Leap

Leap

by Jane Breskin Zalben
4.3 8

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Leap 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Krista and Daniel were inseparable from the first day of kindergarten on. Swimming lessons, play dates, they did everything together. Until Valentine's Day in third grade. Krista got a box of chocolates and an unsigned love note. There's no way of knowing for sure who it came from, but Krista is convinced it was Bobby. It almost doesn't really even matter anymore because since that day, Krista has had the crush of her life on Bobby. Two-and-a-half years, and it hasn't gone away, and she's no closer to dating him than she was at the beginning. She should have asked Daniel about it back then, when should have equaled could have, when they were still best friends. But around the beginning of fourth grade it somehow became not cool to be best friends with someone of the opposite sex. So Krista found Sandy and Gina, and Daniel became best friends with Bobby. Krista still has the box and the note, though!

The day after the end of fifth grade changes everything for Daniel, and eventually for Krista, too. Daniel goes to have dental work done, and a freak accident happens. Now he'll need a lot of physical therapy to even get back to being functional. Who knows if he'll ever be able to be a competitive swimmer again? To make matters worse, his dentist was Bobby's dad. Which causes all sorts of problems. Add in his mom's inability to deal with the whole thing, and Daniel's not sure what his future looks like. It's a pretty tough thing to contemplate when you're only in sixth grade.

Krista vows to help her once best friend. But intending to and wanting to help are easier things to say than do. Does helping Daniel mean she's picking him over Bobby? What does helping, or not helping, say about her as a person? Why is it so hard to be around Daniel? How can she talk to him?

This story is a snapshot of a time in life that's hard enough without major obstacles. Figuring out how to relate to the opposite sex is a constant battle that starts around third grade and for some people it doesn't end for the next twenty years! It's made even harder because previous to that it was completely normal to be friends with the people that you don't even know how to talk to now. I still don't know exactly what it is that changes everything. With the accident as an obstacle, it also becomes a story about defining yourself at any age. A person's actions and reactions say a lot about who they are, but they can also easily be misinterpreted.

This book deals with a confusing time in life, but it does so very openly and honestly. It could very easily have gotten depressing, or melodramatic, or lost in a message. Thankfully it never does. Instead you walk away from it feeling like you got a glimpse into life from a full perspective. Like for the first time you got to see the full picture of a piece of time. It's a good thing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a book I hated to hate, but my loathing seemed to grow with every page. It wasn¿t the plot. The plot was unique and thought provoking. Daniel Rosen goes to Dr. Kaufman (the father of one of Daniel¿s friends) for a routine dental procedure¿the removal of an errant tooth¿and, through a freak accident, is paralyzed from the waist down. The accident changes everything for Danny and his family. Krista has been Danny¿s best friend for years but, alas, the changes of sixth grade boy-girl dynamics have come between the two of them. Krista is surrounded by a cadre of friends: Lainie the wannabe movie star, Gina, the tough Italian who answers to no one, and Sandy, the all around girl. They learn a lot about life, relationships, and love based on how they respond to Danny¿s misfortune. The events are recounted alternately through Daniel¿s and Krista¿s perspectives. This story falls down in a couple of critical areas. First, it is syrupy sweet in its description of family and interpersonal interactions. Like a sitcom, members get angry with each other, but quickly make peace and much kissing, hugging, and cuddling ensues. Pesky younger brothers are recognized as the angels they are and teachers are friends who stand with the students against the stupidity of substitutes. Daniel is miraculously¿okay, it involves hard work on his part and the support of his friends--able to swim competitively again. . .and they all lived happily ever after. Second, the story consistently uses anachronistic references that will leave younger readers confused. For example, Krista, this thoroughly modern sixth grader (one who uses cell phones, e-mails, and IM) refers to herself and her friend as Laurel and Hardy. At a party, one of the characters does a Groucho Marx impression. The story is pockmarked with instances of ¿knocking knuckles.¿ The end result is the story is not true to the voices of its characters. Instead, it sounded like an older adult trying to imagine what a sixth grader would feel. It¿s just not believable. There are authors out there who have done a superb job in this area and have done so without obscenity, so it¿s difficult to make allowances even in that area. The only other redeeming feature (besides the plot line) I could find was the inspirational quotation that started every chapter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Krista and Daniel were inseparable from the first day of kindergarten on. Swimming lessons, play dates, they did everything together. Until Valentine's Day in third grade. Krista got a box of chocolates and an unsigned love note. There's no way of knowing for sure who it came from, but Krista is convinced it was Bobby. It almost doesn't really even matter anymore because since that day, Krista has had the crush of her life on Bobby. Two-and-a-half years, and it hasn't gone away, and she's no closer to dating him than she was at the beginning. She should have asked Daniel about it back then, when should have equaled could have, when they were still best friends. But around the beginning of fourth grade it somehow became not cool to be best friends with someone of the opposite sex. So Krista found Sandy and Gina, and Daniel became best friends with Bobby. Krista still has the box and the note, though! The day after the end of fifth grade changes everything for Daniel, and eventually for Krista, too. Daniel goes to have dental work done, and a freak accident happens. Now he'll need a lot of physical therapy to even get back to being functional. Who knows if he'll ever be able to be a competitive swimmer again? To make matters worse, his dentist was Bobby's dad. Which causes all sorts of problems. Add in his mom's inability to deal with the whole thing, and Daniel's not sure what his future looks like. It's a pretty tough thing to contemplate when you're only in sixth grade. Krista vows to help her once best friend. But intending to and wanting to help are easier things to say than do. Does helping Daniel mean she's picking him over Bobby? What does helping, or not helping, say about her as a person? Why is it so hard to be around Daniel? How can she talk to him? This story is a snapshot of a time in life that's hard enough without major obstacles. Figuring out how to relate to the opposite sex is a constant battle that starts around third grade and for some people it doesn't end for the next twenty years! It's made even harder because previous to that it was completely normal to be friends with the people that you don't even know how to talk to now. I still don't know exactly what it is that changes everything. With the accident as an obstacle, it also becomes a story about defining yourself at any age. A person's actions and reactions say a lot about who they are, but they can also easily be misinterpreted. This book deals with a confusing time in life, but it does so very openly and honestly. It could very easily have gotten depressing, or melodramatic, or lost in a message. Thankfully it never does. Instead you walk away from it feeling like you got a glimpse into life from a full perspective. Like for the first time you got to see the full picture of a piece of time. It's a good thing. **Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman