Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks

Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks

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Overview

Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks by Evan Goodfellow


Ramp tricks—skate moves made on, over, or around wood ramps, cement bowls, and half-pipes—are a key, albeit challenging, component of skateboarding. Hundreds of captioned, sequential photographs demonstrate precisely how these exacting moves are safely made in this indispensable guide to 40 ramp tricks. Beginning with basic moves, including stalls, grinds, and slides, skaters gradually learn the particular positioning and balance needed to perform more advanced tricks such as flips and airs. A brief history of ramp skateboarding examines the birth of the genre as well as champions of the sport, including the pioneering Dogtown Crew and current stars Bob Burnquist and Tony Hawk.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781884654268
Publisher: Tracks Publishing
Publication date: 06/28/2006
Pages: 192
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author


Evan Goodfellow is a sponsored pro skater and skateboard instructor. He is the coauthor of Street Skateboarding: Endless Grinds and Slides and author of Street Skateboarding: Flip Tricks. He has costarred in eight skateboarding videos. He lives in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Tadashi Yamaoda is a skateboarder and skateboarding photographer whose works have appeared in Thrasher and Transworld Skateboarding. He lives in San Diego.

Read an Excerpt

Skateboarding

Ramp Tricks


By Evan Goodfellow, Tadashi Yamaoda

Tracks Publishing

Copyright © 2006 Doug Werner
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-884654-26-8



CHAPTER 1

Ramp tricks

1. Drop in


1. Place your back foot squarely across the tail. Your front foot should be across the bolts of the front truck.

2. The tail should be resting on the coping with the back wheels snug against the ramp.

3. Place all your weight on your front foot as you begin the drop in.

4. Press your weight onto your front leg and push the wheels down to make contact with the ramp.

5. Throughout the drop in, it is important to lean forward so that your weight stays centered with the board.

6. Stay low to the board in order to keep your balance.

7. Most people do not lean forward enough and slip out causing pain to the buttocks.

Key to remember: This trick requires that you push all your weight onto your front foot. Hesitation will almost always result in falling. So just go for it!


2. Rock to fakie


1. Approach the coping with your back foot flat on the tail and your front foot across the bottom bolts of the top truck.

2. Just before your wheels get to the coping, lift up slightly by putting weight on your back foot.

3. As your front wheels lift above the coping and you reach the high point, push the front wheels down on the deck of the halfpipe.

4. It is important that your wheels do not go by the coping but rather go farther onto the deck of the halfpipe.

5. When your front wheels touch down on the deck, immediately rock back on the tail to lift your front wheels. This action will take you back into the ramp.

6. Lean back into the ramp and keep your front wheels lifted until you clear the coping. Then press your front foot back down.

7. You want to have your weight over your back leg to avoid slipping out when your front wheels go up on the deck of the halfpipe and when you are coming back in.


Key to remember: Most skaters just hang their front wheels up on the coping and then unhook them thinking they have done the trick. It takes confidence to learn this trick the proper way and to not worry about hanging up on the coping when you rock back in.


3. Frontside 50-50 grind


1. Approach the coping at a very slight angle.

2. Your board should follow the transition up causing your front wheels to go into the air.

3. When your front wheels leave the ramp and your back wheels are within a few inches of the coping, turn your shoulders so that they are parallel with the coping.

4. Your back truck should lock into 50-50. Aim your front truck so that it lands on the coping as well.

5. When you turn your back truck onto the coping, be sure to stand up over the coping rather than lean back into the ramp.

6. The faster you approach the coping, the faster and longer you will grind.

7. As your grind slows down, put pressure on your back foot and slightly lift your front truck.

8. As your front truck lifts, turn your shoulders back into the transition.

9. Be sure to put pressure on your front foot so that your front wheels touch down on the ramp.

10. Lean forward as you come back in.


The key to this trick is to stand up over the coping as you turn into the 50-50 position.


