Moon Flower

Moon Flower

by Shirl Henke

NOOK Book(eBook)

$2.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
LendMe® See Details
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Moon Flower by Shirl Henke

Little more than a spoiled boy, Raphael Flamenco leaves New Orleans for the new Republic of Texas to drag his willful Yankee wife back to civilization. She is his “property” and she will damned well get used to her new role as a proper Creole wife. If Texas doesn’t kill a man first, it has a way of making him grow up. Raphael quickly learns that there are no artificial codes of honor in this brutal land. When men fight, they fight like animals to survive. He learns that his best friend can be a half-breed Cherokee. And this Creole son of slave owners finds out what it means to be a slave himself. The Comanche are thorough teachers. But Raphael Flamenco survives to become the tough, hardened Texian, Rafe Fleming, who never abandons his search for the woman he cannot stop loving.

Boston abolitionist Deborah Manchester falls so deeply in love with her handsome Creole husband that she tries to adjust to his world, a society steeped in moral hypocrisy and casual cruelty. But when she discovers that she carries her husband’s child, she vows that her babe will not be tainted by the same social “poison” that infects her husband. He will not change, so she must. “Gone-to-Texas” as a runaway wife posing as a widow, she learns on the raw frontier that she possesses strengths she never imagined. Yet in her lonely bed at night, she still dreams of Rafael's heated touch.

When, by chance, they come face to face in San Antonio, both are stunned by how Texas has changed them. He finds his silver-haired “Moon Flower” is now a strong Texas woman of property whose trust he must win in order to reclaim her love. In spite of the scars on his face and the look of a dangerous pistolero, Rafe Fleming is still the only man she will ever love. Now, just what does an independent “widow lady” do when her “dead” husband resurrects himself from the grave?

Product Details

BN ID: 2940015255591
Publisher: Shirl Henke
Publication date: 08/25/2012
Series: Texas Trilogy , #2
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 443,691
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

SHIRL HENKE lives in St. Louis, where she enjoys gardening in her yard and greenhouse, cooking holiday dinners for her family and listening to jazz. In addition to helping brainstorm and research her books, her husband Jim is “lion tamer” for their two wild young tomcats, Pewter and Sooty, geniuses at pillage and destruction.
Shirl has been a RITA finalist twice, and has won three Career Achievement Awards, an Industry Award and three Reviewer’s Choice Awards from Romantic Times.
“I wrote my first twenty-two novels in longhand with a ballpoint pen—it’s hard to get good quills these days,” she says. Dragged into the twenty-first century by her son Matt, a telecommunication specialist, Shirl now uses two of those “devil machines.” Another troglodyte bites the dust. Please visit her at www.shirlhenke.com.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Moon Flower 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
DangerGirl47 More than 1 year ago
This is a big, big book. However, let me warn you right off, if your tastes run to "sweet" romances, this is no book for you. It's a great story filled with passion and adventure, but definitely not sappy. But then again, neither was the historical period in which it's set. Deborah and Rafe are both bluebloods. She was raised in Boston, he in New Orleans. The geographical distance between the two cities matches the differences in lifestyles. The couple has several problems: neither can accept the values the other was raised with, both have wicked tempers, and both share a "tear-your-clothes off passion" for each other. Love scenes are steamy. But the only neutral "psychological" and moral middle ground they have is the Texas frontier. No "sweet" there. Though she can't get Rafe out of her head, Deborah learns to be an independent widow lady. And though Rafe is filled with as much longing as she, he has a hard time growing up and keeping alive - until he finds her again as a better man and better husband. I love New Orleans, so I really enjoyed the historical picture of how the Creole aristocracy lived. And one segment when Rafe was a Comanche slave was fascinating. No wonder everybody thought the Comanche were the baddest horse Indians around. They were. Still, Shirl Henke controls her story and brings it all to a happy conclusion. If you like hefty books, you'll love this one.
Anon0 More than 1 year ago
If you are long-time romance reader, like me, this is the sort of book that will remind you of the great epics that Rosemary Rogers and Jude Deveraux used to write when they were at their peaks. The story begins in Boston (but only briefly) before moving to Creole New Orleans and later to the sweeping plains of the new Republic of Texas. Raphael (Rafe) and Deborah share a tempestuous love. They are two strong and stubborn people shaped by two completely opposing cultures. And their fiery relationship reflects that fact. When Deborah flees to Texas to escape her arrogant husband and the Creole culture she has learned to despise, Raphael follows. He tells himself that he only wants to humble a willful wife. The truth is he can't get her out his mind or heart. When the two meet again, Texas has matured and tempered them both, but not dimmed the passion they share. In this story all the Henke trademarks (at her best) are here--passionate love scenes, a vividly graphic portrayal of such historical backgrounds as sophisticated New Orleans and crude and violent Texas frontier, and a cast of colorful character such as Obedience Jones (who was my favorite). You'll want to read this book several times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago