ISBN-10:
0520063295
ISBN-13:
9780520063297
Pub. Date:
01/07/1988
Publisher:
University of California Press
Holy Feast and Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women / Edition 1

Holy Feast and Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women / Edition 1

by Caroline Walker Bynum
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780520063297
Publisher: University of California Press
Publication date: 01/07/1988
Series: The New Historicism: Studies in Cultural Poetics , #1
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 464
Sales rank: 634,446
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.25(d)

About the Author


Caroline Walker Bynum is Western Medieval History Professor Emerita
School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study.

Table of Contents


Foreword
Note on the Text
Author's Note

The Boston Poems
Cups 1-12
The Park
The Faerie Queene
The Moth Poem
Image-Nations -4
Les Chiméres
Charms
Great Companion: Pindar
Image-Nations 5-14 and Uncollected Poems
Streams I
Syntax
Pell Mell
Great Companion: Robert Duncan
Streams II
Exody
Notes
Great Companion: Dante Alighiere
Wanders
So
Oh!

Afterword
Index of Titles and First Lines

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Holy Feast and Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
SeraSolig on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Great reference book on Medieval Church and Food.
Gwendydd on LibraryThing 5 months ago
An absolutely essential book for anyone interested in the Middle Ages or the history of Christianity. Bynum does an amazing job of exploring her topic in depth and taking a bunch of practices that seem really weird to the modern reader and making them seem perfectly reasonable - she gets you into the mindset of these medieval women so that you can see why they behave the way they do. The book is getting a little outdated because it is pretty feminist, but it is still an amazing landmark in medieval studies.