The Gunslinger (Dark Tower Series #1)

The Gunslinger (Dark Tower Series #1)

by Stephen King

Paperback(Reprint)

$13.60 $16.00 Save 15% Current price is $13.6, Original price is $16. You Save 15%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, February 21

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781501143519
Publisher: Scribner
Publication date: 05/03/2016
Series: Dark Tower Series , #1
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 12,787
Product dimensions: 8.30(w) x 5.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile: 750L (what's this?)

About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), the Bill Hodges trilogy End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and an AT&T Audience Network original television series). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower and It are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

Hometown:

Bangor, Maine

Date of Birth:

September 21, 1947

Place of Birth:

Portland, Maine

Education:

B.S., University of Maine at Orono, 1970

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER ONE

The Gunslinger

The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

The desert was the apotheosis of all deserts, huge, standing to the sky for what looked like eternity in all directions. It was white and blinding and waterless and without feature save for the faint, cloudy haze of the mountains which sketched themselves on the horizon and the devil-grass which brought sweet dreams, nightmares, death. An occasional tombstone sign pointed the way, for once the drifted track that cut its way through the thick crust of alkali had been a highway. Coaches and buckas had followed it. The world had moved on since then. The world had emptied.

The gunslinger had been struck by a momentary dizziness, a kind of yawing sensation that made the entire world seem ephemeral, almost a thing that could be looked through. It passed and, like the world upon whose hide he walked, he moved on. He passed the miles stolidly, not hurrying, not loafing. A hide waterbag was slung around his middle like a bloated sausage. It was almost full. He had progressed through the khef over many years, and had reached perhaps the fifth level. Had he been a Manni holy man, he might not have even been thirsty; he could have watched his own body dehydrate with clinical, detached attention, watering its crevices and dark inner hollows only when his logic told him it must be done. He was not a Manni, however, nor a follower of the Man Jesus, and considered himself in no way holy. He was just an ordinary pilgrim, in other words, and all he could say with real certainty was that he was thirsty. And even so, he had no particular urge to drink. In a vague way, all this pleased him. It was what the country required, it was a thirsty country, and he had in his long life been nothing if not adaptable.

Below the waterbag were his guns, carefully weighted to his hands; a plate had been added to each when they had come to him from his father, who had been lighter and not so tall. The two belts crisscrossed above his crotch. The holsters were oiled too deeply for even this Philistine sun to crack. The stocks of the guns were sandalwood, yellow and finely grained. Rawhide tiedowns held the holsters loosely to his thighs, and they swung a bit with his step; they had rubbed away the bluing of his jeans (and thinned the cloth) in a pair of arcs that looked almost like smiles. The brass casings of the cartridges looped into the gunbelts heliographed in the sun. There were fewer now. The leather made subtle creaking noises.

His shirt, the no-color of rain or dust, was open at the throat, with a rawhide thong dangling loosely in hand-punched eyelets. His hat was gone. So was the horn he had once carried; gone for years, that horn, spilled from the hand of a dying friend, and he missed them both.

He breasted a gently rising dune (although there was no sand here; the desert was hardpan, and even the harsh winds that blew when dark came raised only an aggravating harsh dust like scouring powder) and saw the kicked remains of a tiny campfire on the lee side, the side the sun would quit earliest. Small signs like this, once more affirming the man in black's possible humanity, never failed to please him. His lips stretched in the pitted, flaked remains of his face. The grin was gruesome, painful. He squatted.

His quarry had burned the devil-grass, of course. It was the only thing out here that would burn. It burned with a greasy, flat light, and it burned slow. Border dwellers had told him that devils lived even in the flames. They burned it but would not look into the light. They said the devils hypnotized, beckoned, would eventually draw the one who looked into the fires. And the next man foolish enough to look into the fire might see you.

