Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions: Second Edition

Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions: Second Edition

by Gloria Steinem

Paperback(Second Edition)

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Overview

Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions: Second Edition by Gloria Steinem

Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions—a phenomenal success that sold nearly half a million copies since its original publication in 1983—is Gloria Steinem's most diverse and timeless collection of essays. Both male and female readers have acclaimed it as a witty, warm, and life-changing view of the world—"as if women mattered." Steinem's truly personal writing is here, from the humorous exposé "I Was a Playboy Bunny" to the moving tribute to her mother "Ruth's Song (Because She Could Not Sing It)" to prescient essays on female genital mutilation and the difference between erotica and pornography. The satirical and hilarious "If Men Could Menstruate" alone is worth the price of admission.

This second edition features a new preface by the author and added notes on classic essays.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780805042023
Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 10/15/1995
Edition description: Second Edition
Pages: 432
Sales rank: 456,893
Product dimensions: 5.54(w) x 8.23(h) x 1.16(d)
Lexile: 1280L (what's this?)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Gloria Steinem is the author of several best-selling books, including Revolution from Within and Moving Beyond Words. She was a founding editor of and political commentator for New York Magazine and a founding editor of Ms., which she continues to write for today.

Table of Contents

LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE

Life Between the Lines

I Was a Playboy Bunny

Campaigning

Sisterhood

College Reunion

Ruth's Song (Because She Could Not Sing It)

OTHER BASIC DISCOVERIES

Words and Change

In Praise of Women's Bodies

The Importance of Work

The Time Factor

The Politics of Food

Networking

Transsexualism

Why Young Women Are More Conservative

Erotica vs. Pornography

FIVE WOMEN

Marilyn Monroe: The Woman Who Died Too Soon

Patricia Nixon Flying

The Real Linda Lovelace

Jackie Reconsidered

Alice Walker: Do You Know This Woman? She Knows You

TRANSFORMING POLITICS

Houston and History

The International Crime of Genital Mutilation

Rx Fantasies: For Temporary Relief of Pain Due to Injustice

If Hitler Were Alive, Whose Side Would He Be On?

Night Thoughts of a Media Watcher

If Men Could Menstruate

Far from the Opposite Shore

Index

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Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
The_Book_Wheel_Blog More than 1 year ago
About two months ago, during a class simulation, I was in the hallway speaking with several male classmates. Despite that fact that I had done my research and was an active participant,  90% of the men I was with completely ignored me, despite my overt attempts to join the conversation. It was so bad, in fact, that all but one of them walked away while I was still talking. Infuriated, I clapped my hands loudly and demanded that they listen to me. Had I not just been treated in such a way by a group of faculty members a few weeks before, I may have let it slide for the sake of civility, but I was tired of men acting as if they were placating me by allowing me to speak. They may as well have patted me on the head and told me to be a good little girl and play nice. I’ve always been very outspoken and assertive, so I’m not entirely sure how I made it to 30 without reading Gloria Steinem, but here I am, reading her for the first time. To be honest, I don’t know that I would have fully appreciated her or her work ten years ago, so maybe it’s for the best that I read her now! I’ve always thought of Ms. Steinem as an amazing, confident, trailblazing woman. I had no idea that she had a massive fear of public speaking, overanalyzed what she had said for days on end, and was constantly seeking approval. As someone who can identify with and is overcoming these same traits, it her ability to succeed and make such a long-lasting and positive change fills me with hope.Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions is a book of essays, most of which were written decades ago, and include relevant updates to keep the reader up to date on what the current state of affairs are. As Ms. Steinem points out in her introduction, some of these updates are depressing in that not much progress has been made. The essays range from how the transexual movement has affected gender roles, her time as a a Playboy Bunny, an essay about her mother and what would happen if men menstruated. While all of the essays covered very serious topics, they were made more interesting with a type of humor that was not haha funny, but instead amusing in a this-is-real-life way. It made the book much more approachable and less preachy. In fact, the book didn’t seem preachy or “feministy” at all and yet I finished the book wanting to jump up and shout about how great it is to be a woman.One of the things that Ms. Steinem emphasized in the book is that women tend to become more liberal as they get older, and thus are more likely to become “activists” later on in life. This is not because young women are failing to understand the importance of gender equality, but rather that until they are beginning (or even halfway through) their careers, it is not something they encounter in such a blatant way. Perhaps this is true, because while I’ve always believed in and supported gender equality, it wasn’t until the last year or two that I started to realize that I was on the unequal end of things.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago