The Little Red Hen

The Little Red Hen

by J. P. Miller

Hardcover(First Random House Edition)

$4.99
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307960306
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 02/28/2001
Series: Little Golden Book Series
Edition description: First Random House Edition
Pages: 24
Sales rank: 1,191
Product dimensions: 6.63(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.18(d)
Age Range: 2 - 5 Years

About the Author

J.P. MILLER (1913-2001) illustrated many Golden Book titles from the 1940s through the 1970s, some written by Margaret Wise Brown and Edith Kunhardt. Before becoming a children's book illustrator, Miller had worked in the Walt Disney Studio's elite Character Modeling Department, creating characters (such as the dwarf Dopey) for Disney's first feature film, Snow White. He later designed the character of the toy maker Geppetto for Pinocchio.

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The Little Red Hen 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 78 reviews.
leah reyes More than 1 year ago
My 4 year old daughter loves this book. She enjoys listening to the story over and over again. This book also brings me back to my favorite childhood stories! We highly recommend it :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a school librarian I've read many versions of this traditional tale. J.P. Miller's delightful illustrations make this my all time favorite! The students delight in the many antics of the characters, all drawn with such great humor and style. Having researched this great illustrator I found he also was one of a few select artists who worked in the creation dept. of Disney in the early days. His work is exceptional, it delighted me as a child and still does as an adult!
Gillian Bushell More than 1 year ago
Love it! A version of the story exactly as I remembered it from childhood - great morals and fun illustrations. Would definitely recommend buying it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My grandkids love it! Nice art and sounds!
Sandra Holzberger More than 1 year ago
Why is this more expensive for nook than it is for the actual book?
Gerardino de Leon More than 1 year ago
Why don't they republish (update) all the Little Golden Books? Bring back the classics!
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a child I can remember being read this story and wondering why red hens friends were so lazy......this was one of my favorite books and I love to read it to my children now.
SandraTX More than 1 year ago
My mother read this to me when I was 5. Almost 40 years ago. The work ethics have stuck with me and I thoroughly enjoy teaching my grandchildren the ethics of work, sharing, cooperation not to mention the great learning process of seeing bread emerge from a simple seed!
Peg0919 More than 1 year ago
A little hen reaps the rewards of her labor and self-reliance. Her capable barnyard colleagues learn that laziness and greed have their consequences. Many adults could learn from this story. The message, "Then I will do it," will stay with children and adults for a lifetime.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book to my students during a lesson and they enjoyed it and the picture was as clear as a written book.
ninamcginn More than 1 year ago
Such a classic been around for years, but still keeps the kid intrested.
Janine Forbes More than 1 year ago
An amazing story of reaping the benefits of hard work. Brings me back to my childhood.
sissy3 More than 1 year ago
I was happy to find this childhood classic to add to my Golden Books collection. It renews the currently politically-minded concept: to whom should the "spoils/bread" go, the one who worked to achieve or to anyone who asks. Also recommend: Mark Levine's book, Libery and Tyranny
SqueakyDB More than 1 year ago
A colorful, classic that we need to keep ciculating.
jennifer.hancock82 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
The classic folk tale of The Little Red Hen comes to life on the pages of this Golden Book. As always the Poor mother hen slaves away planting, sowing, preparing, and baking while the other characters keep to their straight line of, Not I... when asked to help. The classic proverb you reap what you sow applies quite literally to this age old tale. In the end the mother hen certainly gets the last laugh as she and her chicks enjoy the spoils of a job well done while the other farm animals look balefully on. A wonderful moral tale for the ages.Personal Response: I grew up reading the Little Golden Books so the nostalgia of it gets me every time! I hope my own daughter keeps this tradition alive by someday reading classics like this to her own children.Extension: 1) Teaching children the value of working hard instead of hardly working by doing a class garden you could literally teach the kids you reap what you sow. 2) Ask them to make a list of things their own moms do around the house and have them come up with ways they could help out.
Ashleyreece on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Summary:In this story the Little Red Hen ask her friend to help her plant, cut, and grind her wheat. They all refuse to help her. She then asks them to help her bake the grain into bread. Again they refuse. She asks who will help her eat the bread and all her friends shout that they want some of the bread. She says NO and eats the bread all by herself. Personal Reaction: I love this story because the Little Red hen works so hard and at the end she gets the reward she has worked so hard for.Extension 1: I would use this in a lesson about friendship. What does it take to be a good friend? I would have my kids tell me a time when they were not so helpful to their friends and what they could do better next time?Extension 2: I would also use this in a lesson about manners. Was it okay for the hen to not share even though her friends didn¿t help her? I would have the class come up with their own ideas about sharing.
jmvarnad on LibraryThing 4 days ago
I absolutely enjoy this book every time i read it. Little Red Hen is trying to get help from her friends to grow some bread, but they all choose not to help. In the end Little Red Hen chooses not to share her bread with her friends because they did not help grow it. I would use this book to teach my students bout sequence of events, also to show my students that its important to help others.
ryann0423 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
This is a story about a hen who is going to all of her friends asking for help with different tasks required to make some bread. Each friend says "Not I' and will not help her until the bread is ready and she asks "who will help me eat this bread?" then all of her friends want to "help", but she says "No, I will eat it myself!" This story is great in showing kids that if you want the reward you have to be willing to do the work and help others out. It's a book that they children can be involved in while doing a read aloud because you can say and what did the goose says? and they know that the goose said "not I"
mildred981 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
In this fairy tale the little red hen, the setting is on a farm. The protagonist is the little red hen, whom finds some grains of wheat and decides to make bread. She then ask if some of the other farm animals would help her plant, water, pick and bake the wheat. The other farm animals all said no to all the tasks that went along with making the bread. But, when they started to smell the bread baking, they all responded saying "i will help you eat the bread". But the hen said no. Because you did not help with any of the task it took to make the bread. The story theme is developed, when the hen ask the farm animals for help with each task. The story reach it's climax when the bread is cooked and thr aroma is spreading around the farm. Also, The author sets the tone of eageriness by showing the protaganist the hen performing each task by herself. Furthermore, I love this story moral, which is those who do not contribute to the end product, don't deserve to enjoy the end product. This story always motivate my son to do his chores...great book!
mmuncy on LibraryThing 4 days ago
The Little Red Hen would be considered a traditional literature book. I read the Little Golden Book version of the story. It is about a little red hen who finds a grain of wheat and asks other animals to help her plant it. No one will help. After the wheat grows she asks for help to harvest it and then take it to be made into flour, but once again no one will help. She asks for help to make the flour into dough and bake it but again no one wants to help. She then wonders who will help her eat the bread; everyone volunteers but the hen says that she will eat it herself.My girls always feel sorry for the hen when no one will help her. Even on their own, they could see that it wasn¿t fair that the other animals wouldn¿t help the hen with the work, but then wanted to eat the bread.Because this book is written for younger children I would probably have a discussion on helping others. I might also have the students draw a picture of a person that they help.
stharp on LibraryThing 3 months ago
What a fun folk tale to tell children! With Golden books its great because they sum up all the key points into a story that children would have the attention span for! This is a great example of a folk tale because it is a story that has been heard time and time again and heard by many generations. This book follows great plot. The hen tries and tries to give her friends a chance to help her with her wheat, and it keeps the reader guessing for what is going to happen next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this classic Little Golden Book for my 3 year old granddaughter. She loves it. I have had to read it to her several times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago