Neither Mountain Nor River: Fathers, Sons, and an Unsettled Faith

Neither Mountain Nor River: Fathers, Sons, and an Unsettled Faith

by Mike Freeman
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Overview

Neither Mountain Nor River: Fathers, Sons, and an Unsettled Faith by Mike Freeman

Having spent forty years harried by ageless questions of mortality and creation, Mike Freeman suddenly found himself a stay-at-home father in New York City after living for the last decade in Alaska. Unsure of himself as a parent, he reflects upon both his own upbringing and adulthood. While unraveling a lifetime fishing, birding, hunting, and trapping with his father, he realizes how fortifying the outdoors are to all relationships, secular and otherwise. Neither Mountain nor River is a testament to this understanding, and how an acceptance of uncertainty can equally strengthen marital and parental bonds, as well as that to God.

Written with depth and beauty, Freeman takes us both outside, into the wild, and inside, into the soul. As he struggles with passing on what he's learned to his own children, we get a unique glimpse into a man who lives purely for the wonders the world brings.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780984792788
Publisher: Riddle Brook Publishing
Publication date: 09/30/2014
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 890,959
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.55(d)

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Neither Mountain Nor River: Fathers, Sons, and an Unsettled Faith 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
KaneH More than 1 year ago
This is a poetic, lush book, full of love for the outdoors, and packed with insights from a man who is evaluating his relationship with his father as he himself learns about fatherhood. There is much to like and much to learn in this musing about life and what it all means. Those who have not felt the call of the wild should read it for more understanding, and those who have will nod with approval of how Freeman paints the time spent hunting, trapping, and truly being alive in the outdoors as something sacred and almost mystical. From the hunting of a grouse to the calls of birds, he deftly gives us the feel of the morning dew and the effect upon the soul of one who communes with nature to the fullest. Freeman explores the bonds between people, and their relationship to nature. There are excellent echoes of other literary writers of nature: Thoreau, Norman Maclean, Howard Frank Mosher. He seems like a philosopher-king of the mountains, trying to find a meaningful way in a world that few experience at this level.