4. Backside 50-50


1. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

2. Place your front foot over the top bolts on the front truck. Your back foot should be flat across the tail.

3. When you near the coping, lift your front truck so that your back truck can close in on the coping.

4. When you feel the back truck touch the coping, turn your front foot so that your front truck lands on the coping. As your front and back trucks engage the coping, stand up on your board so that you are over the coping.

5. The faster you approach the coping, the faster and longer you will grind.

6. When you slow or stop, keep your balance and lift your back foot. Your front truck should lift and turn back into the ramp.


The key to this trick is to stand up while putting pressure on your heels in order to lock onto the coping and keep from slipping out.


5. Feeble stall


1. Approach the coping as if you were doing a rock to fakie.

2. When your front truck nears the coping, lift slightly by putting pressure on your back foot.

3. As your front truck lifts, turn your shoulders 45 degrees and push your back foot so that your back truck stalls in feeble position.

4. When you are in feeble position, steady yourself and put pressure on your back foot. This will lift your front truck and turn you back into the transition.

5. Push your front wheels down on the ramp and lean forward to ensure balance.


Key to remember:

This trick is one of the easiest stalls on halfpipe because you do not have to worry about hanging up. It is also quite easy to get into the feeble position.


6. Frontside 5-0 grind


1. Before attempting this trick, it is important that you learn how to do frontside carves near the coping.

2. Drop in. Your front foot should be covering the bottom bolts of the front truck. Your back foot should be placed flatly on the tail.

3. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

4. As you near the coping, your front truck should begin rising above the coping. As you feel the back truck near the coping, turn your front foot and shoulders sharply so that your back is to the ramp.

5. The turning of your shoulders and front foot should cause your back truck to lock on the coping running parallel with it.

6. When your truck makes contact with the coping, place pressure on your back foot and hold your board in the 5-0 position.

7. Keep your weight centered over your back foot to ensure you don't slip out.

8. As you begin losing speed, turn your shoulder and feet in toward the ramp.

9. Drop your front foot and shoulder down into the transition for a safe ride away.


7. Backside 5-0


1. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

2. Have your front foot over the top bolts on your front truck. Your back foot should be flat across the tail.

3. When you near the coping, lift your front truck so that your back truck can close in on the coping.

4. When your back truck hits the coping, shift your weight to your back leg. This will keep your front truck from touching down.

5. Put pressure on your back heel to bring the board up and level on the coping.

6. You should be grinding now or at least stalled in 5-0 position.

7. Begin turning your shoulders and front foot back into the ramp.

8. Transfer your weight to your front foot and bend your legs as the front wheels contact the ramp.


8. Frontside lipslide


1. Approach the coping at an angle.

2. When your front wheels are within six inches of the coping, snap an ollie toward the coping.

3. As your board lifts off the ramp, suck up your feet and bend your legs. Rotate your shoulders so the board will land in lipslide position.

4. Land with the middle of the board on the coping.

5. If you stall, you should approach the coping at a bigger angle.

6. When you land on the coping, your front foot should be near the top bolts and partially on the nose.

7. As your slide slows, lean forward and transfer weight onto your front foot.

8. As your front wheels touch down on the ramp, push down on the nose slightly so that your back wheels lift without hanging up on the coping.


The secret to this trick is to sweep your shoulders and back foot around as you come up the transition so that you land in lipslide position.


9. Backside lipslide


1. Approach the coping at an angle.

2. As your front wheels lift above the coping, snap the tail on the ramp.

3. Swing your shoulders around so that your board turns 180.

4. When you snap the tail and ascend the ramp, suck your legs into your chest.

5. Land with the middle of the board on the coping.

6. Extend your legs slightly as you slide.

7. When your slide slows, lean forward and transfer your weight to your front foot.

8. As your front wheels touch the coping, push the nose down slightly so that your back wheels lift and clear the coping. Roll back in.


The secret to this trick is to keep your balance as you turn and land on the coping. Looking into the ramp helps keep your balance.


