How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: The Fatal Errors That Led To Nazi Defeat

How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: The Fatal Errors That Led To Nazi Defeat

by Bevin Alexander
4.4 18

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Overview

How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: The Fatal Errors That Led To Nazi Defeat by Bevin Alexander

Most of us rally around the glory of the Allies' victory over the Nazis in World War II. The story is often told of how the good fight was won by an astonishing array of manpower and stunning tactics. However, what is often overlooked is how the intersection between Adolf Hitler's influential personality and his military strategy was critical in causing Germany to lose the war.

With an acute eye for detail and his use of clear prose, acclaimed military historian Bevin Alexander goes beyond counterfactual "What if?" history and explores for the first time just how close the Allies were to losing the war. Using beautifully detailed, newly designed maps, How Hitler Could Have Won World War II   exquisitely illustrates the  important battles and how certain key movements and mistakes by Germany were crucial in determining the war's outcome. Alexander's harrowing study shows how only minor tactical changes in Hitler's military approach could have changed the world we live in today.

How Hitler Could Have Won World War II untangles some of the war's most confounding strategic questions, such as:
Why didn't the Nazis concentrate their enormous military power on the only three beaches upon which the Allies could launch their attack into Europe?
Why did the terrifying German panzers, on the brink of driving the British army into the sea in May 1940, halt their advance and allow the British to regroup and evacuate at Dunkirk?
With the chance to cut off the Soviet lifeline of oil, and therefore any hope of Allied victory from the east, why did Hitler insist on dividing and weakening his army, which ultimately led to the horrible battle of Stalingrad?

Ultimately, Alexander probes deeply into the crucial intersection between Hitler's psyche and military strategy and how his paranoia fatally overwhelmed his acute political shrewdness to answer the most terrifying question: Just how close were the Nazis to victory?

Why did Hitler insist on terror bombing London in the late summer of 1940, when the German air force was on the verge of destroying all of the RAF sector stations, England's last defense?

With the opportunity to drive the British out of Egypt and the Suez Canal and occupy all of the Middle East, therefore opening a Nazi door to the vast oil resources of the region, why did Hitler fail to move in just a few panzer divisions to handle such an easy but crucial maneuver?

On the verge of a last monumental effort and concentration of German power to seize Moscow and end Stalin's grip over the Eastern front, why did the Nazis divert their strength to bring about the far less important surrender of Kiev, thereby destroying any chance of ever conquering the Soviets?

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780609808443
Publisher: Crown/Archetype
Publication date: 12/11/2001
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 556,984
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.14(h) x 0.95(d)

About the Author

Bevin Alexander is the author of five books of military history, including Lost Victories, which was named by the Civil War Book Review as one of the seventeen books that has most transformed Civil War scholarship. His battle studies of the Korean War, written during his decorated service as a combat historian, are stored at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. He lives in Bremo Bluff, Virginia.

From the Hardcover edition.

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How Hitler Could Have Won World War II: The Fatal Errors That Led To Nazi Defeat 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am finishing up Bevin Alexander's How Hitler Could Have Won World War II and I cant put the book down. Great detail on every key battle along with great insight on Hitler's fatal decisions. The author does a good job of showing the reader the flaws with not only Hitler's military decison making but also those of the Allies commanders. Love this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book how hitler could have won world war two is an excellent piece of history worthy of, well, book history. It tells just how close to tright now I could be speaking German. Very good theme, but at times depressing on pondering if Hitler hadn't made those moronic mistakes!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was fascinating. I found myself shaking my head at how hard it was for Germany to LOSE the war after conquering France in 1940. Just shows that Hitler was as bad a military strategist as he was good a politician. Some of the decisions made by him were so blatently bad you wonder if there were some other forces at work. Highly recommended for both historians and military strategists. Very readable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books I have ever read,it is a must read for any military history buff.
K-E_Moore More than 1 year ago
It's chilling to realize how easily Hitler might have won the Second World War. Although having access to less industry, manpower, and natural resources than his principle opponents (England, USSR, and United States), the amount of military talent that Hitler had at his command was staggering. From the father of blitzkrieg Heinz Guderian to the unpredictable genius of Erwin Rommel, a Hitler that let the military talent at his disposal win the war for him could have ended the 1940s in possession of France, controlling (formerly) British North Africa, siphoning the oil wells of Persia, and holding a dagger to the underbelly of the Soviet Union, a hostage for resources and a free hand... if he didn't decide to simply take the oil and wheat that the Soviet Union so desperately needed. Bevin Alexander does a superb job outlining the dozen or so points at which Hitler, offered victory on a silver platter by his forward-thinking military men, spurned the dish and pressed forward into the disaster that befell him. What, Alexander asks, may have been the result of bagging the British Expeditionary Force instead of letting it go at Dunkirk? Allowing Goering to continue to level sector command centers, crippling Fighter Command at a critical hour? Captured Malta instead of Crete? Gave Rommel his full support and let him close the Suez Canal and squat atop the Persian oil wells, threatening Britain's reinforcement line to North Africa and her most beloved colony, India, in one fell swoop? What if Hitler had settled on one strategic objective in Barbarossa (instead of three) or held back his ideology-driven killers from murdering peasants who loathed Stalin? Allowed Manstein to relieve Paulus at Stalingrad? His generals to lure the Red Army into tactical death traps instead of demanding that they stand and fight? With an unsparing eye, and the caveat that he in no way wishes that Hitler had taken the route to victory, Alexander presents a well-researched study into the way that the man who made the German Army capable of fighting World War II made it impossible for Germany to win. This highly original proposition is sure to encourage many a conversation among minor and major historians alike into one of the most well-known modern war.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
When most people think of WWII they think of the allies' victory with there astonishing man power and there brilliant tactics. What many people don¿t see is that Adolf Hitler made key mistakes that lead to his own demise. This book shows readers just how close we where to losing the war and what Hitler could have done differently to change to outcome. The Author Bevin Alexander asks the question ¿what if¿ and goes behind the strategy of the Nazi empire to point out major mistakes and what they should have done. He asks questions like: why in 1940 did the German panzers stop there advance and let the British to regroup and retreat at Dunkirk? I enjoyed reading this book because it took a new look on WWII and how it could have turned out. The book contains vivid maps that the reader can look to for major battle locations and get a feel for what the landscape was like. I thought that in some parts of the book did drag along and made it hard to read. I would highly recommend this book to anyone that likes WWII stories, and to anyone who wants to learn more on the Nazi¿s attempt to take over the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is recommened to anyone who is interested in history or warfare. This book tells how close the fascist dictator came to winning WWII. It can be very disturbing at times on account of how close we came to losing. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
i have read this book about three times and each time i come across something that i missed and it was all really interesting and makes you think what if hitler would have actually won the war.