The burned grass was crisscrossed in the now familiar ideographic pattern, and crumbled to gray senselessness before the gunslinger's prodding hand. There was nothing in the remains but a charred scrap of bacon, which he ate thoughtfully. It had always been this way. The gunslinger had followed the man in black across the desert for two months now, across the endless, screamingly monotonous purgatorial wastes, and had yet to find spoor other than the hygienic sterile ideographs of the man in black's campfires. He had not found a can, a bottle, or a waterbag (the gunslinger had left four of those behind, like dead snakeskins). He hadn't found any dung. He assumed the man in black buried it.

Perhaps the campfires were a message, spelled out one Great Letter at a time. Keep your distance, partner, it might say. Or, The end draweth nigh. Or maybe even, Come and get me. It didn't matter what they said or didn't say. He had no interest in messages, if messages they were. What mattered was that these remains were as cold as all the others. Yet he had gained. He knew he was closer, but did not know how he knew. A kind of smell, perhaps. That didn't matter, either. He would keep going until something changed, and if nothing changed, he would keep going, anyway. There would be water if God willed it, the oldtimers said. Water if God willed it, even in the desert. The gunslinger stood up, brushing his hands.

No other trace; the wind, razor-sharp, had of course filed away even what scant tracks the hardpan might once have held. No man-scat, no cast-off trash, never a sign of where those things might have been buried. Nothing. Only these cold campfires along the ancient highway moving southeast and the relentless range-finder in his own head. Although of course it was more than that; the pull southeast was more than just a sense of direction, was even more than magnetism.

He sat down and allowed himself a short pull from the waterbag. He thought of that momentary dizziness earlier in the day, that sense of being almost untethered from the world, and wondered what it might have meant. Why should that dizziness make him think of his horn and the last of his old friends, both lost so long ago at Jericho Hill? He still had the guns-his father's guns-and surely they were more important than horns ... or even friends.

Weren't they?

The question was oddly troubling, but since there seemed to be no answer but the obvious one, he put it aside, possibly for later consideration. He scanned the desert and then looked up at the sun, which was now sliding into a far quadrant of the sky that was, disturbingly, not quite true west. He got up, removed his threadbare gloves from his belt, and began to pull devil-grass for his own fire, which he laid over the ashes the man in black had left. He found the irony, like his thirst, bitterly appealing.

He did not take the flint and steel from his purse until the remains of the day were only fugitive heat in the ground beneath him and a sardonic orange line on the monochrome horizon. He sat with his gunna drawn across his lap and watched the southeast patiently, looking toward the mountains, not hoping to see the thin straight line of smoke from a new campfire, not expecting to see an orange spark of flame, but watching anyway because watching was a part of it, and had its own bitter satisfaction. You will not see what you do not look for, maggot,

Cort would have said. Open the gobs the gods gave ya, will ya not?

But there was nothing. He was close, but only relatively so. Not close enough to see smoke at dusk, or the orange wink of a campfire.

He laid the flint down the steel rod and struck his spark to the dry, shredded grass, muttering the old and powerful nonsense words as he did: "Spark-a-dark, where's my sire? Will I lay me? Will I stay me? Bless this camp with fire." It was strange how some of childhood's words and ways fell at the wayside and were left behind, while others clamped tight and rode for life, growing the heavier to carry as time passed. He lay down upwind of his little blazon, letting the dreamsmoke blow out toward the waste. The wind, except for occasional gyrating dust-devils, was constant.

Above, the stars were unwinking, also constant. Suns and worlds by the million. Dizzying constellations, cold fire in every primary hue. As he watched, the sky washed from violet to ebony. A meteor etched a brief, spectacular arc below Old Mother and winked out. The fire threw strange shadows as the devil-grass burned its slow way down into new patterns-not ideograms but a straightforward crisscross vaguely frightening in its own no-nonsense surety. He had laid his fuel in a pattern that was not artful but only workable. It spoke of blacks and whites. It spoke of a man who might straighten bad pictures in strange hotel rooms. The fire burned its steady, slow flame, and phantoms danced in its incandescent core. The gunslinger did not see. The two patterns, art and craft, were welded together as he slept. The wind moaned, a witch with cancer in her belly. Every now and then a perverse downdraft would make the smoke whirl and puff toward him and he breathed some of it in. It built dreams in the same way that a small irritant may build a pearl in an oyster. The gunslinger occasionally moaned with the wind. The stars were as indifferent to this as they were to wars, crucifixions, resurrections. This also would have pleased him.

