Workshops
  In the Neolithic Age
  The English Flag
  Tomlinson
  Danny Deever
  Tommy
  'Fuzzy-Wuzzy'
  Gunga Din
  Oonts
  The Widow at Windsor
  Mandalay
  Gentlemen-Rankers
  L'Envoi (The Long Trail)
From The Seven Seas (1896)
  McAndrew's Hymn
  Sestina of the Tramp-Royal
  When 'Omer smote 'is bloomin' lyre'
  The Ladies
  The Sergeant's Weddin'
  The 'Eathen
  L'Envoi ('When Earth's last picture is painted')
From The Five Nations (1903)
  The Sea and the Hills
  The White Man's Burden
  Boots
From Songs from Books (1912 ff.)
  Cities and Thrones and Powers (from Puck of Pook's Hill, 1906)
  Tarrant Moss (from Plain Tales from the Hills, 1888)
  A Song to Mithras (from Puck of Pook's Hill)
  Hadramauti (from Plain Tales from the Hills)
  The Law of the Jungle (from The Second Jungle Book, 1895)
  Blue Roses (from The Light That Failed, 1890)
  Mother o' Mine (from The Light That Failed)
From Miscellaneous Sources
  The Vampire (1897)
  Recessional (1897)
  The Absent-Minded Beggar (1899)
  The Female of Species (1911)

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Gunga Din and Other Favorite Poems 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Quite unfortunately, Kipling has faded in literary popularity, in part, because he was, supposedly, the 'poet of imperialism.' There is some truth to this but, far more importantly, Kipling was arguably the greatest of all writers of the English Language. His poetry is simply superb. At one level, it is direct, masuculine and blunt. At another level, it is subtle and insightful, indeed. 'So 'ere's to you Fuzzy Wuzzy at your 'ome in the Sudan You're a poor benighted 'eathen but a first-class fightin' man.' Or, the poem that prevented Kipling from being appointed Poet-Laureate of Great Britain [Queen Victoria was NOT pleased]. 'So 'ere's to you, Widow at Windsor For 'alf of creation you own and we've won her the same with the sword and the flame and salted it down with our bones. Poor boys. It's blue with our bones.' Lines like this are the work of genius and have never been surpassed...and...in terms of Kipling's being a bone-headed colonialist, well, his detractors clearly never actually read Kipling. 'Din, Din, Din You Lazarusian Leather Gunga Din Though I've beat you Though I've flayed you You're a better man than I am Gunga Din.' Kipling was a man both humane and intelligent enough to understand and 'feel' the ambiguities of colonialism and empire.