One Hundred Names for Love: A Memoir

One Hundred Names for Love: A Memoir

by Diane Ackerman

Paperback

$15.34 $16.95 Save 9% Current price is $15.34, Original price is $16.95. You Save 9%. View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Thursday, June 27

Overview

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize

Finalist for the National Book Circle Critics Award


"A testament to the power of creativity in language, life—and love." —Heller McAlpin, Washington Post


No other writer can blend the science of the brain with the love of language like Diane Ackerman. In this extraordinary memoir, she opens a window into the experience of wordlessness—the language paralysis called aphasia. In narrating the recovery of her husband, Paul West, from a stroke that reduced his vast vocabulary to a single syllable, she evokes the joy and mystery of the brain’s ability to find and connect words. Deeply rewarding to readers of all kinds, Ackerman has given us a literary love story, accessible insight into the science and medicine of brain injury, and invaluable spiritual sustenance in the face of life’s myriad physical sufferings.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393341744
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 04/02/2012
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 461,015
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the best-selling The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. She lives in Ithaca, New York.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

One Hundred Names for Love 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
ReadingRoom More than 1 year ago
Besides being a book about helping stroke victims, it was a touching love story of how a wife, who new her husband well, designed a language therapy that was based on his own personality and helped him recover from a seemingly hopeless situation after suffering a stroke. You get an intimate look into their lives and the journey of recovery. The book was heartwarming and a delight to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading and identfying with the authors experience. Her ability to put in words this experience was unique and identifiable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was incredibly brave to have written such a painfully honest remembrance of a hard time and a dedication to love. Few people today can try through good and bad to love the one they're with like the author did. Read this book!
PierresFamily More than 1 year ago
In "One Hundred Names for Love," Diane Ackerman managed to craft both a medical memoir, as well as a love story. She weaves the moving story of how her life and her husband's changed, as a result of his serious stroke, and how they responded together. After showing us what their life and relationship were like "before," she allows us to walk through the stages of the "after," as they walk down new paths, and create new but still loving relationship dynamics. Ackerman shares enough medical info to help us understand the effects of the stroke, and yet she doesn't get so bogged down that we lose interest. I don't want to say more; I don't want to give away any spoilers. But this is a great book, and I highly recommend it.
Birdie17 More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for a specific reason: my husband had suffered a stroke 3 months earlier and he, like Ackerman's husband, was aphasic- unable to produce words. Both Ackerman and her husband are authors and words were not only the tools of their work,but also the basis of games they would play. The review indicated that the author had helped her husband regain his voice and I bought the book mainly to see what it was she did. It became clear that this couple was unique in their love of language, immersing themselves in puzzles, arcane word games- many of the words I had never heard- and word play before his stroke. For this reason, it was difficult to compare our lives to theirs. In addition, Ackerman was able, for better or worse, to be with her husband all the time,and had, as well,the benefit of a unique, dedicated assistant to help.It wasn't the "how to" guide I was hoping for. However, it is a moving memoir written by a wife who lived through this experience, and in this we shared similar paths. She spoke of the sorrow she felt in coming to terms with knowing life would never be the same and her husband would never be the same. I understood her grief and have felt it myself. I recommend this book especially to other spouses who have had to face the enormity of change that stroke forces upon your loved one and your relationship. In the end, there is always hope. Improvement is painfully slow, but it does come, and we learn to reshape our lives and move on together.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The subject matter was interesting. The unconditional love shown in the book is to be admired. I did find it too "wordy" for me. I know the two main characters were "wordsmiths", but I got annoyed with that aspect of the book. It was as though the author was "showing off" their knowledge of words. 
lynndp on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is the story of four years in the life of a couple after the husband suffers serious aphasia caused by a stroke. The sense of loss is heightened by the fact that both husband and wife are successful writers for whom word play is like eating or breathing. The tittle "One Hundred Names for Love" refers to the couples pre-stroke practice of devising novel pet names for each other. The author kept a journal chronicling her husband's frustrations with standard therapy and the non-stop "conversation therapy" that succeeded in guiding him back to his world of words.
lisaflip on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a decent book. The author's husband suffers a stroke and is affected by apashia, a language disorder which ranges from having difficulty remembering words to being completely unable to speak, read or write. This is especially problematic for this couple as they are both authors and stimulated by words, word games and a rich vocabulary. I didn't relate much to their situation but the book was very well written and their story compelling.
nyiper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
What a wonderful book in these times of so many growing older in the midst of "you never know what's going to happen next!" That's life. But Ackerman, and of course her husband, Paul, are a pair to behold, admire, and absorb---for their relationship and their abilities to persevere through so much. One asks, "could I do ANY of that?" One only hopes. Ackerman provides a personal wealth of knowledge to anyone who reads this.
dianaoeh on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Did he get better or not? That is what keeps you reading this book. This couple's devotion to each other and the intense and literate caregiving by Diane Ackerman are vital in helping author and husband Paul West regain his words after a serious stroke decimates the language area of his brain. Diane had previously researched and written a book about the brain, giving her an advantage in understanding her husband's injuries.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago