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Research Advances in Genetics and Genomics: Implications for Psychiatry
     

Research Advances in Genetics and Genomics: Implications for Psychiatry

by Nancy C. Andreasen
 

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Research Advances in Genetics and Genomics: Implications for Psychiatry introduces mental health professionals to exciting breakthroughs in endophenotypes, animal models, microarrays, and genetic mapping, as well as general strategies for identifying the genetic mechanisms of mental illnesses.

Uniquely valuable both as summary and signpost, this concise

Overview

Research Advances in Genetics and Genomics: Implications for Psychiatry introduces mental health professionals to exciting breakthroughs in endophenotypes, animal models, microarrays, and genetic mapping, as well as general strategies for identifying the genetic mechanisms of mental illnesses.

Uniquely valuable both as summary and signpost, this concise volume provides a fascinating overview of recent cutting-edge developments in the application of molecular genetics, genomics, and proteomics to the study of psychiatric populations.

By reading Research Advances in Genetics and Genomics, you will gain a better understanding of • Psychiatric Genetics -- Reviews and assesses the major research paradigms that have emerged in the field of psychiatric genetics over the several past decades, exploring the major conceptual and philosophical issues they pose and the value of their integration.• Molecular Structure of Nucleic Acids -- An overview of the double-helix discovery and provides a context for current endeavors, the original one-page April 1953 Nature paper by Watson and Crick, which sparked a revolution in the life sciences.• Psychiatry in the Genomics Era -- Posits that one of the most important consequences of genomics will be the development of individualized treatments that allow a clinician to tailor therapy on the basis of the unique genotype of each patient rather than on the mean responses of groups of unrelated patients. • The Genomics Revolution -- Details the implications of the genome for future medical practice, including the potential for developing methods and tools to better understand, treat, and prevent major mental disorders.• The Endophenotype Concept in Psychiatry -- Explains the etymology and strategy behind the use of endophenotypes in neuropsychiatric research and, more generally, in research on other diseases with complex genetics, such as schizophrenia.• The Genes and Brains of Mice and Men -- Shows why a detailed assessment of brain function in mice is so important for advancing psychiatric research in humans. Humans and mice share numerous features-in fact, for an estimated 99% of human genes a mouse version may be identified-of brain organization and behavioral responses to many pharmacological agents.• Microarray Technology -- Asserts that microarrays present a methodology for identifying genes or pathways for new and unique potential drug targets, determining premorbid diagnosis, predicting drug responsiveness for individual patients, and, eventually, initiating gene therapy and prevention strategies.

Meticulously referenced, this volume is exceptionally useful as a starting point for understanding the impact of genetics and genomics on psychiatry, serving to introduce psychiatrists, psychologists, neurologists, and geneticists to this exciting field.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Michael Joel Schrift, DO, MA (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: It is unfortunate that in the year 2005, we still do not understand the mechanisms of such common psychopathologies in our field as hallucinations and delusions. Compare this with our understanding of jaundice: most medical students could rattle off the mechanisms involved. Similarly, although we have advanced in developing treatments with fewer side effects (i.e., SSRIs, atypical neuroleptics), we have actually not improved efficacy. Genomics, proteomics, and translational research carry the hope that the explosion on these frontiers will be brought to the bedside or consulting room. This book, edited and written by pioneers in the field, attempts to "translate" this burgeoning science for practicing psychiatrists. The book is an enormous contribution to psychiatry.
Purpose: The purpose of the book, according to the editor is "...to commemorate and honor the 'double helix discovery' and to prepare psychiatrists for the 'genomic era' that will unfold during the 21st century." (I think that era is already here!)
Audience: The intended audience is practicing psychiatrists. Psychologists, social workers, and anyone who is a mental health practitioner would become aware of the relevance of genomics to the sufferings of their patients by reading this book.
Features: The book is divided into seven chapters. The actual paper on the molecular structure of nucleic aids by Watson and Crick published in the journal Nature in 1953 is reproduced here as the first chapter. The other chapters contain excellent reviews written by leaders in psychiatry and include such topics such as psychiatric genetics, psychiatry and the genomics era, the question of whether genomics will revolutionize psychiatry, the endophenotype concept in psychiatry, genes and brains of mice and men, and microarray technology. There is an afterword by Marshall Nirenerg, PhD. Each chapter contains timely and up-to-date citations. The index is helpful.
Assessment: This is an excellent introduction to the exploding knowledge in molecular genetics and its implications for the practice of psychiatry.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585627103
Publisher:
American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/03/2007
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
File size:
18 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Nancy C. Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D., is Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry at The University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, Iowa; Director of The MIND Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico; and Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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