Murder on Gramercy Park (Gaslight Mystery Series #3)

Murder on Gramercy Park (Gaslight Mystery Series #3)

by Victoria Thompson

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)

$7.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Want it by Monday, November 26 Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425178867
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/28/2001
Series: Gaslight Mystery Series , #3
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 64,118
Product dimensions: 4.20(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Victoria Thompson is the Edgar(r) Award-nominated author of the Gaslight mystery series and 20 additional historical novels. She lives in Pennsylvania with her family.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“Victoria Thompson shines…Anne Perry and Caleb Carr fans rejoice!” —Tamar Myers, author of The Hand that Rocks the Ladle

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Murder on Gramercy Park (Gaslight Series #3) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mystery at the turn of the century in New York, presents interesting insights into New York at that time. A glimpse into the social expectations of different social classes during the era is almost as interesting as the mystery itself. It make me want to read the entire series of Gaslight Mysteries.
Fraktal More than 1 year ago
Midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy return in this third installment of the Gaslight Mystery series. This series is charming and enjoyable to read. The novels are set in the late 1890s, during a time when the NYPD was incredibly corrupt, and Teddy Roosevelt was trying to turn things around (though T.R. only rates the occasional mention and does not appear in the novels). In this installment, Sarah and Malloy have slowly become friends, and it's clear there is a slow attraction starting to form between them. However, Thompson is careful to subordinate this ongoing thread to the main story, which is about the murder of a famous, newly wealthy "faith healer" named Edmund Blackwell. There are plenty of suspects and like any good mystery, the first few guesses one has will probably be wrong. I like these novels because, like most Agatha Christie novels, Thompson "plays fair" with the reader. She does not hold back facts or clues and spring them on you like a Deus Ex Machina. All the clues are there if you are reading carefully, and you can figure it out (and I did -- sort of... I guessed the murderer about 2/3 of the way through the book, though I was wrong about some details). To me, a good mystery is one where it is a challenge for me, as the reader, to guess the solution, but not impossible, and that's exactly what Murder on Gramercy Park is like. On top of that, I like reading about other times and places, and Ms. Thompson does an outstanding job of bringing the 1890s to life. You can technically read this book without having read the first two in the series, but I wouldn't. I highly recommend starting with the first book, since it explains the complicated and interesting relationship between Sarah Brandt and Malloy. Overall, if you are a mystery fan and particularly if you like Agatha Christie's style of novels, I can recommend Murder on Gramercy Park.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While I had issues with predictability in the first novel, I found myself jumping to read the second, which I liked much better. This third installment is very good, although I found 5 spelling and/or grammar errors in the first 14 pages - you need to get a better editor. It is very distracting.
Guest More than 1 year ago
New York Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy summons Sarah Brandt, a midwife, to the elegant home of famed magnetic healer Edmund Blackwell. Mrs. Blackwell has gone into labor after finding her husband dead in their home. Frank determines that Mr. Blackwell was murdered although it appears the killer tried to make it look like suicide. As he begins investigating, Sarah, who has helped him with previous investigations, has to keep returning to the Blackwell's since their new son has become ill. In her many trips to their home, she begins to find out some important information regarding his death. Frank does not want her helping with the investigation, but realizes his wishes will not be heeded. Frank and Sarah find that things were not as happy in the Blackwell household as first thought. Then there are all Mr. Blackwell's female clients who seem overly upset over his death. And there is a scandal that was about to be made known in Blackwell's past. Is his assistant too eager to take over? Who killed him and why? Could it have been regarding one of these issues or is there another issue they don't know about yet. Normally I don't like mysteries set back in time, but this is one of the few series that are the exception. This series is so well written. The characters are so real and the time-period laid out so well. I often find myself amazed that the police back then were so brutal and so many people were living well below poverty. The darkness of New York really adds to this series. Her writing of the time and the way she lays out the story without giving the killer away is terrific. You never know until the killer is revealed who did it. This cozy mystery is great. I highly recommend this book as well as the whole series.
Sue43 More than 1 year ago
I loved this book!! It's a great era in our country to read about.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Always a good choice for bedtime reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you haven't read Victoria Thompson's gaslight series, you are truly missing out. I am currently reading them in order, and one is better than the next. I highly recommend the entire series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A nice cozy mystery.
Anntstobbs on LibraryThing 2 days ago
The victim is a doctor who has very unorthodox methods of treating his patients. Sarah Brandt is called to the bedside of the victim's wife who is about to deliver her baby. Detective Malloy has made himself a promise to stay out of Sarah's life but finds himself once again working alongside her to solve the mystery.
Kathy89 on LibraryThing 2 days ago
I'm really enjoying this series! Wealthy healer married into society is found shot in the head at his desk. Believed to be a suicide. His wife discovers the body and goes into labor. Of course Detective Malloy sends for midwife Sarah Brandt. Lots of twists and turns -- wife has an addiction problem, baby is born addicted, healer is a quack, bigamist, son shows up to blackmail him, wife's former suitor arrives and a snobby butler too. Meanwhile the relationship of Frank and Sarah is progressing slowly. She goes with him to see the doctor who can operate on Brian's foot and sits with during the operation. My only complaint with this series is that Sarah is completely oblivious to any danger that surrounds her.
