Shadows at Dawn: An Apache Massacre and the Violence of History

Shadows at Dawn: An Apache Massacre and the Violence of History

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Overview

Shadows at Dawn: An Apache Massacre and the Violence of History by Karl Jacoby

A masterful reconstruction of one of the worst Indian massacres in American history

In April 1871, a group of Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O'odham Indians surrounded an Apache village at dawn and murdered nearly 150 men, women, and children in their sleep. In the past century the attack, which came to be known as the Camp Grant Massacre, has largely faded from memory. Now, drawing on oral histories, contemporary newspaper reports, and the participants' own accounts, prize-winning author Karl Jacoby brings this perplexing incident and tumultuous era to life to paint a sweeping panorama of the American Southwest-a world far more complex, diverse, and morally ambiguous than the traditional portrayals of the Old West.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143116219
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/24/2009
Series: Penguin History of American Life Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 633,869
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Karl Jacoby is an associate professor of history at Brown University and the author of Crimes Against Nature: Squatters, Poachers, Thieves and the Hidden History of American Conservation, which was awarded the Littleton-Griswold Prize by the American Historical Association for the best book on American law and society and the George Perkins Marsh Prize by the American Society for Environmental History for the best work of environmental history.

Table of Contents

Shadows At DawnForeword: Patricia Nelson Limerick

Introduction
A Note on Terminology

Part One: Violence

The O'odham
Los Vecinos
The Americans
The Nnee

Part Two: Justice

Part Three: Memory

The O'odham
Los Vecinos
The Americans
The Nnee

Epilogue

Acknowledgments
Glossary
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Image Credits

Customer Reviews

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Shadows at Dawn: An Apache Massacre and the Violence of History 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
~gray
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I vote thunder...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She is hesitant about who and pushes one to dawns. On to Rock. And one to Leaf.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He pushes his stone to Dawn, Creek and Leaf.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Imediantly revoted for rose rain and dawn. He smiled at rose, happy shes bck
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Votes for lion and wing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She pushes 1 to stone, 1 to rain, and 1 to dawn
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Vg
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The she-cat padded out of the cave, nimbly making her way down to the river. She poked the water with the paw, hissing because of the temprature. She took a deep breath and slipped in. She struggled to the surface, and clung to the bank, the current stronger than expected. Dawn gathered her strength and pulled herself out the river, shivering and dripping wet. "Why don't we live near a warm river." He muttered to herself. She sat down and finished cleaning her wound, which turned out to have healed over the last three moons, the blood had just dried so it looked worse than it actually was. ((We are going to have to move soon...we need to clear the sheet with the inactive members...we've been here for a while too. The cats won't move to a different place, though.)) <br> <p> ~D&alpha&omega&eta&star
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very well done. It was nice to see the book broken up into each individual group that was involved in this sad part of US history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
dokesha More than 1 year ago
I have worked for the Arizona Historical Society in Tucson for over 15 years and thought I knew a lot about this subject. I learned more about the event from this book than any other source I have seen. I really liked reading it from all the different viewpoints.