Lunch Money

Lunch Money

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780689866852
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date: 06/26/2007
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 41,869
Product dimensions: 7.68(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.59(d)
Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular Frindle. More than 10 million copies of his books have been sold, and he has been nominated for a multitude of state awards, including two Christopher Awards and an Edgar Award. His popular works include About Average, Troublemaker, Extra Credit, Lost and Found, No Talking, Room One, Lunch Money, and more. He is also the author of the Benjamin Pratt & the Keepers of the School series. He lives with his wife in Maine and has four grown children. Visit him at AndrewClements.com.

Brian Selznick is the author and illustrator of the bestselling The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal and was a National Book Award finalist. He is also the illustrator of many books for children, including Frindle and Lunch Money by Andrew Clements, as well as the Doll People trilogy by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Selznick divides his time between Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 2: Quarters

It was near the end of his fifth-grade year. Around eleven thirty one morning during silent reading Greg felt hungry, so he had started to think about his lunch: a ham-and-cheese sandwich, a bag of nacho cheese Doritos, a bunch of red grapes, and an apple-cherry juice box.

His mom had made him a bag lunch, which was fine with Greg. Making a lunch was a lot cheaper than buying one, and Greg loved saving money whenever possible. Plus home food was usually better than school food. And on days he brought a bag lunch his mom also gave him fifty cents to buy dessert. Which was also fine with Greg. Sometimes he bought a treat, and sometimes he held on to the money. On this particular day he had been planning to spend both quarters on an ice-cream sandwich.

Then Greg remembered where his lunch was: at home on the kitchen counter. He did have a dollar of his own money in his wallet, and he had two quarters from his mom in his front pocket, but a whole school lunch cost two bucks. He needed two more quarters.

So Greg had walked to the front of the classroom, waited until his teacher looked up from her book, and then said, "Mrs. McCormick, I left my lunch at home. May I borrow fifty cents?"

Mrs. McCormick had not missed a teaching opportunity in over twenty years. So she shook her head, and in a voice loud enough for the whole class to hear, she said, "I'm sorry, but no, I will not lend you money. Do you know what would happen if I handed out fifty cents to all the boys and girls who forgot their lunches? I'd go broke, that's what. You need to learn to remember these things for yourself."

Then, turning to the class, Mrs. McCormick had announced, "Greg needs some lunch money. Can someone lend him fifty cents?"

Over half of the kids in the class raised a hand.

Embarrassed, Greg had hurried over to Brian Lemont, and Brian handed him two quarters.

"Thanks," Greg said. "Pay you back tomorrow."

Ten minutes later Greg was in the cafeteria line, shaking all four quarters around in his pocket. They made a nice clinking sound, and that had reminded Greg how much he liked quarters. Stack up four, and you've got a dollar. Stack up twenty quarters, and that's five dollars. Greg remembered one day when he had piled up all his quarters on his dresser — four stacks, and each had been over a foot tall. Stacking up quarters like that always made Greg feel rich.

So on that day in April of his fifth-grade year, Greg had started looking around the cafeteria, and everywhere he looked, he saw quarters. He saw kids trading quarters for ice-cream sandwiches and cupcakes and cookies at the dessert table. He saw kids over at the school store trading quarters for neon pens and sparkly pencils, and for little decorations like rubber soccer balls and plastic butterflies to stick onto the ends of those new pencils. He saw Albert Hobart drop three quarters into a machine so he could have a cold can of juice with his lunch. Kids were buying extra food, fancy pens and pencils, special drinks and snacks. There were quarters all over the place, buckets of them.

And then Greg remembered those hands that had been raised back in his classroom, all those kids who'd had a couple of quarters to lend him — extra quarters.

Excited, Greg had started making some calculations in his head — another one his talents. There were about 450 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders at Ashworth Intermediate School. If even half of those kids had two extra quarters to spend every day, then there had to be at least four hundred quarters floating around the school. That was a hundred dollars a day, over five hundred dollars each week — money, extra money, just jingling around in pockets and lunch bags!

At that moment Greg's view of school changed completely and forever. School had suddenly become the most interesting place on the planet. Because young Greg Kenton had decided that school would be an excellent place to make his fortune.

