Past Imperfect

Past Imperfect

by Julian Fellowes
4.0 25

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Past Imperfect 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
RenitaLovell More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful romp from 1968 to 2008 and back again with Jullian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey. I enjoyed this novel even more than I enjoy Downton. His characters and story are so well-crafted. He has many of the same wit that we see in Downton, with an updated story line on the last of the debutantes and the men they danced with.
Dominican More than 1 year ago
For all of us waiting for the third installment of Downton Abbey, this is a good intermission. Julian Fellowes is fun to read with situations and plots like his famous Abbey classic. Looking forward to whatever else he may write.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A brilliant achievement in which the author blends a masterful non-violent mystery with a deep understanding of the social changes which swept the last half of the Twentieth Century. Because the author is positioned by birth to know his subject from the inside, the insights he presents about the relations between the British upper classes offer wholly new insights, and with regard to both irony and humor, the work is masterful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never a dull page...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Entertaining and compelling. I read it nonstop.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is fun to read. The characters and scenes and locales are what most of us will never know personally, so it's a fun and informative trip through the English upper class of the late 1960s. I will be sad to finish the last book by Julian Fellowes and wait for him to write more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slow begining but ended up being a really good read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be highly entertaining and enlightening. Julian Fellowes is the man behind Downton Abbey. He's good at explaining the English class system, in the form of a fun book. Maybe I especially enjoyed it as the sixties were my time also.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent love story but tragic, the way life can be somtimes.
DianaH-Maine More than 1 year ago
In PAST IMPERFECT by Julian Fellowes, we have an unnamed narrator who is contacted by a former friend, Damian Baxter, to locate a woman who he believed gave birth to his child in 1968. Our narrator reluctantly agrees to this request and begins his quest in a very reflective state of mind and discovers as much about himself (past and present) as he does about the members of a debutante group he was a part of in the late 60s. The story is a bit long, but interesting, detailed, witty and a bit sad. As with Julian Fellowes’ book, SNOBS, the story is told against the backdrop of English class and society. I liked the details of London in the 1960s. I liked the book’s cover art. I became a bit reflective, myself, about past friends and experiences. A great read.
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donnareads911 More than 1 year ago
What a delightful "twisty-turny" romp from high society characters from 40 years ago, to a clever turn of events to the present. There is such empathy for the characters, even the villain. What a great story; I hated for it to end! Well done!
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TheReadingWriter More than 1 year ago
Fellowes is amusing because he is keenly observant, advantageously placed, and both literate and loquacious. He writes of a class of society most of us will never know personally: the rich, the famous, the titled. While we may not aspire to the life these people endure, there is something intrinsically interesting about a life without the more usual set of boring constraints. The narrator, very like our author as described above, says plainly at the beginning of Chapter Two; "I've never been a good judge of character. My impressions at first meeting are almost invariably wrong." Why we then place ourselves in this unreliable narrator's hands has everything to do with the ultimate success of the book. We are always a little off-balance and unsure whether we should trust the narrator's observations. We must put our own considerable experience to work deciding the ultimate value of a piece of information. We discover the rich, the famous, and the titled have similar motivations to our own, and constraints almost entirely of their own construction.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another British drama. A little trite. Everything wraps up in the end. Belgravia a much better book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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