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Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence
     

Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence

3.0 1
by Robert Epstein
 

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National Indie Excellence Awards, first prize in the Parenting and Family category Arguing that adolescence is an unnecessary period of life that people are better off without, this groundbreaking study shows that teen confusion and hardships are caused by outmoded systems that were designed to destroy the continuum between childhood and adulthood. Documenting how

Overview


National Indie Excellence Awards, first prize in the Parenting and Family category Arguing that adolescence is an unnecessary period of life that people are better off without, this groundbreaking study shows that teen confusion and hardships are caused by outmoded systems that were designed to destroy the continuum between childhood and adulthood. Documenting how teens are isolated from adults and are forced to look to their media-dominated peers for knowledge, this discussion contends that by infantilizing young people, society does irrevocable harm to their development and well-being. Instead, parents, teachers, employers, and others must rediscover the adults in young people by giving them authority and responsibility as soon as they exhibit readiness. Teens are highly capable--in some ways more than adults--and this landmark discussion offers paths for reaching and enhancing the competence in America's youth.

Editorial Reviews

ParentDish.com
Epstein says kids as young as 12 ought to be able to smoke, drink, vote, drive, have sex and fight in combat ... [based on] competence rather than age.
Youthworker Journal
Epstein offers insightful answers to . . . the artificial extension of childhood. Epstein demonstrates how teenagers are isolated from adults . . . [brings] insights . . . to the global problem of extended childhood.
From the Publisher

""I heartily believe in the validity of what he is saying. Furthermore, I believe what he is saying to have vast consequences for our society. All of America should take note."" --M. Scott Peck, MD, author, "" The Road Less Traveled""

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781884995590
Publisher:
Linden Publishing
Publication date:
04/01/2010
Pages:
535
Sales rank:
1,040,890
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.60(d)

What People are Saying About This

M. Scott Peck
I heartily believe in the validity of what [the author] is saying. Furthermore, I believe what he is saying to have vast consequences for our society. All of America should take note.
Newt Gingrich
Adolescence was invented in the 19th century to enable middleclass families to keep their children out of sweatshops. . . . It's a social experiment that failed. Dr. Epstein's book traces the history of the problem, demonstrates with unrelenting perseverance that much of the turmoil of our teens is a creation of our culture, and offers a specific and detailed proposal for getting our young people back on track.

Meet the Author

Robert Epstein, PhD, is the former editor in chief of Psychology Today, a contributing editor to Scientific American Mind, and the host of the radio show Psyched! A visiting scholar at the University of California–San Diego and former university research professor at the California School of Professional Psychology, he is the founder and director emeritus of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and the developer of many parenting, adolescence, and other competency tests. He is the author of many articles and books, including The Big Book of series. He lives in San Diego, California.

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Teen 2.0: Saving Our Children and Families from the Torment of Adolescence 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have this book and I agree that we are infantilizing teens through restrictions and lower standards, and that we need competency- based restrictions, and not age- based restrictions. However, his solutions, such as different competency tests for everything (e.g. sex, voting, drinking, and smoking) I don't agree with. He thinks people of any age who don't know about birth control and protection should not be allowed to have sex. He proposes allowing 5 year olds to vote if they simply know what voting is. If a 4 year old steals we can give him a competency test and if he simply says stealing is wrong/ you can go to jail for stealing then he gets an adult punishment. He doesn't realize some things can only come with age/ time and he never said we should become legal adults when we have independent judgment and foresight skills. He does bring up how people used to marry young, but there isn't any research on whether they were ready for it or regretted it.