10. Backside lipslide revert


1. Approach the coping at an angle.

2. As your front wheels lift above the coping, snap the tail on the ramp.

3. Swing your shoulders around so that your board turns 180.

4. As you snap the tail and ascend the ramp, suck your legs into your chest.

5. You want to land with the middle of the board on the coping.

6. When you land on the coping, extend your legs slightly as you slide.

7. While your slide is coming to a stop, lean forward and transfer your weight to your front foot.

8. As your front wheels touch the ramp, push the nose down slightly, turn your shoulders and body and pivot on the front wheels so that you turn 180.

9. When you have completed the turn, push down on your back wheels and ride away fakie.


The secrets here are to pivot on the front wheels and to keep your weight leaning into the bottom of the ramp as you turn.


11. Fakie lip


This trick looks really cool and it's easy.

1. Approach the coping riding fakie.

2. As your back wheels near the coping, bend your knees and shove the board and your feet against the coping.

3. The quick shove or push of your feet should cause the wheels to bump the coping.

4. When you feel the back wheels bump the coping, suck your feet up.

5. The bump should cause your board to pop in the air.

6. When your board pops up, push it down toward the coping so that the middle of your board lands on it.

7. Land in fakie position with your front foot near the nose and your back foot on the tail.

8. Place weight on the nose so that your back wheels lift. Lean forward and ride back in.

9. Weight on the nose and leaning forward should allow your back trucks to clear the coping.


The key is to be very loose when you bump your back wheels into the coping. And be sure to bring your legs up with the bump.


12. Half cab 50-50 stall


1. Approach the coping fakie.

2. When you feel your back wheels just about to touch the coping, put weight on your back foot and turn your board 45 degrees.

3. After turning, your back truck should end up on the coping.

4. Stand up on the board over the coping.

5. The front of your board should be in the air as you turn. When you lock your back truck, place your front truck on the coping.

6. You should now be stalled on the coping in frontside 50-50 position.

7. Put weight on the tail and lift your front truck a bit, then turn back into the ramp.

8. Place weight on your front foot and push your front trucks down on the ramp.


The key is the timing of your turn.


13. Half cab fakie 5-0 stall


1. Approach the coping fakie.

2. As you feel your back wheels just about to touch the coping, put weight on your back foot and turn your board 45 degrees.

3. Your back truck should end up on the coping.

4. Stand up over the coping and put all your weight on your back foot so that your board is in the 5-0 position.

5. You should now be stalled on the coping in frontside 5-0 position.

6. Turn back into the ramp.

7. Place weight on your front foot and push your front truck down on the ramp.


The key is the timing of your turn as you ride fakie.


14. Half cab rock to fakie


1. Approach the coping riding fakie.

2. Your front foot should be across the bottom bolts on your front truck, and your back foot should be on the tail.

3. When your back wheels are about eight inches from the coping, lean back slightly.

4. You want to lean back to lift your front wheels but not enough for the tail to touch the ramp.

5. As your front wheels lift, turn your shoulders 180 degrees. Your board and body will follow.

6. After completing your 180, push your front wheels down on the deck of the halfpipe.

7. Lean back on the tail and lift your front wheels.

8. As your front wheels lift, lean back into the ramp. Push down on your front foot once you have cleared the coping.


The keys are to push your front wheels down on the deck and rock back in without hesitation.


15. Nose stall


1. This trick can be performed by ollie-ing into nose stall (which looks better) or by pressuring in.

2. When your front wheels are about a foot away from the coping, pop an ollie.

3. As you snap the tail and ollie, be sure to suck the tail up and push your front foot down to level the board.

4. When you ollie, move your board and weight toward the coping.

5. When the nose nears the coping, extend your front foot so that your board locks into nose stall position.

6. As you land with your nose on the coping, shift your weight to your front foot, which should be on the nose.

7. When you are in stall, push your back foot down and transfer your weight back into the ramp.

8. Push the back wheels down against the ramp so that you do not slip out.


The key is to ollie into the coping. This requires that you ollie before you reach the coping so that your weight is going into the lip.


16. Frontside tailslide


1. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

2. Your front foot should be placed slightly behind the bolts of your front truck, and your back foot should be placed in ollie position on the tail.

