Men's Lives

Men's Lives

by Peter Matthiessen

Paperback(1st Vintage Books ed)

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Overview

An eloquent portrayal of a disappearing way of life of the Long Island fishermen whose voices—humorous, bitter and bewildered—are as clear as the threatened beauty of their once quiet shore.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780394755601
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/12/1988
Edition description: 1st Vintage Books ed
Pages: 356
Sales rank: 760,531
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Peter Matthiessen was born in New York City in 1927 and had already begun his writing career by the time he graduated from Yale University in 1950. The following year, he was a founder of The Paris Review. Besides At Play in the Fields of the Lord, which was nominated for the National Book Award, he published six other works of fiction, including Far Tortuga and Killing Mister Watson. Matthiessen's parallel career as a naturalist and explorer resulted in numerous widely acclaimed books of nonfiction, among them The Tree Where Man Was Born, which was nominated for the National Book Award, and The Snow Leopard, which won it. Matthiessen died in 2014.

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Men's Lives 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
an eloquently written book. the author truly captures the true heart of the matter. immensely readable.
bexaplex on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Men's Lives is a eulogy for a few generations of fishermen and a fishing community on the South Fork of Long Island. From the late 19th century to the 1960s motorless dories were launched from the beach, setting nets that were hauled in by horse teams and then winches on cars. Motors were added to the dories, but by the 1980s striped bass conservation measures, poor fishing and employment opportunities in other industries were driving off the newest generation of would-be fishermen.