IQ (IQ Series #1)

IQ (IQ Series #1)

by Joe Ide

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316449519
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 07/31/2018
Series: IQ Novel Series , #1
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 185,749
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.30(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Joe Ide is of Japanese American descent. Growing up in South Central Los Angeles, Joe's favorite books were the Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes stories. The idea that a person could face the world and vanquish his enemies with just his intelligence fascinated him. Joe went on to earn a graduate degree and had several careers before writing his debut novel, IQ, inspired by his early experiences and his love of Sherlock. Joe lives in Santa Monica, California. Visit his website at www.joeide.com

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IQ 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
From the very first chapter of this book, heck who am I kidding from the first few pages, I was hooked. Loved the past an present used and how likable IQ was as well as the other characters like Dodson. Also loved how real the characters were portrayed. I hope there's a book two!!!! More please!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am hoping it won't be his last. I see some awards coming down the line if he continues. He loves his characters, knows them well, and makes me love them, too. Bravo!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was pleasantly surprised. A lot of the book was a background of the main character so his next book should be even better.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Love the characters and the pace of the book, could not put it down. Great new author, looking forward to the next one, just released i believe. Will keep him on my favorite authors list.
Drewano More than 1 year ago
I just couldn’t get into this book. IQ the character is interesting and, for the most part, is likable. The writing doesn’t present the story well though. IQ just ends up telling us what he’s seen through dialog rather than describing what he is seeing and then letting the reader being able to see it for his/herself and coming up with some conclusions on their own before the reveal. Also a lot of this book is background on IQ so it makes the story feel a bit choppy.
jnmegan More than 1 year ago
In Joe Ide’s novel, IQ , Isaiah Quintabe is a humble genius with a honed talent for observation and deduction combined with some serious street smarts that fuse into a unique, modern-day Sherlock Holmes. IQ helps his fellow inhabitants of South Central LA solve problems of all kinds, with forms of payment for his services that are as variable as the people that comprise his neighborhood. He perfects his craft with the help of his partner, Dodson, who acts as Ide’s version of Watson-but with a criminal, entrepreneurial bent. Dodson enters IQs life after he suffers a major loss, and they live together out of necessity and a shared desire for challenging adventure. At the onset, IQ’s intelligence serves them well as thieves, but their actions soon lead to a tragedy that convinces IQ that he needs to use his abilities to help others. This book is the first of a (hopefully long) series and serves as an introduction to these intriguing characters by convincingly setting up IQ and Dodson’s back stories. The plot also includes a puzzling case involving a rapper and a freakishly large dog that someone is using as an attempted murder weapon. Just when it seems that every possible permutation of the Holmes tradition has already been attempted, Ide provides fans of the genre with another worthy tribute. This novel is his twist on Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous Hound of the Baskervilles, and it is inventive, fun and a refreshing take on a beloved cultural icon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read, little confusing kept me on my toes, plenty of action
gloriafeit More than 1 year ago
From the publisher: East Long Beach. The LAPD is barely keeping up with the neighborhood’s high crime rate. Murders go unsolved, lost children unrecovered. But someone from the neighborhood has taken it upon himself to help solve the cases the police can’t or won’t touch. A high school dropout, Isaiah Quintabe has an unassuming nature that disguises a ferocious intelligence. Most people call him IQ. Word has gotten around: If you’ve got a problem, Isaiah will take care of it, his rates adjustable to your income or lack thereof. Because of his unconventional business model, cash is getting tight for Isaiah, forcing him to take on the case of a rap mogul whose life is in danger. The list of suspects includes a socially inept marksman who never misses, a crew of hangers-on that conceals at one man with a dangerous agenda, and an attack dog the size of a horse. IQ finds his investigation encompassing much more than he bargained for. No one expects a kid from East Long Beach to have what Isaiah’s packing - - a blistering intellect, an incredible sense of percepti9on, and some serous skills behind the wheel. It all adds up to one major advantage: When you come from nothing, nobody sees you coming. This is the first in a very original new series from Joe Ide, an author of Japanese-American descent, who has created an even more original protagonist in IQ, in a book which won the Macavity Award for best first novel. The year is 2013. In the opening pages, we meet Isaiah, an unlicensed detective described as six feet tall and rail thin, his roommate, Juanell Dodson, 17, who has been sharing IQ’s apartment since the death of the latter’s beloved brother, Marcus, 25 years old, in a hit-and-run