3. When your front wheels are eight inches away from the coping, snap the tail and ollie up toward the coping.

4. Turn your shoulders and body so that the tail is in place to land on the coping.

5. Push the tail and back wheels into the ramp so that you stall in tailslide position.

6. The angle and speed you approach the coping will determine how far you slide as well as the amount of pressure you'll need to hold the board in tailslide position.

7. When you slow down, put your weight on your front foot and lean back into the transition being sure to push your wheels to the ramp.


The keys are to turn your shoulders as you begin your ollie and to lean back on the tail as you near the coping.


17. Backside tailslide

1. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

2. Your front foot should be placed slightly behind the bolts of your front truck, and your back foot should be placed in ollie position on the tail.

3. When your front wheels are eight inches away from the coping, snap the tail and ollie up toward the coping.

4. As you ollie begin turning your shoulders and body so that the tail is in place to land on the coping.

5. Be sure to scoop the tail and ollie back into the coping.

6. As you ollie up toward the coping, push the tail and back wheels into the ramp so that you stall in tailslide position.

7. The angle and speed you approach the coping will determine how far you slide as well as the amount of pressure you'll need to hold the board in tailslide position.

8. As you slow down, put your weight on your front foot and lean back into the transition being sure to push your wheels to the ramp.


The keys are to scoop the tail around and to lean your body back so that you are able to stand up on your tailslide.


18. Backside carve


1. Approach the bowl corner with a fair amount of speed.

2. As you round the corner of the bowl, keep a straight line.

3. When you approach the first corner, suck your weight up by standing up. When you leave the corner, push all your weight down into your legs and push your body and board forward.

4. The feeling is the same as swinging, that is when you were a kid on a swing set. You extended your legs as you went up and bent your legs as you came down, thus creating a pumping motion.

5. The key to carving in a bowl is to create a pumping motion as you go through each corner.

6. Keep all four wheels on the ramp at all times in order to maintain speed.


The keys are to stand up and to keep a straight line as you hit each corner.


19. Frontside carve

This trick is much the same as the backside carve.


1. Approach the bowl corner with a fair amount of speed.

2. As you round the corner of the bowl, keep a straight line.

3. When you approach the first corner, you want to suck your weight up by standing up, and as you leave, push all your weight down into your legs to push body and board forward.

4. Like swinging on a swing, you pump your legs.

5. Creating pumping motions as you go through each corner is vital.

6. In order to keep your speed, keep all four wheels on the ramp at all times.


The key is to stand up going into the corners while keeping a straight line.


20. Backside 50-50 revert


1. Approach the coping at a slight angle.

2. Have your front foot over the top bolts on your front truck. Your back foot should be flat across the tail.

3. When you near the coping, lift your front truck so that your back truck can hit the coping.

4. As you feel your back truck touch, turn your front foot so that your front truck lands on the coping. When your front and back trucks engage, stand up on your board so that you are over the coping.

5. Your approach speed will enable you to grind.

6. When you slow down, lift up your front truck slightly and turn your shoulders back into the ramp so that you are lined up riding fakie.

7. While you are still on your back truck, turn so that it disengages and your back wheels land on the ramp. Be sure to hold your front truck up until it clears the coping.

8. Lean over the back truck to center your balance as you come back in.


The key is leaning back over your back truck when you roll back in.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Skateboarding by Evan Goodfellow, Tadashi Yamaoda. Copyright © 2006 Doug Werner. Excerpted by permission of Tracks Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks,
Title Page,
Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks,
Copyright Page,
Dedication,
Acknowledgements,
Preface,
Ramp tricks,
Resources / comprehensive,
About the author,

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Skateboarding: Ramp Tricks 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reply to Alyssa!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love skateing and i couldent do alot of these tricks but now i can my friends ask me how i learned them i let them read this book and they can do really cool stuff thanks to this book good luck anf NEVER GIVE UP
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its one of the best books youve read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AWESOME BOOK AND THANKYOU