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Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods
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Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods

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by Nina Planck
 

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Ten years ago, Nina Planck changed the way we think about what we eat with the groundbreaking Real Food. And when Nina became pregnant, she took the same hard look at the nutritional advice for pregnancy and newborns, finding a tangle of often contradictory guidelines that seemed at odds with her own common sense.

In Real Food for Mother and Baby,

Overview

Ten years ago, Nina Planck changed the way we think about what we eat with the groundbreaking Real Food. And when Nina became pregnant, she took the same hard look at the nutritional advice for pregnancy and newborns, finding a tangle of often contradictory guidelines that seemed at odds with her own common sense.

In Real Food for Mother and Baby, Nina explains why some commonly held ideas about pregnancy and infant nutrition are wrongheaded--and why real food is good for growing minds and bodies. While her general concept isn't surprising, some of the details might be. For expecting mothers and babies up to two years old, the body's overwhelming requirements are fat and protein, not vegetables and low-fat dairy--which is why, for example, cereals aren't right for babies, but meat and egg yolks are excellent.

Nina shares tips and advice like a trusted friend, and in this updated edition, her afterword presents the latest findings and some newly won wisdom from watching her three children grow on real food.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Nina's real food concept is critical for new parents." —Erica Lyon, author of THE BIG BOOK OF BIRTH

"The antidote to the faddists, alarmists, and kooks who all too often dominate American food discourse." —David Kamp

"A cross between Alice Waters and Martha Stewart." —Washington Post

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781632864598
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
05/10/2016
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
504,828
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Nina Planck is a farmers' daughter, food writer, and farmers' market entrepreneur. She is the creator of the wildly popular London Farmers' Markets. A gifted speaker and a home cook, she is the author of Real Food: What to Eat and Why as well as The Farmers' Market Cookbook and The Real Food Cookbook. She lives in New York City and Stockton, New Jersey, with her husband, Rob Kaufelt, proprietor of Murray's Cheese, and their three children.
NinaPlanck.com
@ninaplanck

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Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nina Planck is an advocate for what she calls 'real food.' These are the staples of our ancestors, prepared in traditional ways. Fruits, vegetables, eggs, meats, cheese, and milk minimally processed if processed at all. Planck provides compelling arguments for eating this way based on nutritional comparisons. While some of the ideas she presents for general eating and eating during pregnancy fall quite far from mainstream thinking, she does provide science to back up her claims. The stories she shares of her own pregnancy and how it shaped her diet are interesting. Although there were some aspects of her experiences that I would not have shared during my own pregnancy (such as having glasses of wine), I was able to take away some good information from this section of the book. Planck lost me, however, when it came to the section on baby's first foods. Essentially she fed her son chunks of various table foods almost from the beginning of his solid food experience. While I do not doubt the nutritional value of the foods she was feeding him, my concern is that some of the foods she mentioned would present a potential choking hazard. I simply cannot imagine letting my eight month old daughter chew on a pork chop! Planck also threw out all conventional wisdom regarding babies and allergies, giving her son many foods before his first birthday that most doctors do not recommend. I enjoyed reading this book and I do feel that I learned something from it. I think each person reading this book will have to find their own comfort level with the information presented and take what they can use while leaving the rest behind.