The Atwelle Confession

The Atwelle Confession

by Joel Gordonson

Hardcover

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781590794302
Publisher: SelectBooks, Inc
Publication date: 09/28/2017
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 1,049,082
Product dimensions: 6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Joel Gordonson, in addition to being a fiction author, is an international lawyer with degrees received in the United States and from Cambridge University. His first novel, That Boy from Nazareth, received critical acclaim. Midwest Book Review called this historical fiction adventure story set in biblical times “profound, vivid, and highly recommended.”

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From the Publisher

“This one is painted on a broad canvas, woven rich in historical imagery and modern characterization. Lush and lusty, fascinating and smart. Give it a read.” -Steve Berry, New York Times bestselling author of The Templar Legacy

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The Atwelle Confession 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
JBronder More than 1 year ago
Margeaux Wood is researching the Atwelle Church and Don Whitby is the one restoring it. They get talking about the history of the church and how it relates to King Henry and his argument with the Pope. While exploring the church Margeaux and Don discover some gargoyles in the inside of the roof. It seems that people are being murdered in the area in the same sequence as the gargoyles holding the heads. At the same time we follow along as King Henry VIII’s is fighting the Pope over his divorce. We witness the balance we have has he decides what could happen with his breaking with the church. As we read about 1532, we learn that there are murders happening in the same sequence as the gargoyles too. This was an interesting story. I don’t really know much about Henry VIII so I did enjoy learning about that. I think the mystery was well executed and I did not expect the killer at the end of the book so that was a plus. The story did start out a little slow but did pick up the pace. I just had a tough time with the dialog. It seemed rough, the interactions between the characters seems forced. I think this is what made the book tougher to read. But I did like the story. It looks like this is Joel Gordonson’s second book so I do see things flowing better from here. I am interested in reading other books from Mr. Gordonson. I received The Atwelle Confession from FSB Associates for free. This has in no way influenced my opinion of this book.
IrregularReader More than 1 year ago
There’s something odd about St. Clements church in Atwelle, Cambridge researcher Margeaux Wood can feel it. When odd gargoyles are found carved into the eaves of the church during its restoration, her hunch seems to be confirmed. Teaming up with Don Whiby, the architect in charge of the restorations, Margeaux sets out to uncover the story behind the unique carvings. But then there is a murder, and soon another, and the pattern of the murders seems to echo the mysterious carvings in the eves. Furthermore, these murders seem to echo similar crimes committed during the reign of Henry VIII . . . I really liked the concept of this book. The interplay between Tudor England and modern times was well done. Gordonson gives the reader a wealth of historical detail to work with, and I found the balancing act played by both church officials and highly placed citizenry during Henry VIII’s conflict with the Vatican to be truly fascinating. The mystery itself is original and interesting. That being said, I found the execution of the book to be somewhat wanting. The characters of Margeaux and Don, and others central to the plot, feel a bit unfinished. There is little to the characters beyond the immediate needs of the story, nothing about wants, desires, or dreams beyond the gargoyles in the church. Additionally, the antagonists seem to have little motivation for being such. They are acting to foil or to harm our protagonists, yes, but why? There are some nicely suspenseful scenes in this book, with a good creep factor to boot. But I did find that several opportunities for suspense were passed by, possibly to increase the pace of the book. The plot does move quickly, but occasionally feels like it’s stampeding along, sacrificing plot and character development in the process. I guess my overall impression is one of haste. The plot gallops along, leaving us with quick glimpses of something fascinating. Taking the time to give the reader a bit more to work with, to flesh out the characters, the world they live in, and the (really quite interesting) central mystery would have given this book real punch. In all, this is a fantastic idea, with a great amount of attention paid to historical detail. Gordonson is certainly able to craft a compelling story. But I feel that as written, we are seeing only the bare bones of a great story. An advance copy of this book was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.