delphimo on LibraryThing 2 days ago
I very much enjoy this series set in New York in the 1890's. In this installment, Sarah Brandt must help Mallory discover who killed a notable healer. At first, the police think that the "doctor" has committed suicide, but Mallory notices too many clues. The chief suspect is a son of Dr Blackwell's from his first marriage, until this lad is poisoned. Sarah takes the reader behind the scenes and into the secrets on the wealthy that live sordid lives. As usual, Thompson presents the innovations in medicine with the talk of x-rays. The noisy neighbor, Mrs. Ellsworth, provides a look into the world of superstition and seems to provide comic relief throughout the story.
BrianEWilliams on LibraryThing 2 days ago
This is another solid story in a good mystery series, There's lots of local colour about NYC at the turn of the century (19th to 20th), Aside from the mystery, there's a good story in the life and times of Sarah - her relationships with Malloy (and his son) and her neighbour. I look forward to future developments with her reconciliation with her mother and father.
cyderry on LibraryThing 2 days ago
This is the third installment of the Gaslight Mysteries with Sarah Brandt, midwife, and Frank Malloy, Detective Sergeant of the NYC police as the central characters. In this book, Malloy is called to the scene of the apparent suicide of Edmund Blackwell, hypnotic healer, after his pregnant wife returns to their home after an afternoon out to find him dead. Startled into labor, Malloy sends for Sarah to help with the delivery. While labor proceeds upstairs, Malloy determines that the suicide is really murder downstairs.As usual Sarah gets involved in the investigation and helps Malloy in different ways resolve the twists and turns that lead to the unexpected solution.It's great to see the interaction between the two main characters especially when they try to remain consistent with the time periods social restrictions. Their relationship is moving forward, or so it seems but do they know?
dibbylodd 9 months ago
This is a fascinating series that clearly presents the reality of its time and place. We have the two main characters, midwife Sarah and Detective Malloy, plus the entertaining neighbor to Sarah who is always conveniently sweeping her front steps, thus missing out on nothing of importance. Their dance around each other is progressing. He lost his wife in childbirth due, he feels, to an incompetent midwife. There is a lot going on and it wraps up quite nicely.
dibbylodd 9 months ago
This is a fascinating series that clearly presents the reality of its time and place. We have the two main characters, midwife Sarah and Detective Malloy, plus the entertaining neighbor to Sarah who is always conveniently sweeping her front steps, thus missing out on nothing of importance. Their dance around each other is progressing. He lost his wife in childbirth due, he feels, to an incompetent midwife. There is a lot going on and it wraps up quite nicely.
Carstairs38 More than 1 year ago
The Suicide That Wasn’t There are really only so many set ups to a murder mystery, and a common one is a murder made to look like a suicide. That’s what starts Murder on Gramercy Square, the third Gaslight Mystery from Victoria Thompson. But, as with other books I’ve read with this set up, the mystery branches off into some unexpected directions from the familiar beginning. New York Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy isn’t happy about being assigned to a suicide case. He’s even less happy when he arrives to learn the victim’s wife has gone into labor. Against his better judgment, he calls on midwife Sarah Brandt to come and attend to the wife while he goes to view the scene. The victim is Dr. Edmund Blackwell, a magnetic healer who has cured many people who were supposed to be beyond medical help. In fact, one of his first clients was his now wife, Letitia. Frank has only looked at the scene for a couple of minutes when he realizes that it was a murder. He must reluctantly involve Sarah again since she is getting information as a result of being Letitia’s midwife. Why would anyone want to kill a doctor who seems to be doing so many people so much good? Some historical novels set their action around famous historical events. That isn’t the case here, but the historical setting infuses every page. We get a real sense of how people lived in New York in the 1890’s, and how various people were expected to relate to each other. It is very interesting to view how our society has changed for the better, and the worse. This book really does transport you to another time and place. Of course, the main reason I picked up this book was for the mystery, and I wasn’t disappointed at all. I thought I had it all figured out early on, but I turned out to have missed a big piece of the puzzle. And even if I’d been correct, I still would have enjoyed every page since there were threads I wanted to see resolved. The book spends almost equal time between Frank and Sarah, allowing us to get the clues with these two main characters. It also always us to really get to know them. Their relationship is a lot of fun and adds some light touches to the book. The other returning characters are very minor, but they are also fun. That gives the cast of suspects plenty of time to be developed, and we get some great depth to them, which makes some of the events of the story pack a real punch. Quite obviously, I am woefully behind on this series, and I wished I’d started it much sooner. Murder on Gramercy Park makes it easy to see why the Gaslight series has been so popular for so long. I’m looking forward to catching up on the rest of this series soon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found Sarah's job quite unbelievable for a supposedly gently bred girl of that time; it could necer have happened. That and her offensive nosiness and insolence really put me off the story, which was otherwise well written. I don't enjoy reading about characters I didlike, however, so won't read more in this series. I absolutely hate it when writers take a time period where wtomen have few choices about profession and deportment and then plop into it a female protagonist withentirely modern sensibilities and decorum. Hey, if you want your heroine to be feisty and fearless, fine, bit put them in a setting more plausible than Victorian or Edwardian times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago