Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization

Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization

by Sheila Batacharya, Yuk-Lin Renita Wong

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Overview

Treating bodies as more than discursive in social research can feel out of place in academia. As a result, embodiment studies remain on the outside of academic knowledge construction and critical scholarship. However, embodiment scholars suggest that investigations into the profound division created by privileging the mind-intellect over the body-spirit are integral to the project of decolonization. The field of embodiment theorizes bodies as knowledgeable in ways that include but are not solely cognitive. The contributors to this collection suggest developing embodied ways of teaching, learning, and knowing through embodied experiences such as yoga, mindfulness, illness, and trauma. Although the contributors challenge Western educational frameworks from within and beyond academic settings, they also acknowledge and draw attention to the incommensurability between decolonization and aspects of social justice projects in education. By addressing this tension ethically and deliberately, the contributors engage thoughtfully with decolonization and make a substantial, and sometimes unsettling, contribution to critical studies in education.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781771991933
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Publication date: 10/31/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 408
File size: 765 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Sheila Batacharya completed her doctoral studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. She has taught education, women’s and gender studies, criminology and sociology courses at several colleges and universities in southern Ontario. Sheila’s scholarship in embodiment and embodied learning is fueled by her experiences teaching yoga and her curiosity and concern with articulating and practicing attunement to social-sentient embodied experiences in formal education and community contexts. Yuk-Lin Renita Wong is an associate professor at the School of Social Work at York University. Her scholarship and teaching aim at deconstructing the colonial, racial, and gender power relations in the knowledge production and discursive practices of social work, and in re-centering marginalized ways of knowing and being. Mindfulness and social justice are inseparable in Renita's practice in and outside of the academy.

Read an Excerpt

“Instead of privileging the mind over the body / spirit in our intellectual and political projects, embodied learning offers a means for knowledge construction that does not negate the materiality of our being. […] It is also a way for us to interrogate how our consciousness is developed and changed.”—Roxana Ng

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements vii Introduction 3 1 Decolonizing Teaching and Learning Through Embodied Learning: Toward an Integrated Approach 33 Roxana Ng 2 Embodying Indigenous Resurgence: “All Our Relations” Pedagogy 55 Alannah Young Leon and Denise Nadeau 3 The Journey to You, Baba 83 Devi Dee Mucina 4 Being Moved to Action: Micropolitics, Affect, and Embodied Understanding 111 Randelle Nixon and Katie MacDonald 5 Volatile Bodies and Vulnerable Researchers: Ethical Risks of Embodiment Research 135 Carla Rice 6 Resistance and Remedy Through Embodied Learning: Yoga Cultural Appropriation and Culturally Appropriate Services 161 Sheila Batacharya 7 From Subjugation to Embodied Self-in-Relation: An Indigenous Pedagogy for Decolonization 199 Candace Brunette-Debassige 8 Integrating Body, Mind, and Spirit Through the Yoruba Concept of Ori: Critical Contributions to a Decolonizing Pedagogy 229 Temitope Adefarakan9 “Please Call Me by My True Names”: A Decolonizing Pedagogy of Mindfulness and Interbeing in Critical Social Work Education 253 Yuk-Lin Renita Wong 10 Poetry: Learning Through Embodied Language 279 Sheila Stewart 11 Patient Stories: Renarrating Illness and Valuing the Rejected Body 307 Wendy Peters 12 Embodied Writing and the Social Production of Pain 323 Susan Ferguson 13 Class and Embodiment: Making Space for Complex Capacity 349 Stephanie Moynagh 14 Fighting Out: Fractious Bodies and Rebel Streets 369 Jamie Magnusson Afterword 389 Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong List of Contributors 393

What People are Saying About This

Wayne Yang

An extremely refreshing book in what is considered curriculum studies. . . . Squarely situated in a Canadian context where the decolonization struggles of Indigenous people in Canada is the primary source of political, social, economic, and cultural injustice, the book is nonetheless theoretically and empirically rich enough to inform studies of embodiment in North America more broadly.

Roxana Ng

Instead of privileging the mind over the body / spirit in our intellectual and political projects, embodied learning offers a means for knowledge construction that does not negate the materiality of our being. . . . It is also a way for us to interrogate how our consciousness is developed and changed.

From the Publisher

"An extremely refreshing book in what is considered curriculum studies. . . . Squarely situated in a Canadian context where the decolonization struggles of Indigenous people in Canada is the primary source of political, social, economic, and cultural injustice, the book is nonetheless theoretically and empirically rich enough to inform studies of embodiment in North America more broadly."—Wayne Yang, University of California, San Diego

"Instead of privileging the mind over the body / spirit in our intellectual and political projects, embodied learning offers a means for knowledge construction that does not negate the materiality of our being. . . . It is also a way for us to interrogate how our consciousness is developed and changed."—Roxana Ng

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