Long Day's Journey into Night
Long Day's Journey into Night

Long Day's Journey into Night

by Eugene O'Neill

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780780736283
Publisher: Perfection Learning Corporation
Publication date: 03/26/2013
Product dimensions: 4.80(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author


Eugene O’Neill (1888-1953), the father of American drama, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama four times and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1936. Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University and Berg Professor of English at New York University, is the author of many books, including The Western Canon, The Anxiety of Influence and, most recently, How to Read and Why.

What People are Saying About This

Harold Bloom

By common consent, Long Day's Journey into Night is Eugene O'Neill's masterpiece. . . . The helplessness of family love to sustain, let alone heal, the wounds of marriage, of parenthood, and of sonship, have never been so remorselessly and so pathetically portrayed, and with a force of gesture too painful ever to be forgotten by any of us.
(— Harold Bloom, from the foreword)

Jose Quintero

Only an artist of O'Neill's extraordinary skill and perception can draw the curtain on the secrets of his own family to make you peer into your own. Long Day's Journey into Night is the most remarkable achievement of one of the world's greatest dramatists.
(— Jose Quintero)

Barbara Gelb

The play is an invaluable key to its author's creative evolution. It serves as the Rosetta Stone of O'Neill's life and art.
(— Barbara Gelb)

Customer Reviews

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Long Day's Journey Into Night 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
whitewavedarling on LibraryThing 5 days ago
Maybe the most intimate and autobiographical of O'Neill's plays, his mastery is as clear here as it is in his other work. In the space of a summer home and with a single family as not only the focus, but the only cast (aside from one servant), this work is both powerful and heartwrenching. Tinged with both poetry and humor, this journey is worth reading for any mature reader. As always, O'Neill's style also makes his plays easier to read than many other dramas--this one, especially, since the cast is so small. Absolutely recommended.
cmbohn on LibraryThing 5 days ago
The Tyrones - mother, father, and two sons - spend a day more or less together in the country. Within the course of that day, we see all sorts of nasty little secrets that were only suggested in the first act.This is the first O'Neill play I have read, and I have to say that I found it excellent. Not much fun, but really well done. The theme, to me, was that of excuses, excuses. The entire family has someone - someone else, that is - to blame for being the way they are. Mary blames her husband, her dead son, Edmund, life in general, not having her own house, her circumstances. Tyrone senior blames his difficult childhood, his lost chances. Both sons blame their parents. But in the end, every character admits the truth of why they are the way they are.Every character except Mary. Despite many chances to admit the truth - she is a drug addict - she denies to the very end. And it is the difference between the men in the play, with their ultimate honesty, and Mary's self-deception that makes me angry with her and feel empathy for the others.There is a chance, a small one, but still a chance, that Edmund will get well, that Tyrone will stop drinking, that Jamie will branch out on his own. But Mary is stuck where she is, dreaming and lying through her life.Like I said, this wasn't exactly a fun play, but it was extremely realistic. Very well done and highly recommended.
391 on LibraryThing 5 days ago
I really like the structure of this play - how the story unfolds in the tiniest bits and pieces, edging along so that you never quite know what's entirely going on until the end of the play. Mary's addiction was heartbreaking, as were her confessions about what she felt drove her to them, and each of the other character's stories really broke my heart. It felt like they all hated the decisions they had made in the past, but couldn't repent them or change their direction - Tyrone would always be a tightwad, James wouldn't change his self-destructive nature, Edmund couldn't do anything for himself and didn't even try to.
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I'm not really into plays, but this play had a very interesting plot that I would recommend everyone to read!
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Calidus More than 1 year ago
i enjoyed reading this book. it's a play so it's a short and easy read. it was interesting to see how this family acted with each other. it was sad but had some truth in it :D
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw this play with my grandmother this summer at the Plymouth Theatre on Broadway. It starred Venessa Redgrave, Brian Dennehy, Phillip Seymour Hoffman & Sean Patrick Leanard. I was probably the only person there under 21 yet I enjoyed this play SO much, I went to the bookstore immediately after viewing it and bought not only a copyof this, but a copy of two other O'neill books. He is by far the greatest playwrite of all time and this is his true Magnum Opus. I felt it so easy to be drawn into this and truly connect with each and every character. Quite possibly the best piece of literature ever written.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Long Day's Journey Into Night is the greatest play I have ever read, and Eugene O'Neill is greatest playwriter of all time.