Text copyright 2005 by Andrew Clements

Illustrations copyright 2005 by Brian Selznick

Reading Group Guide

Discussion Topics
What is Greg's greatest talent? How does he earn money? Do you like to earn money? How do you earn money? What do you do with your money?
In Chapter 2, what discovery does Greg make about quarters? What happens when he tries to sell candy and toys at school? Is Principal Davenport correct in her actions? Explain your answer.
What does Greg sell at the beginning of sixth grade? Describe how he learned to create this product over the summer. Would you have been willing to work so hard to make something to sell? What does this tell you about Greg?
What competition do Chunky Comics face? Who creates the competition? Describe the relationship between these characters in the first half of the novel.
What does Mr. Z like about numbers? What happens when he sees Maura give Greg a bloody nose? How does Mr. Z feel about Greg's situation? What role does math play in his analysis?
When they finally have a serious discussion about comics, what does Greg realize about Maura? What does Maura realize about Greg? How does Mr. Z analyze Greg's claim that Maura "stole" his idea? What happens when the two sixth graders begin to work together?
How did Mr. Z choose his job? What do Mr. Z's comments about wealth and careers make Greg wonder about his get-rich goal?
Why does Mrs. Davenport call comic books "practically toys, and bad toys at that"? Is she correct to extend her selling ban to comic books?
Why is Chapter 16 entitled "Art and Money"? Compare and contrast Maura's goal in creating comic books with Greg's. Which character thinks most like you?
What do Maura and Greg realize about things being sold at school? What case do they make to the school committee? What is Mrs. Davenport's opposing argument?
How is the Chunky Comics problem resolved at Ashworth Intermediate? Is this a good solution? Would you participate in such a venture at your school? What might you call your store or website? What ideas might you bring to the project?
Is getting rich a primary goal for you? Why or why not? What future goals are important to you? If you had a lot of money, how would you choose to spend it?
Activities and Research
At the library or online, find several definitions for money. Individually, or with friends or classmates, make a list of synonyms for, words related to, and phrases incorporating the word "money." Are your lists long or short? Were they difficult to brainstorm, or quick and easy? Why do you think this is the case?
Review the moments in the story where Greg and Maura compete to make money. Have you ever been in a similar contest? What was the result? Write a short story in which you find yourself up against another kid in a money-making venture.
Make your own comic book. In addition to the information provided in the novel, consult Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud or So, You Wanna Be a Comic Book Artist? by Philip Amara. Share your comic with family members or friends.
Study selling. Individually or in groups, list corporate logos, promotions, and other types of selling you see at school. Note the number of commercials in an hour of television. Keep a journal of corporate sales efforts at your local library, on sports fields, or elsewhere in your community. Display your observations on an informative poster. Discuss or write about how all this selling makes you feel. Is it okay with you? Why or not? How might things change for the better?
Imagine Greg and Maura have asked for your help with their school committee presentation. Use PowerPoint or another computer program to create a presentation based on the arguments made in the novel, adding suggestions and ideas of your own. Give your presentation to friends or classmates.
Assign roles of school committee members, administrators, and parents to your classmates or friends. Then improvise the conversation after Greg and Maura have left the school committee meeting. What points do members feel the kids made? Why do comic sales still pose a school problem? What about future sales proposals from other kids or schools? How do parents feel about this dilemma? How can a principal keep money-making from getting out of hand? Based on your improvisation, write an additional chapter to add to Lunch Money.
Imagine you are Greg or Maura near the end of the story. In the character of Greg, write a journal entry about your changing attitudes toward making money. Or, in the character of Maura, write a journal entry about your changing reasons for making comics.
Write a newspaper article about the success of Chunky Comics two years later. What has happened to Greg and Maura? How have their dreams changed? Upon what new adventures have they embarked?
Do you have a great idea for something to make and sell? Write a plan, including a sketch of your product, its name, and how you will sell it. What will your product cost to make, for how much will you sell it, and what profit do you hope to earn? What will you do with your earnings?

Introduction

Discussion Topics

What is Greg's greatest talent? How does he earn money? Do you like to earn money? How do you earn money? What do you do with your money?

