Heat and Light

Heat and Light

by Jennifer Haigh

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061763496
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 02/28/2017
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 296,335
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.40(d)

About the Author

Jennifer Haigh is the author of the short-story collection News from Heaven and four critically acclaimed novels: Faith, The Condition, Baker Towers, and Mrs. Kimble. Her books have won both the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction and the PEN/L.L. Winship Award for work by a New England writer. Her short fiction has been published widely, in The Atlantic, Granta, The Best American Short Stories, and many other places. She lives in Boston.

Hometown:

Boston, Massachusetts

Date of Birth:

October 16, 1968

Place of Birth:

Barnesboro, Pennsylvania

Education:

B.A., Dickinson College, 1990; M.F.A., Iowa Writers' Workshop, 2002

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Heat and Light 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
smg5775 More than 1 year ago
Well done story about a community and the effects fracking has on it whether they leased their land or not. A very timely book especially where I live. So much that happens in the book is happening here and knowing people who have leased their land to the companies doing the fracking, I see the same thing happening here. These are good characters. I liked the storylines for each of them. I wish Jess' would have ended better. I did not like Kip and his cronies. As long as the money was coming in, they never questioned or reined in Kip. I liked Rich's introspection as the end. Excellent reading. Worth your time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have other books by the author and really enjoyed them. This book had too many loose ends. Ms. Haigh seemed to be all over the place. She needed to stick to the main characters and the impact of the issue of fracking. She had lesbians, possible transgender, substance abusers, a female minister having an affair with an oil worker, a dishonest oil man and the list goes on and on. Oh there is even suspicion of a mother inducing illnesses with her child (Muchaussin). There were side stories that distracted from the story. Where were her editors?