Submarine Outlaw

Submarine Outlaw

by Philip Roy

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781553801450
Publisher: Ronsdale Press
Publication date: 09/01/2008
Series: Submarine Outlaw , #1
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 254
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Philip Roy continues to travel back and forth between Nova Scotia and Ontario, keeping residence in both places. Whenever possible, he visits the places he writes about in the Submarine Outlaw series. From 1999 to 2001, he lived on the island of Saipan, which features in Ghosts of the Pacific. Recently, he travelled to India to research the fifth book in the series, Outlaw in India, and to South Africa for book six, Seas of South Africa. Book seven, Eco Warrior, will be set in Australia, which he has recently visited. Travelling makes for great adventure, Philip contends. The only thing better is writing about it and visiting schools to share the stories and research with young readers.

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Submarine Outlaw 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
lawral on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Okay, I'll admit it. I was worried about this one. Realistic fiction about a kid who, with the help of a junkyard maven, turns an oil tank into a working submarine? I'm all for fantasy, but huge suspensions of disbelief in a story that is supposed to be realistic, of the kind I thought I was going to have to make right there in the first chapter, are not my strong suit. But then Ziegfried started, matter of factly, building a submarine out of an oil tank. There are almost 80 pages of the building and testing of this submarine, a lot for a 250 page book. It makes for a slow start to the story, but not a slow start for the book. Ziegfried explains everything he's doing as he goes along, ostensibly so that Alfred will be able to handle minor repairs on his own at sea, but really so that we readers will not have to make that huge jump on our own. It's so interesting to read about all the ways he's making sure things float and sink when you want them too, and it is, to my limited mechanical knowledge, pretty realistic.Once the submarine is built, Alfred is off! Along the way he picks up a seagull and a dog, meets a lady who lives alone on an island save her own menagerie of furry and feathered companions, rescues a family at sea, finds some treasure, and gets chased by the coastguard, navy, and excited locals. Looking back, the whole thing is a bit episodic, but while reading, the story is not the least disjointed. The connecting theme is Alfred's realization that the actions of his 14 year old self in his little tiny submarine have consequences, good and bad. Over the course of the novel he learns how to weigh his choices before rushing into a decision, who to trust to help him, and that other people (and a bird and a dog) are counting on him. Basically, during his year at sea, he grows up.The descriptions of how the submarine worked as well as the life at sea and along the coast of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia were incredibly interesting and often beautiful. This series will be a hit with readers interested in oceanography, treasure-hunting (but not pirates), and the general way things work. I can't wait to read about Alfred's next adventure, which will take him a bit farther from home and the relative safety of the coast.If you need another reason to read this book, the paper it is printed on is made of 100% post-consumer waste! It doesn't really have anything to do with the story, clearly, but it's definitely a practice that should be applauded!Book source: Review copy from publisher
jiangyi on LibraryThing 5 months ago
An excellent book! This book proves that you can make unexpected friends in unexpected places (e.g. Alfred meeting a seagull named Seaweed and a dog named Hollie as his first mates) and that you can do anything you set your mind to! (It's not everyday you see someone build a submarine! It must have took a lot of determination!)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an incredible adventure series. My children love Roy's novels, and they're always waiting for the next installment. And then it's a real plus that the main character is so admirable, too. You can't get much better than a story with a boy (Alfred) who travels all around the world in his own homemade submarine--with two fabulous sidekicks for crew members: a dog and a seagull! Alfred is just a great role model for children and teens. Submarine Outlaw was nominated for a Red Maple Award in Canada. It also won first prize in the Atlantic Writer's Competition. If you ask me, Roy should be winning the Forest of Reading awards (also in Canada) every year that he comes out with a new book. We never get tired of reading about Alfred's journeys! The series is a hit with my kids, that's for sure!
Lawral More than 1 year ago
About: Alfred lives with his grandparents in Dark Cove, a small town in Newfoundland. All the men of Dark Cove are fishermen, and it looks as though this will be Alfred's destiny as well. But to be a fisherman, looking out at the sea from the relative safeness of a fishing boat, never straying far from the coastline and certainly never going into the water (most of the fishermen cannot swim even though they spend most of their lives on the water), would kill Alfred. He wants to be an explorer and he wants to explore the depths of the sea. This is where Ziegfried comes in. This intimidatingly large and gruff owner of a junkyard happens to be a mechanical genius. He agrees to help Alfred build a submarine for one, allowing Alfred to escape his grandfather's fishy wishes for him pursue fishy dreams of his own. Review: Okay, I'll admit it. I was worried about this one. Realistic fiction about a kid who, with the help of a junkyard maven, turns an oil tank into a working submarine? I'm all for fantasy, but huge suspensions of disbelief in a story that is supposed to be realistic, of the kind I thought I was going to have to make right there in the first chapter, are not my strong suit. But then Ziegfried started, matter of factly, building a submarine out of an oil tank. There are almost 80 pages of the building and testing of this submarine, a lot for a 250 page book. It makes for a slow start to the story, but not a slow start for the book. Ziegfried explains everything he's doing as he goes along, ostensibly so that Alfred will be able to handle minor repairs on his own at sea, but really so that we readers will not have to make that huge jump on our own. It's so interesting to read about all the ways he's making sure things float and sink when you want them too, and it is, to my limited mechanical knowledge, pretty realistic. Once the submarine is built, Alfred is off! Along the way he picks up a seagull and a dog, meets a lady who lives alone on an island save her own menagerie of furry and feathered companions, rescues a family at sea, finds some treasure, and gets chased by the coastguard, navy, and excited locals. Looking back, the whole thing is a bit episodic, but while reading, the story is not the least disjointed. The connecting theme is Alfred's realization that the actions of his 14 year old self in his little tiny submarine have consequences, good and bad. Over the course of the novel he learns how to weigh his choices before rushing into a decision, who to trust to help him, and that other people (and a bird and a dog) are counting on him. Basically, during his year at sea, he grows up. The descriptions of how the submarine worked as well as the life at sea and along the coast of Newfoundland and Nova Scotia were incredibly interesting and often beautiful. This series will be a hit with readers interested in oceanography, treasure-hunting (but not pirates), and the general way things work. I can't wait to read about Alfred's next adventure, which will take him a bit farther from home and the relative safety of the coast. If you need another reason to read this book, the paper it is printed on is made of 100% post-consumer waste! It doesn't really have anything to do with the story, clearly, but it's definitely a practice that should be applauded! Book source: Review copy from publisher