In Chapter 2, what discovery does Greg make about quarters? What happens when he tries to sell candy and toys at school? Is Principal Davenport correct in her actions? Explain your answer.

What does Greg sell at the beginning of sixth grade? Describe how he learned to create this product over the summer. Would you have been willing to work so hard to make something to sell? What does this tell you about Greg?

What competition do Chunky Comics face? Who creates the competition? Describe the relationship between these characters in the first half of the novel.

What does Mr. Z like about numbers? What happens when he sees Maura give Greg a bloody nose? How does Mr. Z feel about Greg's situation? What role does math play in his analysis?

When they finally have a serious discussion about comics, what does Greg realize about Maura? What does Maura realize about Greg? How does Mr. Z analyze Greg's claim that Maura "stole" his idea? What happens when the two sixth graders begin to work together?

How did Mr. Z choose his job? What do Mr. Z's comments about wealth and careers make Greg wonder about his get-rich goal?

Why does Mrs. Davenport call comic books "practically toys, and bad toys at that"? Is she correct to extend her selling ban to comic books?

Why is Chapter 16 entitled "Art and Money"? Compare and contrast Maura's goal in creating comic books with Greg's. Which character thinks most like you?

What do Maura and Greg realize about things being sold at school? What case do they make to the schoolcommittee? What is Mrs. Davenport's opposing argument?

How is the Chunky Comics problem resolved at Ashworth Intermediate? Is this a good solution? Would you participate in such a venture at your school? What might you call your store or website? What ideas might you bring to the project?

Is getting rich a primary goal for you? Why or why not? What future goals are important to you? If you had a lot of money, how would you choose to spend it?

Activities and Research

At the library or online, find several definitions for money. Individually, or with friends or classmates, make a list of synonyms for, words related to, and phrases incorporating the word "money." Are your lists long or short? Were they difficult to brainstorm, or quick and easy? Why do you think this is the case?

Review the moments in the story where Greg and Maura compete to make money. Have you ever been in a similar contest? What was the result? Write a short story in which you find yourself up against another kid in a money-making venture.

Make your own comic book. In addition to the information provided in the novel, consult Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud or So, You Wanna Be a Comic Book Artist? by Philip Amara. Share your comic with family members or friends.

Study selling. Individually or in groups, list corporate logos, promotions, and other types of selling you see at school. Note the number of commercials in an hour of television. Keep a journal of corporate sales efforts at your local library, on sports fields, or elsewhere in your community. Display your observations on an informative poster. Discuss or write about how all this selling makes you feel. Is it okay with you? Why or not? How might things change for the better?

Imagine Greg and Maura have asked for your help with their school committee presentation. Use PowerPoint or another computer program to create a presentation based on the arguments made in the novel, adding suggestions and ideas of your own. Give your presentation to friends or classmates.

Assign roles of school committee members, administrators, and parents to your classmates or friends. Then improvise the conversation after Greg and Maura have left the school committee meeting. What points do members feel the kids made? Why do comic sales still pose a school problem? What about future sales proposals from other kids or schools? How do parents feel about this dilemma? How can a principal keep money-making from getting out of hand? Based on your improvisation, write an additional chapter to add to Lunch Money.

Imagine you are Greg or Maura near the end of the story. In the character of Greg, write a journal entry about your changing attitudes toward making money. Or, in the character of Maura, write a journal entry about your changing reasons for making comics.

Write a newspaper article about the success of Chunky Comics two years later. What has happened to Greg and Maura? How have their dreams changed? Upon what new adventures have they embarked?

Do you have a great idea for something to make and sell? Write a plan, including a sketch of your product, its name, and how you will sell it. What will your product cost to make, for how much will you sell it, and what profit do you hope to earn? What will you do with your earnings?

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular FRINDLE. He has been nominated for a multitude of state awards and has won the Christopher Award and an Edgar Award. His popular works include EXTRA CREDIT, LOST AND FOUND, NO TALKING, ROOM ONE, LUNCH MONEY, A WEEK IN THE WOODS, THE JACKET, THE SCHOOL STORY, THE JANITOR'S BOY, THE LANDRY NEWS, THE REPORT CARD AND THE LAST HOLIDAY CONCERT. Mr. Clements taught in the public schools near Chicago for seven years before moving East to begin a career in publishing and writing. He lives with his wife in central Massachusetts and has four grown children.  His website is andrewclements.com. 

