Miss Wonderful (Carsington Family Series #1)

Miss Wonderful (Carsington Family Series #1)

by Loretta Chase

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback)

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Overview

Beloved author Loretta Chase offers her long-awaited new novel-the tale of a bluestocking and a  reformed rake who clash over a matter of business, and soon find themselves facing an entirely different, and delicious, sort of tension.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425194836
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/02/2004
Series: Carsington Family Series , #1
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 536,634
Product dimensions: 4.23(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.93(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Loretta Chase holds a B.A. from Clark University, where she majored in English and minored unofficially in visual art. Her past lives include part-time teaching at Clark and a Dickensian six-month experience as a meter maid. In the course of moonlighting as a corporate video scriptwriter, she fell under the spell of a producer who lured her into writing novels . . . and marrying him. The union has resulted in more than a dozen books and a number of awards, including the Romance Writers of America’s RITA Award.  You can talk to Loretta via her email address Author@LorettaChase.com, or visit her website at www.LorettaChase.com.

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Miss Wonderful 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
1VAReader More than 1 year ago
The Carsington brothers are all powerful exciting men who exhibit traits of their father.  Alastair is particularly interesting because he does not see himself as powerful or useful.  The fact that he is a war hero with a limp does not weaken his character , but makes him even more sexy and loveable.  I enjoy this book very much.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 1817 Earl Edward Carsington is tired of paying the bills for his third of five sons and the oldest unmarried one. He demands that Alistair in his late twenties either finds a wealthy wife or earns income through business. Rather than wed, the melancholy war ¿hero¿ joins his friend Lord Gordmor in building a canal in Derbyshire..................................... Some of the local landowners oppose the project so Alistair heads north to persuade them to support the canal endeavor. The opposition leader is spinster Mirabel Oldridge who is a couple of years older than Alistair. As she deftly sabotages his support through her silver tongue, they fall in love. However, he believes the canal is a boom while she believes it is a bust leaving a gap wider than his proposal to keep them apart................................. Fans will enjoy this wonderful Regency romance that takes the contemporary issue of environment vs. development back to its roots in early nineteenth century England. The story line is crisp as Mirabel and Alistair debate the merits and demerits of the impact of a canal on the locality even as both fall in love. The secondary cast adds depth to the debate so that the audience receives a terrific historical tale with modern day implications......................... Harriet Klausner
wolffe on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I found this novel well written, but featuring an unfortunate hero. Although he's described as a "dandy" in the book I couldn't help associating another less flattering description: flop. I found Mirabel's stubbornness to preserve her land without a good reason and it became rather annoying. I also didn't particularly care for her being older than her hero. (Petty and picky, I know.)
theshadowknows on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed Miss Wonderful. The characters are engaging and original. The dialogue sparkles. The prose is fluid and pure fun to read ¿ with a bit of an Austen feel to it for me. Alistair Carsington, the younger son of an earl, is not your typical regency rake. He manages to pull off the incongruous mix of being both a dandy and scarred war hero. He¿s very uncomfortable with his fame as a hero and the wounds he earned at Waterloo. The former he thinks is undeserved and the latter is a noticeable limp of which he is ashamed. The thing I liked best about Alistair was how self-effacing he was. He doesn't use his war wounds as an opportunity to brood and rage all over the place. He's charming, chivalrous, and flawed. Even better, he isn¿t famous for millions of affairs as part of a marriage hating complex. (Love doesn¿t exist, my parents didn¿t marry for love, all women are conniving mercenaries, bla bla bla.) He¿s more of a head ache for his parents, who have had to bail him out of numerous disasters, financial and amorous. I loved the list of Episodes of Stupidity with which his father confronts him, prior to delivering the ultimatum that Alistair must find a way to cease draining his parents financially or his younger brothers will suffer for it. Alistair¿s solution is to join his best friend Lord Gordmor in a business venture, the building of a canal in Derbyshire. To this end, Alistair travels to Derbyshire to plead their case with the largest landowner in the area, Mr. Oldridge. Unfortunately, since the death of his wife, Mr. Oldridge has cared for nothing but botanical pursuits, so Alistair has to deal with his daughter, Mirabel, who has run the estate for the past ten years or so. And she is vehemently opposed to Alistair and Gordmor¿s project. From the start it¿s clear that Mirabel is an intelligent, capable woman. All the work she does, all the responsibilities she shoulders are very evident in the book, so she¿s not one of those ¿bluestocking¿ heroines who make vague references to doing math-type things, but never really do anything. She¿s genuine and practical, has given up a lot to run the estate, but she doesn¿t whine about it. She made her choice years ago to commit herself to this certain path, and though she¿s not above missing the fun of her youth, she doesn¿t turn her actions into a huge, dramatic sacrifice. Despite (or perhaps because of) being antagonists with regards to the canal, she and Alistair have great chemistry as they disagree, resist each other, and eventually work towards a solution to the obstacles that stand between them. Alistair¿s reactions to Mirabel¿s sartorial offenses are particularly funny and endearing.Other reviews of Miss Wonderful are kind of mixed and I can understand how the sedate pacing of the book and its premise might be considered drawbacks. The circumstances under which the hero and heroine meet don¿t particularly scream "romantic." Alistair is in Derbyshire for business, and that business is a big part of the book. It¿s the plot, what brings the characters together, what everyone talks about a lot of the time. The building of the canal is tied up with the industrial revolution transforming the landscape of rural England at the time, so Miss Wonderful is not your typical balls and tea parties romance. Some might find it tedious, but I thought the author integrated these issues very well with the development of Alistair and Mirabel¿s relationship. Alistair is invested in the canal venture because it¿s his first chance to stand on his own and make something of himself, let alone save his brothers from ruin. Mirabel is emotionally tied to the land and has made great sacrifices for it. Loretta Chase writes so well that I was never bored with the canal business. My only objection was the book¿s descent into stereotype with the awkward introduction of a devious villain near the end, a kidnapping, the doddering old father, and the heroine¿s initi
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book started out okay but it got lost in details and interrupted over and over again until I skipped over most of the middle and barely read the last chapter.
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This was disappointing! I loved it for one reason... It helped me fall asleep.
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