II

He had come down off the last of the foothills leading the mule, whose eyes were already dead and bulging with the heat. He had passed the last town three weeks before, and since then there had only been the deserted coach track and an occasional huddle of border dwellers' sod dwellings. The huddles had degenerated into single dwellings, most inhabited by lepers or madmen. He found the madmen better company. One had given him a stainless steel Silva compass and bade him give it to the Man Jesus. The gunslinger took it gravely. If he saw Him, he would turn over the compass. He did not expect that he would, but anything was possible. Once he saw a taheen-this one a man with a raven's head-but the misbegotten thing fled at his hail, cawing what might have been words. What might even have been curses.

Five days had passed since the last hut, and he had begun to suspect there would be no more when he topped the last eroded hill and saw the familiar low-backed sod roof.

The dweller, a surprisingly young man with a wild shock of strawberry hair that reached almost to his waist, was weeding a scrawny stand of corn with zealous abandon. The mule let out a wheezing grunt and the dweller looked up, glaring blue eyes coming target-center on the gunslinger in a moment. The dweller was unarmed, with no bolt nor bah the gunslinger could see. He raised both hands in curt salute to the stranger and then bent to the corn again, humping up the row next to his hut with back bent, tossing devil-grass and an occasional stunted corn plant over his shoulder. His hair flopped and flew in the wind that now came directly from the desert, with nothing to break it.

The gunslinger came down the hill slowly, leading the donkey on which his waterskins sloshed. He paused by the edge of the lifeless-looking cornpatch, drew a drink from one of his skins to start the saliva, and spat into the arid soil.

"Life for your crop."

"Life for your own," the dweller answered and stood up. His back popped audibly. He surveyed the gunslinger without fear. The little of his face visible between beard and hair seemed unmarked by the rot, and his eyes, while a bit wild, seemed sane. "Long days and pleasant nights, stranger."

"And may you have twice the number."

"Unlikely," the dweller replied, and voiced a curt laugh. "I don't have nobbut corn and beans," he said. "Corn's free, but you'll have to kick something in for the beans. A man brings them out once in a while. He don't stay long." The dweller laughed shortly. "Afraid of spirits. Afraid of the bird-man, too."

"I saw him. The bird-man, I mean. He fled me."

"Yar, he's lost his way. Claims to be looking for a place called Algul Siento, only sometimes he calls it Blue Haven or Heaven, I can't make out which. Has thee heard of it?"

The gunslinger shook his head.

"Well ... he don't bite and he don't bide, so fuck him. Is thee alive or dead?"

"Alive," the gunslinger said. "You speak as the Manni do."

"I was with 'em awhile, but that was no life for me; too chummy, they are, and always looking for holes in the world."

This was true, the gunslinger reflected. The Manni-folk were great travelers.

The two of them looked at each other in silence for a moment, and then the dweller put out his hand. "Brown is my name."

The gunslinger shook and gave his own name. As he did so, a scrawny raven croaked from the low peak of the sod roof. The dweller gestured at it briefly: "That's Zoltan."

At the sound of its name the raven croaked again and flew across to Brown. It landed on the dweller's head and roosted, talons firmly twined in the wild thatch of hair.

"Screw you," Zoltan croaked brightly. "Screw you and the horse you rode in on."

The gunslinger nodded amiably.

"Beans, beans, the musical fruit," the raven recited, inspired. "The more you eat, the more you toot."

"You teach him that?"

"That's all he wants to learn, I guess," Brown said. "Tried to teach him The Lord's Prayer once." His eyes traveled out be- yond the hut for a moment, toward the gritty, featureless hardpan. "Guess this ain't Lord's Prayer country. You're a gunslinger. That right?"

"Yes." He hunkered down and brought out his makings. Zoltan launched himself from Brown's head and landed, flittering, on the gunslinger's shoulder.

