The London Eye Mystery

The London Eye Mystery

by Siobhan Dowd

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385751841
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Publication date: 05/26/2009
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 72,038
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 7.56(h) x 0.72(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Siobhan Dowd was named one of the "top 100 Irish-Americans" for her global anti-censorship work with the writers’organization PEN America. Siobhan Dowd’s novels include A Swift Pure Cry, for which she was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start author, and Bog Child. She died in August 2007 from breast cancer.

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The London Eye Mystery 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 108 reviews.
teamshallow More than 1 year ago
The London Eye Mystery is about a brother and sister, Kat and Ted, loosing there cousin on the London Eye. Ted, Kat's brother, has a disability called Aspergers Syndrome. Even though Ted has Aspergers Syndrome, doesn't mean anything; he is actually a giant part of the book. Ted's brain works different; but that's how they find Salem. The author, Siobhan Dowd, keeps you on the edge of your seat through the whole book; after every chapter you want to keep reading it. She puts a nice visual picture in your head of what's going on in the book. If you are interested in mystery books then the London Eye Mystery would be perfect for you. This book could definitely teach you a lesson like, not to except stuff from strangers. I read this book in class, but after every time we read it I wanted to take it home and read it. I think this book deserves a five star rating 100%. Something that I don't really like about this book is that it keeps you wanting to read it all day!
Twinkle14 More than 1 year ago
The London Eye Mystery is mainly about a boy named Ted. He has Asperser's Syndrome. Ted is good at remembering things. Whenever Ted's cousin Salim ran off somewhere, he uses his background knowledge to figure where Salim went. When Ted is disappointed at his older sister Kat he calls her bad names like Catastrophe, Cataclysm, and Catatonic. When our reading/language arts class read it the story started off not interesting then at the end its get really interesting. This book is a mystery book. The author's writing style is that the author is trying to combine the mystery and fiction. I like book because it has many mysteries and family types for example: the arguing. This book was awarded for the "Best Children's Book." I would rate this as a 5 star.
cal43096 More than 1 year ago
The London Eye Mystery is all about a family get together going horribly wrong. Ted is an average guy, but the one thing that you might find is that he has Asperser's Syndrome. On a perfectly fine day at the London Eye, Kat, Ted, and Salim go on the big bike wheel in the sky, but a mysterious man comes up and offers Salim a ticket. After the London Eye is done going around, Salim doesn't come out. Ted, the main character uses his good memory to find Salim. This book teaches a good lesson about not stereotyping, and not always having adults doing the work. One of the things I liked about this book is that it teaches a good lesson about not always having adults doing the work. This book would fall under the category of realistic fiction/ mystery. This book won the 2008 School library best book of the year award. Five stars is my opinion for this book, with two thumbs up.
conwayeast More than 1 year ago
The London Eye Mystery is a realistic page turning novel. The author, Siobhan Dowd has a cool way of writing; she takes her time to explain special details. Ted has Aspersers syndrome and can see things that others don't. You really have to think about the theme "how can or how does an ability become a disability?" This book takes place in London, a place for mysteries. His sister is a trouble maker. All hell has broken lose in their house. Salim is Ted's cousin and he has mysteriously vanished. So Ted and his sis decide to do some investigating on their own. And the end is one of the best parts, and its gets tied together very well. I'd give this book eight out of 10 they uncover something big. read The London Eye Mystery to find out.
MoneyDM More than 1 year ago
The London Eye mystery is about a kid named Ted who has a disability, aspergers syndrome. Ted uses it to his ability to find his cousin, who vanishes after a trip to the London Eye. The main characters are Ted, Kat, and Sailm and his mother Glo. Siobhan Dowd has a different writing style then the other writers. The author makes you stop and wonder what is happening and makes you have an image in your head. And she is very inspiring. She makes you wonder why someone how would wont to read. This book disserves a 4 to 5 star rating because this book got a little slow in the book at the begging. This book should be read by a 7th grader though 10th grader. School Library Journal Best Books of the Year.