incident in 2005 which completely devastated IQ. We also meet Juanell’s sometime girlfriend, an innocent teenage girl named Deronda. We are told that IQ had more work than he could handle but not many who could pay him. A client who could “pay his per diem gave him enough income to support himself” but often the only compensation given him would be “with a sweet potato pie or cleaning his yard or one brand-new radial tire if they paid him at all.” In one instance payment came in the form of a chicken named Alejandro. After his brother’s death IQ dropped out of school and quit the academic decathlon team he was on. IQ likes rap because “music without words let him fill his head with images of his own making or no images at all.” Juanell brings IQ a new case, if they can split the fee, the client being one Calvin Wright, a rapper known as Black the Knife. Juanell tells IQ “you lucky you got skills, son, ‘cause if you had to survive on your personality you’d be working at the morgue with dead people.” But the team does just fine. The author creates some fascinating characters here, primarily of course IQ, and a book that won’t soon be forgotten. One of the many glowing reviews of this book [from fellow author Ben Winters] ended with the words “you’ll be as excited as I am for a sequel.” I couldn’t, and can’t, disagree, and when that sequel was published, less than a month ago, I read it as soon as I could, the result of which can be found in the review which will be written as soon as this one concludes – it’s every bit as excellent as is this debut novel and, like this one, is highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
StudentofParables More than 1 year ago
An interesting book! For fans of BBC’s new “modern” Sherlock series, this is one to check out! The similarities between these two stories are most on display in one of my favorite scenes in the book – when IQ goes through the process of learning to see. For those who do not possess a natural eidetic memory, learning to absorb and process a lot of information quickly and accurately is something that takes much focus and practice. We see the end results in Sherlock’s “mind palace”, or, closer to reality, the training of law enforcement officers, but not a lot is ever really said about the process. Sitting with IQ on the edge of the road while he learns this skill is written well, the reader feeling IQ’s frustration and sharing his eventual triumph. The author’s style in this work adds to the overall atmosphere, keeping IQ and the reader working to stay a step ahead. The narrative is told through sets of flashbacks, flash-forwards, and different points of view on same scene – the plot doubling back, twisting and turning on itself. This creates a moving, restless pace for the reader, with a unique tone while the story moves forward. One thing to note, there is a lot of rough language throughout the book. This work is different from normal mystery/thrillers I pick up, but definitely worth a read! I received a review copy of this work from the publisher through NetGalley
Maari More than 1 year ago
Very vivid storyteller! From the beginning, I was drawn into this tale. It started off quite seedy, yet, because of the details, I felt as if I was right there, and I couldn't just walk away from it all! At times this story gets deep, other's, I found humorous. Either way, I was entertained throughout! Thank You, Mr. Ide for writing a different sort of detective tale. I would definitely read more of/about IQ's cases.
MOREMAD More than 1 year ago
If I could - I would give this book a minus 10. Ignorant uneducated foul-mouthed youths and a few older people with NOTHING to say and will NEVER shut up. I want my money back.
Caroles_Random_Life More than 1 year ago
I liked this one. I didn't love it but I liked it well enough. I did seem to take me a little longer to read this book than it usually would and I think that a big reason was that this was a book that was easy for me to set aside. I am really not sure why this story didn't completely hook me but the fact is it just didn't grab me like I wanted. In the end, I found it to be a book that I am glad that I read. This book really told two stories set in two different timelines. I liked the stories that were set in both of the timelines well enough but it did seem to flip back and forth a lot. Isaiah, or IQ, is at the center of both timelines. He isn't a detective or anything official but he has a reputation for being able to solve mysteries. He takes on the case of a rap star whose has found himself in danger which takes him in a lot of exciting directions. The second timeline is set in the past during Isaiah's teenage years when he was learning to get by without the family support he was used to. I didn't feel any real connection to any of the characters. I liked Isaiah but was just starting to feel like we were getting to know him as the story came to an end. I do think that the jumping back and forth in time made it a little harder for me to really feel a connection with the characters. It seemed like as soon as I was starting to get a little hooked on one story, I would turn the page and the book would switch to the other time period. This book did a lot of things well. I thought the actual mystery was nicely plotted. I had a really hard time even coming close to guessing who might actually be responsible for the threat against the rapper. The way that the dogs were used in the story was really very interesting and completely original. I did like the way that Isaiah reasoned through problems. I would recommend this book to mystery fans. Isaiah is an interesting problem solver that I think will appeal to a lot of readers. I received an advance reader edition of this book from Mulholland Books via NetGalley.