"Thought your kind was gone."

"Then you see different, don't you?"

"Did'ee come from In-World?"

"Long ago," the gunslinger agreed.

"Anything left there?"

To this the gunslinger made no reply, but his face suggested this was a topic better not pursued. "After the other one, I guess."

"Yes." The inevitable question followed: "How long since he passed by?"

Brown shrugged. "I don't know. Time's funny out here. Distance and direction, too. More than two weeks. Less than two months. The bean man's been twice since he passed. I'd guess six weeks. That's probably wrong."

"The more you eat, the more you toot," Zoltan said.

"Did he lay by?" the gunslinger asked.

Brown nodded. "He stayed supper, same as you will, I guess. We passed the time."

The gunslinger stood up and the bird flew back to the roof, squawking. He felt an odd, trembling eagerness.

"What did he talk about?"

Brown cocked an eyebrow at him. "Not much. Did it ever rain and when did I come here and had I buried my wife. He asked was she of the Manni-folk and I said yar, because it seemed like he already knew. I did most of the talking, which ain't usual." He paused, and the only sound was the stark wind. "He's a sorcerer, ain't he?"

"Among other things."

Brown nodded slowly. "I knew. He dropped a rabbit out of his sleeve, all gutted and ready for the pot. Are you?"

"A sorcerer?" He laughed. "I'm just a man."

"You'll never catch him."

"I'll catch him."