Brian Selznick is the author and illustrator of the bestselling The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was awarded the Caldecott Medal and was a National Book Award finalist. He is also the illustrator of many books for children, including Frindle and Lunch Money by Andrew Clements, as well as the Doll People trilogy by Ann M. Martin and Laura Godwin, and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which was a Caldecott Honor Book. Mr. Selznick divides his time between Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

Customer Reviews

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Lunch Money 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 153 reviews.
laurasgrandpa More than 1 year ago
My granddaughter and loved "Lunch Money". The characters were dynamic and interesting while the situations were plausible and exciting. Clements is a brilliant author!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the best book that i have read in a long time and i reccomend this book to many kids
Guest More than 1 year ago
Andrew Clements out did his self again. It was a great book. I read the book in two days not because it was short because it was so good. You should buy this book for your kids. They will enjoy the book.
BooksisterinAZ More than 1 year ago
Lunch Money is a best selling book by Andrew Clements. The story is about a young boy named Greg, he loves to make money. Here are some of the ways he did, sold lemonade, cleaned flours, and much more. Then one day he met a girl across the street named Maura, every thing Greg did she did. Which wasn't ok for Greg. One day at school Greg started selling comic books to the students, so did Maura the next day. Somehow Greg and Maura came together and teamed up. Maura sketched while Greg inked. A day at school came and they weren't aloud to sell comic books anymore because their principle disliked it. That day on at school they had a talk with their principle about no more comic book selling. The next day came, Greg and Maura saw a flier that said " book club" and it was selling comic books!" So from then on Greg and Maura were fighting for their rights to sell comics. I personally think that everybody should read this book so they see people who really have a passion for what they believe in!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have never read this book but i have read most of this authors other work. They are pretty good books and from what i have read it would definately be a good read. Please respond so i know you got my message.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book is so predictable and boring there is nothing about lunch money in the book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book i hadto give 5 ratings becuse i loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My classmates love andrew clements they have been reading his books since 1st grade and were in 5th grade now. But the point is this is the best book according to all my classmates
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have print copy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book READ NOW!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is full of competition and great
isaac_IG More than 1 year ago
Yes, i would recommend this to a friend. i love money do you ill tell you somebody ho really likes money this kid called Greg Kenton.i would mostly recommend if my friend likes money which i know they do.The other book i like from this author is called called frindle.the part i liked the most part i liked was when the girl and Greg Kenton were fighting for the money and the girl punched Greg in the face and before that the girl tried stealing Greg way of making money which was selling magazine for $.50
American More than 1 year ago
My son had to read this book for school. Great book for 4th graders. He really enjoyed it and they did book reports on it in school. I heard him laugh often while reading to himself in his room.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lunch Money by Andrew Clemens has a lot of positives and just a few negatives. One positive is that it is book that all kids can relate to; because almost every kid wants to make money. Another positive about this book; it has illustrations. Lastly, another positive is that it is very easy to understand. One negative about this book is that the story line progresses slowly. Another negative is that it's a very competitive book. Lastly, another negative is that it has very long chapters. Lunch Money by Andrew Clemens varies in a lot of ways. The author of Lunch Money has a very unique writing style. To keep the reader interested, the author made the chapters get shorter as the book progressed. The story also has a lot of conversations in it. He also makes the book very realistic; mostly because it is about kids my age. Andrew Clemens has a very good writing style. I highly recommend Lunch Money by Andrew Clemens. One reason is that it is very easy to understand. Another reason it is a very descriptive book. Lastly, another reason is it is very realistic. There are a few similar novels to this one. One is Frindle by Andrew Clemens. Another is Room One by Andrew Clemens. Lastly another similar novel to lunch money is Things not Seen by Andrew Clemens. One novel I recommend is Crash by jerry spinelli. I recommend this novel because it an interesting book about 6th graders and bullying. Another novel I recommend is Lost and Found by Andrew Clemens. I recommend this novel because it is another book about 6th graders. Lastly I recommend the series of Diary of a Wimpy Kid because it is a very funny good series.