MandySW More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed listening to the audio of THE LONDON EYE MYSTERY by Siobhan Dowd (Brilliance Audio, 2008) and think it is perfect fast-paced mystery for a tween audience. In the story, Ted, Kat, and family were not prepared for the storm that followed when "Hurricane Aunt Gloria" and her son Salim blew into town. Salim had set his sights on riding the London Eye before he and his mom moved overseas to New York. The perfect opportunity presented itself when a mysterious stranger offered his ticket to Salim. Ted and Kat sat back and watched their excited cousin Salim board the Eye, but they became worried when he never got off. This simple Ferris wheel ride turns into a roller coaster style investigation as various characters share theories, accusations, lies, and their involvement in Salim's disappearance. Ted, with the unusual way his brain thinks, works along side with his sister Kat and her gift of gab, to prove that "what comes up must come down." Young readers who have an "eye" for mystery will not be able to resist this story and will enjoy riding along side with unlikely duo Ted and Kat as they search for clues and answers to what happened to their cousin Salim. (2009 Best Books for Young Adults)
The_hibernators More than 1 year ago
When Ted and Kat's cousin Salim mysteriously disappears while riding the London Eye they team up to find him. Ted and Kat never got along in the past because Ted has Asperger's Syndrome and is difficult to relate to; however, they discover that a combination of his rational thinking skills and her intuitive action makes them an ideal team. It may be because I've OD'd myself on Autism books this April, but I wasn't overly impressed by this story. I don't regret reading it--it was a cute story, and handled the issue of Ted's Asperger's symptoms well enough. But I didn't feel a strong attachment to the characters. I also felt that the mystery (and the way it was solved at the very, very end) lacked verisimilitude. I understand why the frantic parents didn't listen to what the kids had to say...but I felt that the cops should have given the kids a much more rigorous questioning, considering that the kids were the key witnesses to a rather suspicious event. I felt that the kids endangered themselves unnecessarily when trying to solve the mystery. I prefer it when books develop a plot such that the kids MUST do what they do, rather than it just being reckless behavior. But maybe that's because I didn't have that sort of fearless independence when I was a kid. I would have MADE the adults listen to me, instead. :) But like I said, I think I'm just OD'd on fantastic Autism books right now and so this one just wasn't what I needed at the moment. Final recommendation: read it if it's convenient, but don't rush out to get it.
Sagabeast More than 1 year ago
This book takes place in London, a place of dreams. If you're a mystery kind of person, then this book will be great for you. One thing I like about this book is that Ted and Kat's cousin, Salem, vanishes on the London Eye. Ted has Aspergers syndrome meaning Ted's brain runs on its own unique operating system. It's just that Ted has a great mind and he is great at putting together clues. One thing I don't like about this book is that they could have connected all the evidence like the clues in the beginning in the book leads to the end of the book. I give this book a four star rating. This book has won six awards. One of them is a school library journal, best book of the year.
SireKK More than 1 year ago
Ted is like most kids, but he has something that some kids don't have called aspergers syndrome. With this ability, Ted and his sister Kat try to find their cousin Salim who disappeared at the London Eye. The London Eye Mystery is a mystery and a realistic fiction book written Siobhan Dowd, who has a great writing style. She wrote The London Eye Mystery in first person and creates good background knowledge about autism and aspergers syndrome. I would rate this book a five star book for the great details and vivid imagery. The London Eye Mystery won the Best Children's Book Award, the Horn Book Fanfare Award, and many more.
Endo232 More than 1 year ago
"It depends on how you look at it." Aunt Gloria comes to London with her son Salim to visit their relatives. They plan on going on the London eye so they go and there moms just let the kids go. So there waiting in line and a strange guy comes up to them to give them a ticket so ted and Kat just let Salim go up because he has never been up. Ted and Kat wait for him to come back down and he has vanished he doesn't come out. It has all gone. About a mystery of child that goes missing. I would give this book five out of five because this is an outstanding book. If you like Intensity you would love this book.
MandaAS More than 1 year ago
My name is Ted, I am diagnosed with aspergers syndrome. Recently my cousins came and visited. I became very comfortable around my cousin Salim. I found out a lot of interesting things about him. When he mysteriously disappeared, everyone was in complete panic mode. Crying, searching, and hoping for him to return. You will come to see that my 'disability' is actually a 'gift' I think people who are interested in mystery stories with a little bit of drama will love this book. This book kept me at the edge of my seat, and it will easily keep you there too. The London Eye Mystery is a very intriguing and shocking story. There is a lot of twists and bends in the story. Siobhan Dowd's writing is very detailed, and puts a very clear picture in your head. I would definitely give this book a five star.
