Matter (Culture Series #7)

Matter (Culture Series #7)

by Iain M. Banks

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316005371
Publisher: Orbit
Publication date: 02/10/2009
Series: Culture Series , #7
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 624
Sales rank: 295,772
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.70(d)

About the Author

Iain Banks came to controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984. Consider Phlebas, his first science fiction novel, was published under the name Iain M. Banks in 1987. He is now widely acclaimed as one of the most powerful, innovative and exciting writers of his generation.

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Matter 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Mainstay71 More than 1 year ago
I'm a fan of the author's previous work, but this book disappointed me. Banks is an excellent writer, and any given page of Matter is enjoyable to read, but its plot is flawed. Two of the three major plot lines meander aimlessly, with no narrative conflict. The third is meatier, but while it is definitely put to rest, the way in which this is done feels more like a betrayal of the reader's trust than a resolution. Finally, the book's climactic moments are only tangenitally related to all that came before. I'd like to believe that the book that was published was not the book that Mr. Banks planned to write, and that external pressures resulted in the wounded, seemingly truncated thing that is Matter. As it is, however, I can't recommend this book, even to fans of his work.
Klapauzius More than 1 year ago
This book reads great through the first 400 pages or so.. An intriguing plot with interesting characters is carefully built up, leading the reader to expect a grand and satisfying finale, where every thread of the story will be resolved. Instead the book ends in way that makes one think the author lost interest in bringing the story to an end. Antagonists and protagonists alike are suddenly and quite absurdly extinguished by something neither they nor the reader saw coming. On the last few pages a lame end is compressed and not even the epilogue can really help to resolve it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After several false starts I read this to the end only to feel like I had been pranked by the author. Don't waste your money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was my second Iain M Banks "Culture" novel. The first one I read was "Use of Weapons". Several early chapters were a "hard read". I had to push myself. The last half of the book flowed much better, and the last 100 pages were excellent, with a good ending. "Use of Weapons" was more captivating, beginning to end, for me. That one I'd give 5 stars plus
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this guy's stuff, but this one was a 500 page slog to get to the end where the last 100 pages are as exciting as any sci-fi techno thriller. I just wish that the whole book could have been as good, or at least about 300 pages shorter!
wfzimmerman on LibraryThing 30 days ago
State of the art stuff. A convincing meditation on what "matters" when all your material needs are met.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Banks somehow managed to mix the primitive life stories with the ultra advanced Involveds. Great story that comes crashing to the ultimate ends within two chapters!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not his best work, read "Surface Detail" and "Excession" for that, but it is very complicated, very funny and full of wondrous what-ifs. The books are sometimes work, but I love them; Absolutely my favorite author. To bad there will be no more "Culture" novels. Banks died in 2013.
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Damian666 More than 1 year ago
It took me most of the book to really get into it. The world of Banks' Culture is immense; though he tends to use huge numbers to describe gargatuan objects and the like, his prose never really makes you feel overwhelmed (in the good way), like other well written space opera can. I needed to take a crash course on the Culture Wiki to be fully drawn into what was happening. Then, just as I started to care, I experienced one of the most unsatisfactory endings ever. Bleh.
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