Pleasantdale More than 1 year ago
This is a really funny book. This girl and boy fight about money. The girl steals the boy's way of making money. That makes him really angry. The girl in the book even punches the boy in the nose because he made her so angry. Most people would like this book if they want to laugh. B.B.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Who says kids aren¿t rich? Greg Kenton, a talented, creative boy, who is the inventor of Chunky Comics doesn¿t think that. He knows that kids can be rich. The reason for that is because he¿s been making hundreds of dollars since he was in preschool. Then of course, there¿s Maura Shaw. The girl who lives across the street, who copies everything Greg does. She also likes to make money. Greg is good at sports, in school, but most of all at making money. Greg comes up with the idea of making Chunky Comics, and of course, Maura starts making comics too. They have a fight in Mr. Z¿s class and Greg ends up going to the nurse with a bloody nose. Mr. Zenotopoulous is Greg¿s math teacher, who hates to see blood, or hear the word blood. Soon, Maura and Greg are working together to make Chunky Comics. But Mrs. Davenport, the strict principal, will not accept comic books in school. So it¿s Mr. Z, Greg, and Maura fighting against Mrs. Davenport and the school board. Who will win this Battle of the Books? Will everybody work together and think of a plan? Or will the battle get worse and worse?
This book is a great book to read. My favorite part was when Greg and Maura learned to get along. Lunch Money reminds me of a book called Good Grief Third Grade. In this book, Roger is always annoying Marsha. Yet when Roger is gone, Marsha realizes how much she misses him. In the end, they both realize that they like the book Charlotte¿s Web. The lesson learned is ¿sometimes your worst enemy turns into your best friend.¿ This book can teach you how to get along with others.
Andrew Clements is the author of bestsellers that include The Landry News, Lunch Money, and Frindle. Andrew Clements lives with his wife in Westborough, Massachusetts. He is the father of four grown children. I highly recommend that you read this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
omg,lunch money is a very good book for young readers,its about a boy who finds out ways to earn money,he hides his money in odd places and his dad got him a bank acount so he could get even more money.lunch money is a really good book
nnicolic on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
Greg is a young brilliant student that sells comic books to make money. He uses math, economics, business sills to promote his trolls and comic book selling. When his arch enemy starts on the comic book bandwagon, but for the female audience, he begins to figure out a new plan. The two of them team up to sell together and they run into problems with their principle. They win in the end. Students can learn from this book what takes to be a cleaver minded. It is a great book to get students thinking about their future and how they too can earn money.
bsalomon on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
Greg Kenton is obsessed with money and likes to invest it, save it, and earn it. When Greg decides that he could make a lot of money by selling things at school, he maps out a plan and sells toys and comic books. Maura is his neighbor how likes to do the same things as Greg, which makes Greg really mad. When both Maura and Greg get caught selling comic books, the principal bands them from selling comic book or anything else in school. Greg and Maura then decide to start a comic book club that turns out to be successful. This is a great book for children to read because it¿s funny and can teach children how to deal with money.
lekenned on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
This book would be a fun way to incorporate math skills into reading. I think this would be really cute to pair with a buisness activity, like maybe having a class lemonade stand or bake sale.
HopeMiller123 on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
This book is about a boy that is very fascinated with money. He always saved, and found all ways to make money for himself. As he gets older he starts a business where he sells comic books for money at school. He gets in trouble for this and runs into problems with his arch enemy and the principal. At the end he resolves his issues and actually unites with his enemy to go up against his principal to sell his comics and other things in school. This book teaches teamwork, the power of math, and friendship.
LainaBourgeois on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
Greg is always scheming to make money, even when he was younger. His rival at school is Maura, who "steals his idea" for making a comic book to sell at school. They finally realize they could make more money as partners, but are shut down by the administration. The kids fight for their rights and end up making a bigger impact on the school than expected.
adamjohn on LibraryThing 17 hours ago
Greg Kenton loves money. He knows how to earn it, save it and spend it. He wants to make more money, so he starts selling stuff; at SCHOOL! He tries with some candy, then toys. But the best thing is comic books. He makes them alone, then he sells them. But Maura Shaw, "steels" his idea and makes his own little comic. Is it only a little mistake? Or is it a lot worse than a problem...