×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Soldiering: Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places
     

Soldiering: Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places

5.0 2
by Henry G. Gole, Russell F. Weigley (Foreword by)
 

See All Formats & Editions


A career in the U. S. Army in the second half of the twentieth century was a passageway to every conceivable locale, hospitable and decidedly otherwise. Henry Gole’s experiences lead the reader through the geography of one such career. The recollections of a professional soldier, Henry Gole’s account is a humorous and interesting tale of a man who

Overview


A career in the U. S. Army in the second half of the twentieth century was a passageway to every conceivable locale, hospitable and decidedly otherwise. Henry Gole’s experiences lead the reader through the geography of one such career. The recollections of a professional soldier, Henry Gole’s account is a humorous and interesting tale of a man who loved soldiering but not necessarily the organization in which he soldiered. He feels the gratification of having served in the U. S. Army during an era when, personal doubts and political controversy notwithstanding, the world depended on America and its armed forces to preserve freedom. He offers the unique perspective of a member of the “silent generation,” those who immediately followed the World War II generation but find themselves often overlooked by historians and the media. From 1952 through 1988, covering the ordinary rifleman’s view in Korea to the Green Beret’s war in Vietnam, Gole also provides fascinating insight into the professional military at war and how these professionals relate to each other, both under great stress and during periods of decompression. Containing a wealth of leadership lessons that will serve as an invaluable guide for junior NCOs and officers alike, this thoughtful and introspective warrior has also written a moving tribute to the brave soldiers with whom he served.

Editorial Reviews

Russell Weigley

"An honest, forthright, even curmudgeonly soldier's memories across a turbulent, stirring half century."—Russell Weigley, author of The American Way of War
Allan R. Millett

"Colonel Gole is the real article . . . A dedicated, accomplished officer . . . A born storyteller. He writes with verve and clarity."—Allan R. Millett, Coauthor of A War to be Won: Fighting the Second World War
On Point: The Journal of Army History

"[Gole] chronicles his life and times with modesty and self-deprecating humor but also with a clear compassion for his fellow soldiers. He displays a keen insight into the organizational dynamics of the Army, an institution in which he takes a great deal of pride. . . . Gole has written an account of his service that will particularly resonate with those who soldiered in the period from the Korean War through Vietnam and its aftermath. Soldiering is accurately titled; it is about the essence of the profession of arms, at its core a profession of ordinary people performing heroically in extraordinary circumstances. The literature of the profession is enriched by the observations of this old soldier, observations that also have relevance for today's warrior."—On Point: The Journal of Army History
Military Collector & Historian

"Gole . . . is a story-teller of note, an officer with extensive combat service and equipped with superb credentials as a writer and historian. . . . A modest man, he chronicles his life and times with modesty and self-deprecating humor, but also with a clear compassion for his fellow soldiers. He displays a keen insight into the organizational dynamics of the Army, an institution in which he takes a great deal of pride. . . . The literature of the profession is enriched by the observations of this old soldier, observations that have relevance for today's warrior."—Military Collector & Historian
Parameters

"The author provides a vivid portrayal of soldiering, honors a parade of deserving individuals, and adds more understanding of our Army operations during the third quarter of the last century. . . . A worthy addition to the Army library."—Parameters
Army

"Gole's strength lies in his portrayal of the soldier's view of events and the feel of matters at that point, which other writers might describe as where the rubber meets the road."—Army
From the Publisher
"An honest, forthright, even curmudgeonly soldier's memories across a turbulent, stirring half century."

"Colonel Gole is the real article . . . A dedicated, accomplished officer . . . A born storyteller. He writes with verve and clarity." --

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781574888539
Publisher:
Potomac Books
Publication date:
09/30/2006
Pages:
290
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Henry G. Gole, Col., USA (Ret.), Ph.D., fought in Korea as an enlisted rifleman and served two tours in Vietnam as a Special Forces officer. He has taught at West Point, the U.S. Army War College, the University of Maryland, and Dickinson College. He is the author of The Road to Rainbow: Army Planning for Global War, 1934–1940. He lives in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Soldiering: Observations from Korea, Vietnam, and Safe Places 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A history of, and an insight into, 1. a soldier 2. a generation 3. a not-so-long-gone era 4. what it means to serve 5. how to grow up and so much more. It is a lesson in honesty, straightforwardness, no-nonsense, no bulls--t leadership, and a standard to refer back to as a reference point in a time when they were the expected norm instead of something to 'spin' to the advantage of a political operative / infotainment "news" talking head / or any of the rest of us when not on our best behavior. Reading Plutarch's 2000-year-old classic, "Lives", makes one realize that we haven't changed since it was written. Reading Gole's "Soldiering" may make us wonder if we're going downhill .... but also shows how we can do better. Read it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am my fathers son...In reading the stories that my father relates, I learned alot about the man who calls me his son. As I turned each page, I became more and more aware of the deep and emotional feelings that he had, and still has, towards the men with whom he served. I learned more about his humble beginings, and learned that he was 'young, dumb and invincable', just like I was. I guess he knew all along about how to be a man. In this book I was reminded of how important family is...not just to my dad, but to me as well. In the stories, the faces of the men that I have had the priviledge to meet, come to the forefront of my minds eye; Boggs, Nadal, Fenlon, Hradecky, Roderick. My dad is right; they are some of the best that this country has offered. I just wish I could have met the ones who never came home. Am I proud of my dad? Yeah! Can I say that he was and still is the best dad a son could hope for? Yeah! Any man can be a father, but it takes a special kind of man to be a dad. Thanks, dad, for telling me your story, and thanks for being my dad.