Onion Street (Moe Prager Series #8)

Onion Street (Moe Prager Series #8)

by Reed Farrel Coleman

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781440539466
Publisher: Gallery Books
Publication date: 05/18/2013
Series: Moe Prager Series , #8
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 653,402
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Reed Farrel Coleman is a New York Times bestselling author that has been called a "hard-boiled poet" by NPR's Maureen Corrigan and the "noir poet laureate" in The Huffington Post. He has published more than twenty-five previous novels, including novels in Robert Parker’s Jesse Stone series, the critically acclaimed Moe Prager series, and the Gus Murphy series. A three-time winner of the Shamus Award, he has also won the Anthony, Macavity, Barry, and Audie Awards. He lives with his family on Long Island.

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Onion Street 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
tedfeit0 More than 1 year ago
After seven novels in the Moe Prager mystery series, a retrospective is in order, especially after Moe has undergone surgery and chemotherapy for stomach cancer. The occasion follows the funeral of a boyhood (and best) friend, after which his daughter, visiting from Vermont, asks him why he became a cop, and what follows is a story by itself. Moe looks back to events in 1968 when he and his friends were attending Brooklyn College. The Vietnam War was raging, radicalism was in the air, and Moe was at loose ends. One night his girlfriend is found in a coma on the street, apparently having been viciously beaten, and suddenly Moe has a mission: to find the man who beat her up, taking him on a journey that later led him to become a policeman and PI. It is a hard-boiled tale involving all the worst elements of the period, bomb-throwing radicals, dope pushers, rotten cops and the like. It also is a deep moral story involving right and wrong. The humor of past Moe Prager novels is missing from “Onion Street,” but that is completely understandable: it is not a light-hearted subject with deaths strewn along the way. And some of Moe’s various actions can be questioned, while his intentions are always honorable. All in all, it is a very human saga, and we get to know Moe a lot better in a serious way. Recommended.
RobertDowns More than 1 year ago
I feel like I got on the wrong bus, got off at the wrong stop, sat in the wrong Sunday school class, and then raised my hand with the wrong answer to a gimme question. If this were a fishing expedition, I somehow ended up on the wrong pier, in the wrong state, with the wrong lure, and I’d even forgotten my damn hat (the fedora that I keep handy for emergency purposes). I’d really prefer not piss off a slew of Reed Farrel Coleman fans and have them banging on my doorstep at all hours of the day or night, but I also can’t inflate my rating for a book that I didn’t enjoy. So, if you insist on paying me a visit, you’re welcome to visit me at my winter home in North Pole, Alaska. Mr. Coleman sure has his literary credentials in order. And he has more starred reviews than Britney Spears has pairs of underwear. But reading this book reminded me of a one-man missile operator. The clichés seemed to attack me every few pages; the dialogue seemed a bit trite and stilted; the pages moved at a glacier’s pace; and I found myself plugging toothpicks in my eyes to continue reading. As I waited for someone to push the giant red button, I ended up off-roading more than I stayed on the asphalt. I did, however, enjoy the premise: an amateur sleuth working on his college education, investigating the attempted demise of his love interest. And the voice did make me want to break out my fedora on occasion, but I often, and just as quickly, wanted to shove it back in the closet and slam the door. Most people enjoy the Moe Prager novels, and you might as well, but I just wasn’t one of them. I received this book for free through NetGalley. Robert Downs Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator
MarjorieofConnecticut More than 1 year ago
I've read all of the first seven Moe Prager books by Reed Farrel Colemand and I've enjoyed each and every episode in the life of the former Brooklyn cop turned some-time private investigator. Now, author Coleman goes back to Moe's beginnings with a prequel that takes place in Brooklyn in 1967 and shares the story of just what might have lead Moe in the path he takes (or stumbles through) in life. I never like to give away anything spoilerish in reviews, but this book is a wonderful read, a real can't-put-it-down page turner with dark humor and great characters. Whether you've read the rest of the series or if you decide to start here with the series prequel (and then you'll be sure to go back and read the rest of the series), I think you'll have a very good time getting to know Moe Prager and the writing of Reed Farrel Coleman. Enjoy!