J-A-R More than 1 year ago
The best part of The London Eye Mystery is that it is very mysterious . This book teaches you many things such as to expect the unexpected and be aware of your surroundings. No, I wouldn't recommend this book to a friend because to much was writtena about the weather. Even though this author wrote five other books I wouldn't read them. I was very disappointed by this book because it talked mostly about the weather. If it talked less about the weather and more about what the story was really about I think it would be more interesting. It was also a little difficult to understand because the English spoken in London is different then some of the words we use in America.
cbl_tn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Readers of all ages can enjoy this heart-warming juvenile mystery. An autistic boy and his sister form a new bond as they team up to search for their missing cousin, who disappeared while riding the London Eye. Each sibling contributes unique strengths to the search. Ted notices patterns and remembers details. His sister, Kat, is sensitive to non-verbal cues and helps Ted understand the psychological aspects of the problem. Issues addressed include parent/child relationships, sibling relationships involving both children and adults, autism, ethnic differences/racial attitudes, divorce, and relocation. The author uses Ted's interest in meteorology to weave facts about weather throughout the book in a way that enhances the story without seeming forced. I listened to the audio version while cooking and cleaning, and it kept me looking for more tasks to do so I didn't have to stop the recording. Highly recommended.
Mo98 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Very good book and intresting it has a lot of action too
elizabethholloway on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Ted knows he is hard-wired a bit differently from other people. He has had to have someone teach him to read emotions on other people's faces; he doesn't understand jokes; he never lies; he loves systems and patterns. In fact, Ted wants to be a meteorologist, where he can use patterns to predict weather. Kat, his sister, is completely different. She is impetuous, adventurous, and not always honest. However, the two must work together when their visiting cousin disappears while on the London Eye, a Ferris wheel-like ride with enclosed capsules. Their cousin goes up but never reemerges. Kat's determination and willingness to break the rules allows Ted to gather enough clues that with his acute understanding of patterns and probability, he is able to solve the mystery.The mystery element is solid. But beyond the mystery, the book is successful in its presentation of character and family dynamics as well. Told in first person, the book allows the readers to see the world through Ted's eyes and get a sense of his limitations and his talents. Even with his more limited ability to read emotions, we can also see his family's frustrations. In addition, we also see the issues his cousin, Salim, faces as a result of his parents' divorce and his mother's self-involvement. This is a satisfying mystery and an insightful look at issues many families face. This book is appropriate for grades 5 to 8.
dominirose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One sentence separates this from being a elementary read. Revealing glimpse into autism through first person narrative.
59Square on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is so different from Bog Child, but equally good. Ted has Asberger's Syndrome and lives with his family in London. His aunt and cousin come to visit on their move to New York, and the cousin, Salim, really wants to go up in the London Eye. When he does, he disappears. Ted and his older sister Kat try to solve the mystery, but there are successes and challenges due to Ted's condition. For instance, he can't read body language, but sometimes words people say will trigger something in him that gives him a clue. The novel is told through Ted' voice, which makes the book very interesting. It's a pity Dowd has died - her books are so diverse, but rewarding. I would have loved to have read another book in Ted's voice.
delphica on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a middle reader, the mystery of the title is the disappearance of a young boy in London. The book presented from the point of view of the boy's cousin, who has Asperger's.I've read a few books lately with protagonists somewhere on the Asperger's/autism spectrum, and I especially enjoyed this one because I felt like it was a consistent and believable way to show a main character who has an outlook that is different while not being debilitating. The consistency part was huge for me, there have been some other recent titles where I felt that the characters' Asperger's manifested in a way that was the most convenient for whatever was needed to move the plot forward at that moment. I also liked that Ted, the narrator, wasn't granted super mystery-solving powers as a result of Asperger's -- he and his sister worked together to figure things out, and each of them had some ideas that panned out, and others that didn't.The other nice thing about this is that it was a stalwart middle reader -- the mystery is mysterious, the kids are realistic, it's a fairly serious topic (missing family member!) but there are some moments of levity -- but it's not TOO anything, it's not too graphic or disturbing or even too philosophical.
The_Hibernator on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Ted and Kat's cousin Salim mysteriously disappears while riding the London Eye they team up to find him. Ted and Kat never got along in the past because Ted has Asperger's Syndrome and is difficult to relate to; however, they discover that a combination of his rational thinking skills and her intuitive action makes them an ideal team. It may be because I've OD'd myself on Autism books this April, but I wasn't overly impressed by this story. I don't regret reading it--it was a cute story, and handled the issue of Ted's Asperger's symptoms well enough. But I didn't feel a strong attachment to the characters. I also felt that the mystery (and the way it was solved at the very, very end) lacked verisimilitude. I understand why the frantic parents didn't listen to what the kids had to say...but I felt that the cops should have given the kids a much more rigorous questioning, considering that the kids were the key witnesses to a rather suspicious event. I felt that the kids endangered themselves unnecessarily when trying to solve the mystery. I prefer it when books develop a plot such that the kids MUST do what they do, rather than it just being reckless behavior. But maybe that's because I didn't have that sort of fearless independence when I was a kid. I would have MADE the adults listen to me, instead. :) But like I said, I think I'm just OD'd on fantastic Autism books right now and so this one just wasn't what I needed at the moment. Final recommendation: read it if it's convenient, but don't rush out to get it.
smik on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Kat and Ted's Aunt Gloria is coming to London to stay with her sister Faith on her way to New York. She has her son Salim with her, and they decide to take Salim to ride the London Eye, the giant Millenium wheel. The queue is very long and they jump at the chance when they are offered a ticket that enables Salim to get on the ride almost immediately. While the mothers have a coffee, Kat and Ted watch Salim's capsule rise into the air. The ride takes exactly 30 minutes and when the passengers get off, Salim is not amongst them. How can he have disappeared?This story is told through Ted's eyes. We know right from the beginning that Ted is a little different. He has some sort of syndrome, his family says his brain is like a super computer, and he is preoccupied with facts and figures and the weather. Ted asks the questions that others won't ask, sometimes because it would be impolite, but Ted always wants to know why things happen. True to form Ted comes up with nine theories about how Salim disappeared. The adults aren't much interested in Ted's theories particularly after the police are involved. But in the long run it is Ted who works out by his own peculiar logic what has happened.I read this book because of a recommendation on one of the lists I belong to. It was only as I began reading that it dawned on me that it isn't adult crime fiction, but a book written for teenagers, and probably the younger end of that spectrum. That doesn't mean that an adult won't enjoy it though. It reminded me of Mark Haddon's THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT TIME. Like that book, THE LONDON EYE MYSTERY, sends the reader away feeling that you have a better understanding of young people like Ted.My rating: 4.2You might remember the other day that the book sent me scurrying off to research Millenium Wheels. A gem that I gleaned then was "Unlike the London wheel, passengers will be able to board from both sides of the Beijing attraction. " The fact that passengers leave and enter the capsules through the same door on the London Eye is an important clue.When I went to research the author Siobhan Dowd, I found that she has 4 published novels:A Swift Pure Cry (2006)Solace of the Road (2007)The London Eye Mystery (2007)Bog Child (2008)A PURE SWIFT CRY was nominated in the Carnegie Medal Best Novel category.At her website I also found this :Siobhan Dowd passed away on Tuesday 21st August 2007.A trust has been set up in Siobhan's name to manage all the proceeds from her literary work. The aim of the Siobhan Dowd Trust will be to help disadvantaged children to improve their reading skills and experience the joy of reading. It will offer financial support to: public libraries; state school libraries (especially in economically challenged areas); children in care; asylum seekers; young offenders and children with special needs.Her 5th book SOLACE OF THE ROAD is due to be published in February 2009.Read the first chapter of THE LONDON EYE MYSTERY online.