—from The Gunslinger: The Dark Tower I by Stephen King, copyright © 1982, 2003 Stephen King, published by Viking Press, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., all rights reserved, reprinted with permission from the publisher.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Gunslinger 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 948 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While I thought this was a good story, it is definitely weird. In my opinion, it was a little slow at times, but it definitely picked up at other times. The book appears to be setting up a great story. I will definitely read the rest of the series. By the way, the 175 page book is the expanded edition, and is not a sample. King added around 30 pages. I had the original ebook version which was around 130 pages. Keep in mind, the number of ebook pages are generally less than paperback.
Erin Zink More than 1 year ago
Unlike previous reviewers have stated, this is not a mere sample of the book. It is the full book, and it is fantastic. I began the series about 15 years ago and was only able to read the first 4 books since the others had not yet been written. I am excited to go back and start the series over knowing that I will be rewarded with an epic conclusion.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best series of books ever. I do not read at all. Video game type of guy. Fast and hard are the only things that keeps my attention. Except for this. I read every book until i ran out and had to wait on the next one, Wolves of the Colla. I have four of the seven and i am waiting until i can get all hard copies before I start reading again. Look, its a journey! Do yourself a favor and start here. Best choice you will ever make.
JeffNewman More than 1 year ago
I read before bed for about 30min to an hour until I can't fight it anymore and just fall asleep. Do not, I repeat do not read this book in that manner. It is meant to be read in one sitting. I read through the entire book and when finished was wondering if I had interpreted everything correctly or if I had missed a chapter here or there. Breaking it up into different sittings didn't help this issue. I later read a detailed review of the book and it is all clear now. The book is very subtle if that is the right word. Explanations are given then immediately followed up by the main character wondering if what was just said "is the truth or not", thus leaving the comment to be interpreted by you. Maybe mysterious is a better word. The Gunslinger himself is not described very well and I had a hard time trying to envision him during this journey. Most of all the time/frame and setting is never really explained until the end. Is this a future earth, is it earth in another dimension, is it an entirely different fantasy land. It is all left for your interpretation. After initially finishing the book I felt let down but now as I write this review the fact that it has caused me to put in this much thought is right now getting me slightly excited about seeing what the next installment has to offer.
Ian Sawyer More than 1 year ago
Was sometimes a little slow but it was needed for the later novels. Also it is the full book it was just compressed a little. It was still all there.
Obinerin More than 1 year ago
First off, I loved the Dark Tower series - really great stuff. It got a bit weird as it went along, but whatever. I read The Gunslinger years ago, in high school. So I was excited to get into it again, and just recently picked up this version. I also just recently returned it - here's why: King did something I hate. He took the original novel and revised it. Reading the first section, I was aghast to see that it wasn't some minor factual errors or grammar mistakes he had corrected. Instead, he had basically rewritten the book, changing scenes, characters, dialogue, and the plot. It's just like what they did with the Star Wars movies, but worse. It's a different book, written by a different man, King today as opposed to King in the 70's. I hate this kind of revisionism. What was done cannot and should not be changed. What's more, I found some of his revisions laughable and absurd. I'll go back and find the original. Shame on you, Mr. King, for a lack of artistic integrity - and for this book, you'll not get my money. Hope this helps someone.
Roni-Night More than 1 year ago
I am a huge Stephen King fan and I bought this book on a whim. I'd read a bunch of review saying it wasn't very good (I disagree, just so you know) but I figured that it was a King book so it had to be good. I was way wrong. It wasn't good it was GREAT. I'm now addicted to this series and I can't wait to read the rest. Christmas can't come quick enough! If you like fantasy or horror or just Stephen King you have GOT to read this book. It was amazing and I might even read it again while I'm waiting to get the rest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am halfway through the 4th book in The Dark Tower Series and i cannot put these books down! im a highschool student and i was supposed to read 2000 pages this semester so i decided to red stephen king novels and im well over 2500 and the semesters not done yet! normally i have trouble reading books for school but i had no trouble reading this series. i would recommend the series to anyone that is a stephen king fan or interested in action, mystery, suspense and adventure. To start with the first book in the series is sort of a slower book to read and you really have to pay attention to what you read or you'll get lost in whats happening. i would say that to read this book you also have to be tolerant to bad language and have a good set of vocabulary and comprehension skills. stephen king does a great job keeping the reader guessing throughout this novel and not losing the readers interest throughout.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I own the actuall book and it is great. It has so many different twists and turns you never know what to expect.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anyone interested in fantasy/science fiction will be captivated
beyondapointofthought More than 1 year ago
When i first started reading this book, I thought "What is going ON!?" I knew it took place in some kind of arid desert, but it also had a western movie feel to it, as well as magic and sorcery. Intrigued by this interesting mix of options, I kept turning the page one after another, simply fascinated by this world that Stephen King has spent the majority of his life creating. This first book starts off a little slow, I'll give you that, but as it goes on it builds momentum and soon enough you discover that you don't want to put it down because you want to know what happens next. I HIGHLY recommend you read this book. Try not to think too deeply on it- King does all of the work for you- just prepare yourself for one hell of an amazing adventure with some truly remarkable characters. I can't believe I'm about to say this, but I will compare this to the legendary Harry Potter- they're both amazing works of art and should not be missed. 
