Say It in Russian (Revised)

Say It in Russian (Revised)

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Overview

Contains over 1,000 useful sentences and phrases for travel or everyday living abroad: food, shopping, medical aid, courtesy, hotels, travel, and other situations. Gives the English phrase, the foreign equivalent, and a transliteration that can be read right off. Also includes many supplementary lists, signs, and aids. All words are indexed.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486208107
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 01/01/1983
Series: Dover Language Guides Say It Series Series
Edition description: REV
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 3.69(w) x 5.43(h) x 0.96(d)
Age Range: 11 Years

Read an Excerpt

Say it in Russian


By Michael S. Flier

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1982 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-14931-8



INTRODUCTION

Say It in Russian is based on Contemporary Standard Russian, the literary norm of the Russian language as spoken in the Soviet Union today. Although the standard language is based on the Central Russian dialect spoken in Moscow and differs in a number of respects from the spoken dialects of northern and southern Russia, it is readily understood by all Russian speakers and by most Soviet citizens whose first language is not Russian.

Russian is related to most of the languages of Eastern Europe. As a Slavic language, it falls into the East Slavic group along with Ukrainian and Belorussian (White Russian). The West Slavic group includes Czech, Slovak and Polish, while Bulgarian and Serbo-Croatian are among the South Slavic languages. The 1980 edition of The World Almanac estimates that there are 259 million speakers of Russian, a figure that places it third, after Mandarin Chinese and English, among the major languages of the world.

NOTES ON THE USE OF THIS BOOK

Say It in Russian is divided into sections by topics geared to various situations likely to be encountered by the traveler in the Soviet Union. Such topics include social conversation, travel, eating, shopping, health and illness. The entries in most sections are alphabetized according to their English headings; exceptions are the sections on food and public notices and signs, which are alphabetized according to the Russian to permit quick and easy reference.

In the extensive index at the end of the book, capitalized items refer to section headings and give the number of the page on which the section begins. All other numbers refer to the separate, consecutively numbered entries. The index itself serves as a useful English-Russian glossary; any word not in the section where you expect to find it is likely to be in the index.

Say It in Russian contains words, phrases and sentences likely to be essential for travel in the Soviet Union. This material will serve as an interesting introduction to spoken Russian if you plan to study the language, but will be useful whether or not you study Russian on a formal basis. With the aid of the index, a guidebook, or an English- Russian dictionary, many sentence patterns here will answer innumerable needs. For example, the slot occupied by "Red Square" in the sentence

How long does it take to walk to [Red Square]?


may be filled by any other word or phrase denoting a nearby destination, such as "Gorky Street" or "Hotel Rossiya." In other sentences, the words in square brackets can be replaced with words immediately following (in the same sentence or in the indented entries below it). For example, the entry

Turn [left] [right] at the next corner.


provides two sentences: "Turn left at the next corner" and "Turn right at the next corner." Three sentences are provided by the entry

Give me a seat [on the aisle].

—by a window. —by the emergency exit.


As your Russian vocabulary grows, you will find that you can express an increasingly wide range of thoughts by the proper substitution of words in these model sentences.

A slash is used to separate alternative entries when an English word can be translated by Russian words which are not synonymous:

Factory (heavy industry/light industry).

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]


Please note that while brackets always indicate the possibility of substitution, parentheses have been used to provide additional information. They are used to indicate synonyms or alternative usage for an entry:

Hello (OR: Hi).


Occasionally, parentheses may be used to clarify a word or to explain something unfamiliar to English speakers (such as Russian foods). The abbreviation "(LIT.)" is used whenever a literal translation of a Russian sentence is provided. Parentheses are also used to indicate words that can readily be omitted:

We forgot our keys. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].


The Russian word for "our" is often omitted from this phrase.

Parentheses also indicate different forms of the same word that vary according to gender or number. Though it is not the purpose of this book to teach Russian grammar, parentheses are used to clarify grammatical points necessary for producing correct phrases. Nouns in Russian are either masculine (M.), feminine (F.) or neuter (N.). Adjectives, pronouns, participles and past-tense verbs also vary according to gender and whether they are singular (SG.) or plural (PL.). The entry "I am a student" is translated in either of two ways, depending on whether the speaker is male or female:

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].

[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].


Please note, too, that Russian has no articles (a, an, the) or, in most cases, present-tense forms of the verb "to be"; thus, you can produce sentences of this type without further study:

He is a doctor. [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]. ohn — DOHK-tuhr.

The word "please" has been omitted from many of the sentences for reasons of space. To be polite, you should add [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] whenever you would normally say "please" in English.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Say it in Russian by Michael S. Flier. Copyright © 1982 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

LISTEN & LEARN CASSETTES,
Title Page,
Dedication,
Copyright Page,
INTRODUCTION,
PRONUNCIATION,
THE RUSSIAN ALPHABET,
EVERYDAY PHRASES,
SOCIAL PHRASES,
BASIC QUESTIONS,
TALKING ABOUT YOURSELF,
MAKING YOURSELF UNDERSTOOD,
DIFFICULTIES AND MISUNDERSTANDINGS,
CUSTOMS,
BAGGAGE,
TRAVEL DIRECTIONS,
BOAT,
AIRPLANE,
TRAIN,
BUS, TROLLEYBUS, SUBWAY, STREETCAR, MINIBUS,
TAXI,
RENTING AUTOS (AND OTHER VEHICLES),
AUTO: DIRECTIONS,
AUTO: HELP ON THE ROAD,
AUTO: GAS STATION AND REPAIR SHOP,
PARTS OF THE CAR (AND AUTO EQUIPMENT),
MAIL,
TELEGRAM,
TELEPHONE,
HOTEL,
CHAMBERMAID,
HOUSEKEEPING,
CAFÉ AND BAR,
RESTAURANT,
FOOD: SEASONINGS,
BEVERAGES,
BREAKFAST FOODS,
MISCELLANEOUS DAIRY PRODUCTS,
APPETIZERS,
SOUPS,
SALADS,
MEATS,
POULTRY,
FISH AND SEAFOOD,
VEGETABLES AND STARCHES,
FRUITS,
DESSERTS,
SIGHTSEEING,
WORSHIP,
ENTERTAINMENTS,
NIGHTCLUB AND DANCING,
SPORTS AND GAMES,
HIKING AND CAMPING,
BANK AND MONEY,
SHOPPING,
CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES,
COLORS,
MATERIALS,
BOOKSHOP, STATIONER, NEWSDEALER,
PHARMACY,
DRUGSTORE ITEMS,
CAMERA SHOP AND PHOTOGRAPHY,
GIFTS AND SOUVENIRS,
TOBACCO STORE,
LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING,
REPAIRS AND ADJUSTMENTS,
BARBER SHOP,
BEAUTY PARLOR,
STORES AND SERVICES,
BABY CARE,
HEALTH AND ILLNESS,
AILMENTS,
DENTIST,
ACCIDENTS,
PARTS OF THE BODY,
TIME,
WEATHER,
DAYS OF THE WEEK,
HOLIDAYS,
DATES, MONTHS AND SEASONS,
NUMBERS: CARDINALS,
NUMBERS: ORDINALS,
QUANTITIES,
FAMILY,
COMMON SIGNS AND PUBLIC NOTICES,
INDEX,
ESSENTIAL GRAMMAR SERIES,

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