BookishRuth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
What goes up must come down ¿ unless you¿re Ted Sparks¿ cousin Salim.Aunt Gloria and her teenage son Salim are preparing to move from Manchester, England to New York City. Before they leave for the United States, Gloria wants to visit her sister and her family in London. Salim has never been to London so his cousins Ted and Katrina are eager to show him the sights.They decide to visit one of Ted¿s favorite places, the London Eye. The London Eye, also called the Millennium Wheel, is the tallest ferris wheel in Europe. When they arrive at the Eye, there¿s a long line for tickets. After a stranger approaches Ted, Kat and Salim to offer his ticket, the kids decide that Salim should take it and "fly the Eye" on his own. Ted and Kat track Salim's capsule during its half hour ride, but when the capsule comes down and people file out, Salim is nowhere in sight. Was he kidnapped? Did he run away? Did he spontaneously combust (one of Ted's eight theories)?After their parents contact the police, Ted and Kat decide to launch their investigation into their cousin¿s disappearance. Ted has Asperger¿s Syndrome, a form of high-functioning autism. Since his brain works on a ¿different operating system¿, Kat and Ted think they may have an advantage over the police investigators. Can Ted¿s unique perspective help them find Salim before it¿s too late?I found The London Eye Mystery to be an interesting, fast read. It is not without some flaws, however. Ted and Kat withhold vital evidence from their parents and the police (such as Salim¿s camera and information about the stranger who gave Salim his ticket). I couldn¿t get past my disbelief that they withheld so much evidence when their cousin was in a dangerous situation.Some of the British slang used throughout the book may be challenging for young American readers. I had no trouble with it, but a glossary like the one included in Louise Rennison¿s Georgia Nicholson series would have been a nice touch for the American edition.Where The London Eye Mystery really shines, though, is in the character of Ted Sparks. Ted is a fascinating, sympathetic character. His Asperger¿s Syndrome was well-portrayed and consistent with what I know of Asperger¿s. Dowd did an effective job of showing how Ted deals with his social challenges. Dowd also showcased the positive aspects of Asperger¿s Syndrome: Ted is extremely intelligent, honest and free of prejudice. It's obvious that a lot of research was put into his character. The London Eye Mystery was worth reading for Ted¿s characterization alone.
librariankristin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A young boy gets on the London Eye alone and doesn't get off when the ride is over, much to the surprise of his cousins, who are waiting for him below. Siblings Ted, who has Asperger's snydrome, and Kat work together to solve the mystery of where Salim went. Reader's will work to solve this intriguing mystery alongside Ted and Kat.
verbafacio on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The mystery of "The London Eye Mystery" is the disappearance of a 13-year-old boy who gets on the London Eye and never gets off. In the end, the resolution isn't so mysterious, though it does keep you guessing. What really makes this book a good read, though, is the narrator, Ted, who has Asperger's syndrome. Although his disease is never named, it is pretty clear that he views the world through a different lens. Ted's charming, awkward interactions with family and police bring an added depth to this quick mystery.
sweetiegherkin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When Londoner Ted¿s 13-year-old cousin Salim comes visiting from Manchester, the first thing he wants to see is the London Eye. Twelve-year-old Ted and his teen-aged sister Kat watch Salim¿s progress as he goes up the London Eye but when the 30-minute ride ends, Salim doesn¿t disembark. A police investigation to find the missing Salim soon commences, while Ted and Kat try to track down clues on their own. Reminiscent of Mark Haddon¿s The Curious Incident of Dog in the Night-Time but for a younger audience, the mystery unfolds through the eyes of Ted, who has Asperger¿s syndrome. Dowd treats Ted¿s syndrome sympathetically, with adult characters pointing out that Ted¿s brain is wired differently but also noting that his analytical skills are the best in the family for theorizing what may have happened to Salim. However, Ted lacks people skills, but this is where Kat flourishes and helps in finding additional clues. Ted¿s first-person narration may even help readers learn something as he hears metaphors and then explains why they are used despite not being literally true. In addition, Ted is highly interested in meteorology and provides detailed, scientific explanations about the weather patterns he observes, again giving young readers the opportunity to learn something while invested in the mystery. American readers may get stumped occasionally by the use of British slang, but the compelling narrative and engaging characters will have children theorizing and trying to put clues in place right alongside Ted and Kat.
chinquapin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Ted and Kat's Aunt Gloria and their cousin Salim come to visit them in London right before their planned move to New York City. They decide to take a ride on the London Eye. Due to strange set of circumstances, the kids end up with one free ticket and they send Salim up in the ride by himself. Ted and Kat watch him board into the sealed capsule, but then he never comes down. The adults and police do not seem to be making much headway in finding Salim, so Ted and Kat start their own investigations. Ted has Asperger's Syndrome and his different type of thinking which he self-describes as "having a different type of operating system" helps him to notice and see what others don't and figure out what happened. His sister, Kat, helps him to understand the people around him and what they are really saying and their body language and expressions. This was such an enjoyable kids' mystery. The story was puzzling and compelling. I wanted to figure out how Salim disappeared. Ted was a great narrator, and I loved his visualizations of idioms that he struggled to understand such as "the atmosphere was so thick you could cut it with a knife," and "it's no skin off my teeth." He was kind of fixated on the weather and knew a lot about it, so there was a lot of weather information in the story as well. It was an interesting look at how Asperger's Syndrome can affect a person's thinking.