McCarthy92 More than 1 year ago
I am a big fan of Lord of the Rings and The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly is my second favorite movie of all time, so The Gunslinger is a reading experience that I will never forget. I always enjoyed Stephen King and in this book, and hopefully in the other six Dark Tower books, King writes with great prose that reminded me of Cormac McCarthy. I would definitely recommend this book to others with similar interests as me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stephen King is always a favorite author. Big fan of his works.
Anonymous 5 months ago
Great
mohi on LibraryThing 7 months ago
The first book in the Dark Tower series. Very different in feel and style than the rest of its sequels, since it was King's second published book and something of an experiment for him. Dark and surreal.
thelibrarina on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This is the only book of King's Dark Tower series to land on my Favorites shelf. From the first page to that final sunset by the sea, this book pulls me in every time."The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed." Roland is a gunslinger in a world that has, in his words, "moved on." He is chasing the man in black, who knows more than he will tell about the gunslinger's quest for the Dark Tower, and he is beginning to catch up. Then he finds the boy Jake in an abandoned way-station, and he becomes Roland's traveling companion. They walk on for a long time, but in the end Roland will have to make his choice--the Man in Black and the Dark Tower beyond, or the boy's life?I would recommend scouring your libraries, used book stores, and the Internet to get a copy of the original version. The revised edition feels warped to me, like it's been bent out of shape in order to fit properly with the rest of the books. It's peppered with references to things that don't show up again until Wolves of the Calla, so unless King plans to edit all of the early books (and I hope he doesn't), the revisions aren't even very helpful to the continuity.
ebooker_ben on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Wow, this is a heavy book that I struggled to get through. I don't like the characters (any of them, not for one bit), I don't like the world that described, I hate the monsters and the philosophy I don't want to discuss. Yet it's a fantastic book that really got to me, it's just that it got to me so much it's been just over a year and I'm only now ready to get on with the next one in the series.
Justin1982 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
The first installment of The Dark Tower Series, 'The Gunslinger' has an interesting, almost cycling or backwards narrative. Don't let this intimidate you, though. A gripping first step on an epic journey.
wispywillow on LibraryThing 8 months ago
I'm re-starting the Dark Tower series after a hiatus of about 3 years. Before, I got 3 books into the series before university took up my time. Now I'm starting again from the beginning with the intention of finishing the series.King truly is a fabulous storyteller... though sometimes his similes and metaphors seem startlingly ugly simply for shock value. I don't mind a bleak metaphor or simile--in fact, they are often a fresh of breath air in a world that often praises "flowery" writers; but one after another is sometimes a bit much.Nonetheless, he weaves a fine tale, and his imagination is a thing to be envied.Only the depiction of women in this book prevents me from giving it another 1/2 star or full star. It seems every woman in this first book is just a sad, desperate person who lust after men because they are the only things that can satisfy their sexual "itch."It's been a while since I've read the female character that comes in later, the black woman in the wheelchair, so I'll hold my tongue about the woman issue for now... though I will say that at this point, it seems women are nothing but vaginas on legs--not in how men treat them (at least, not all of them men), but in how women act and seem to think of themselves.
TexasTam on LibraryThing 8 months ago
What a great read. Far different that most of Stephen Kings novels, but well worth the read.
tahmthelame on LibraryThing 8 months ago
First in the Dark Tower series and still my favorite one. Here we're introduced to Roland Deschain, wandering gunslinger. Fabulous.
stipe168 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
just couldn't get into it.. probably because i've read gaiman and garth ennis already.. not as cool as king wants it to be.. violence and drugs are only haphazardly thrown around, just for the sake of it. started good, ended cold.
danconsiglio on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Steven King's best, no contest. Think post-apocalyptic mutant cowboy revenge story with Steven Hawking acting as a consultant. That's not even a little bit of an exaggeration. This book is so beautifully over the top. If only he had stopped the story here . . .
wortklauberlein on LibraryThing 8 months ago
The Dark Tower series kept turning up in reader reviews of "The Passage" and other recent post-apocalyptic sci-fi but at least based on the first book, the derivatives exceed the Stephen King original. Or maybe I'm just tired of religious parables mixed with gruesome violence. Not to mention trilogies (this one's a septilogy) ...Until the last part, the story at least kept moving along and this reader hoped eventually to find answers to the questions of what sort of world this was, in which people played "Hey, Jude" (on what device, I don't know) but acted like they'd just entered the set of "High Noon." The Gunslinger, aka Roland, is a knight of sorts, on a quest, of course. His own country has medieval elements, though there are at least a few guns. He trudges the changed and parched land to confront the mysterious Man in Black. Unfortunately, when he does and the big reveal of Who He Is is made, I was unsurprised. This may be because I had already conflated the two characters who are the one Man. Maybe there were three in one, which would be more in keeping with the biblical overtones, but if there were, I missed one.Perhaps the series would grow on me; I'm not sure I'll give it another try though. Despite its length, I much preferred King's "The Dome," which didn't devolve into a whole lot of mumbo-jumbo fraught with meaning and insignificance.
Audacity88 on LibraryThing 8 months ago
Unlike what I was expecting from an author with such mainstream name recognition, this is a solid sci-fi/fantasy mix, with the darker elements (in particular the cynical and world-weary protagonist) adding a refreshing spin.