Deb-Krenzer More than 1 year ago
I just love this guy Isiah, and don't make me spell his last name, HA! Violence is not his way, he helps people for whatever they can give him and he feels bad for a deal gone bad in his past and takes care of a teenager who lost both of his parents because of that deal. I heard this was going to be a series and I am all for it. IQ is a thinker and just doesn't do anything without thinking everything out. While he may take blueberry muffins from one person for help, if he sees a rolex on your arm, your going to pay some bucks if you want a job done by him. I think the author has a great idea with this and I look forward to seeing where he goes. I definitely enjoyed this book. It does go back and forth a lot, but its pretty easy to follow. Thanks to Mulholland Books and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest review. These are my words and I was not coerced by anyone to write them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Would be nice to have it available on Nook!
Mama_Cat More than 1 year ago
IQ is short for Isaiah Quintabe; it also defines this private detective’s secret weapon, his use of logic to solve mysteries. IQ’s brother Marcus took care of him since their parents’ death when he was still young. When Isaiah was 17, he saw his brother killed by a hit and run driver. After that, he cared little about anything or anyone except to try to keep their apartment and Marcus’ things. He still heard Marcus in his head all the time, telling him how to behave, what to do to help others. In the beginning he took in Dodson, a gang banger from high school to sleep on the sofa and help pay the rent. Someone to commit robberies with and subsequently selling the goods to keep the apartment. Isaiah was the brains behind the robberies, and Dodson the bravado. At least until Dodson got too greedy and stole from him, too. Living honestly now, IQ takes cases that the police won’t or can’t work. Many older people can’t pay him, but he has enough paying cases to pay for his modest East Long Beach home. He needs additional money now to get a house for a young man named Flaco. Flaco, for whom he will do whatever he can forever. Dodson was the one who hooked him up with his current client, a rapper called Black the Knife aka Calvin Wright. To get the job, he had to cut Dodson in on the work and 25% of the money, but I Q was going to keep a close eye on him after what he had done in the past. Cal hadn’t been outside his home for a few weeks. One night he was in his kitchen and a huge, ugly pit bull-looking came in the doggy door, chased him until they were both outside and the oversize drooling fangs yanked off the big man’s robe. Cal ended up in the pool and the dog came in after him, the dog’s handler coming to Cal with a sawed-off shotgun. The only thing saving Cal was the neighbor calling the police on the noise at Cal’s, and the shooter and dog disappeared. For now. Isaiah Quintabe was not a likable teen. True, he was trying to survive and keep a roof over his head, but he used his intelligence to steal, then was furious when his partner stole from him. He grew into a likable adult, one focused on using his intelligence in a way his brother would have appreciated. He was also trying to earn enough money to put a down payment on a place where Flaco could live when he would be released from the group home he was in. I didn’t like Dodson as a teen or an adult. Dodson was out for Dodson, and either used up or wasted whatever he had. Cal and the guys around him were not much better, they just had a lot more money. The guy who was after Cal was shown at different points through the novel; I didn’t like him at all but he wasn’t meant to be likable. It was a while before I could begin to get into this novel. Going back and forth from past to present made enjoying the story difficult; the excessive foul language and gang-slang also kept me from investing appreciably in the story. Unfortunately I was probably halfway through before I really began to appreciate IQ, who he is now, how he uses his logic to find solutions to the mystery and why he cared about Flaco. It was difficult to determine who the bad guy behind the bad guy was, so the author did pen a very challenging mystery. I felt it simply took too many pages to get to the real meat of the novel. I received this galley copy from NetGalley. I am voluntarily providing an honest review; no compensation was received.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I actually enjoyed the story line but the constant switching of years was confusing to me and not in sync
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She sat down in the grass below a big tree, crying her eyeballs out as she hugged herself, rocking.