Managing Water Conflict: Asia, Africa and the Middle East

Managing Water Conflict: Asia, Africa and the Middle East

by Ashok Swain

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Overview

Managing Water Conflict: Asia, Africa and the Middle East by Ashok Swain

Countries are meeting increasing water demand by building reservoirs and by diverting water from one area to another. When the water belongs to an international river system, these measures lead to riparian conflicts. However, water scarcity not only brings conflict to these regions, but also plays its part in building cooperation.

In several international river basins in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, competing and disputing riparian countries are now moving towards a co-operative sharing arrangement. The signs of agreements on water sharing may be easy, but the real problem is how to keep these arrangements on track. Such agreements can positively contribute to peace and cooperation by addressing future needs, making sustainable decisions and being progressive in their management. Managing Water Conflict looks at these current stresses and likely future scenarios for this vitally important subject.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780415861786
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Publication date: 10/31/2013
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 248
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Ashok Swain is Associate Professor in the department of Peace and Conflict Research at Uppsala University, Sweden, and serves as director of the Uppsala University programme of International Studies and Co-Ordinator of the Southeast Asian Programme. His research area includes works on environmental conflicts and co-operation, global water issues and democratic development. He has published numerous articles and several monographs on this subject.

Table of Contents

1. Water Scarcity: A Threat to Security or an Incentive to Cooperate? 2. South Asia and its Large Rivers: The Indus, the Mahakali and with special emphasis on the Ganges 3. Rivers in the Middle East and North Africa: The Jordan, the Euphrates-Tigris and with special emphasis on the Nile 4. Southeast Asia and the Mekong River 5. Southern Africa and its Shared Rivers: The Orange, the Limpopo, the Okavango and with special emphasis on the Zamebezi 6. Sustaining Water Agreements and Maturing Cooperation

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