The Cowboy and the Vampire: Blood and Whiskey

The Cowboy and the Vampire: Blood and Whiskey

by Clark Hays, Kathleen McFall

Paperback

$14.95
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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780983820055
Publisher: Pumpjack Press
Publication date: 02/01/2014
Pages: 376
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.84(d)

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The Cowboy and the Vampire: Blood and Whiskey 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
BuckeyeAngel More than 1 year ago
**I received an ARC of this story in exchange for an honest review This is the second story in The Cowboy and the Vampire series. I didn't realize that when I started to read it, not being familiar with this series previously. In this series, the authors combine two distinct genres, Western and Paranormal, making it a bit different from other books I'd read. This book continues the story of Lizzie, the newly turned vampire originally from NY, and Tucker, the cowboy in Wyoming. Lizzie is adjusting to being a vampire, she's also the Queen of them even though she hasn't proven she has the power she's supposed to have. Tucker, for most of the book, seems more preoccupied with the fact that he's going to have a baby and needs to marry Lizzie, rather than the fact that Lizzie is now a vampire. There were several plots stirring around in the story and I felt the authors did a good job in wrapping them together, giving the story a good plot. Overall the book was well written. I didn't really care for how the story jumped into several perspectives, sometimes making it hard to figure out who is supposed to be narrating. I also didn't really care for some of the characters. I though Lizzie was doing a good job in trying to be a true queen and adjust to life with a human. Tucker was OK. Definitely more of a one-track kind of person. I thought he definitely missed the fact that danger was about to occur. All of that being said, the mixing of the two genres just didn't work for me. I think because they were both distinct within the story. Even though I won't read the other two stories in the trilogy, I would still say it's worth trying for those that think it sounds interesting.
burns_erin More than 1 year ago
I did not receive an ARC of this book, but liked the first book well enough, and am anal enough to read a series in order (I received ARC's of the first and third books), so I picked this up at amazon. This book jumps right in after The Cowboy and the Vampire: A Very Unusual Romance. (IF you haven't read the first book you are going to want to stop right here and go back-major spoilers ahead) We have Lizzie Vaughn the reluctant vampire queen and her erstwhile cowboy lover Tucker. Following the epic and tragic conclusion of the first book, they have returned to Lonepine, Wyoming to settle down with their impending family. Lizzie is still struggling with her new nature, including the fact that she will have to drink blood and kill. And Tucker is still struggling over basically everything, impending fatherhood, Lizzie's new nature, and his own mortality in comparison to Lizzie's immortality. Right when things seemed to be settling down, chaos ensues. Lennie needs a favor, finding his missing niece who has been kidnapped. And just when they are headed out, Rurik, a mysterious and powerful vampire pops up out of the woodwork to enlighten Lizzie on just how precarious the vampire situation is; if she can't turn more vampires, the whole balance of the world will be destroyed. Events are a whole lot more complicated than any of them were expecting challenging love, friendships, and loyalty. This story maintained it's dark humor but showed us a whole more politically savvy side to Lizzie. The writing seemed a lot smoother and more polished than the first book, or maybe I just got used to it, but I didn't struggle as much to determine whose POV I was looking through. What worked for me was the snarky dialogue, Marion (Dad), Lennie, Elita, and the love and devotion between Lizzie and Tucker. I also enjoy how this series blends evolution, morality, ethics, and politics. What didn't work for me was the set up for a love triangle with Rurik coming between the two, I am just not a fan of this trope and I can see potential for this to be truly miserable. Lizzie proved herself to the vampire nation in a most surprising way, heartbreak ensues for all the characters, and Lizzie and Tucker's relationship ends on a solid high point.
BittenByBooksRS More than 1 year ago
As the new Queen of the vampires, Lizzie Vaughn has discovered ruling is not nearly as easy as she thought it would be. dd into the chaos the fact that Lizzie is pregnant, and you get one tired, cranky vampire not willing to take guff off of anybody. But with her cowboy, Tucker, by her side, she feels as though anything is possible. Now, if she can only get the vampiric population to agree with her… Lizzie and Tucker are the perfect couple. Although they do not always see things eye to eye, they have a way of somehow managing to meet in the middle and work it out. The family they have created with Tucker’s dad and assorted friends–-both human and not–-is the driving force behind all that they do, and it shows. Of all of their companions, I think I like the government paranoid Lenny the best. He is like the Q of the vampire world, always coming up with the next thing in vampire extermination gear. Like its predecessor, The Cowboy and the Vampire, Blood and Whiskey is full of action, goofy but lovable characters, and so much humor that your sides will ache by the time you are finished reading. I love that the authors worked in several different races of vampires and gave each a bit of history behind them. Being a huge lover of backstory, having that kind of information enriches the story for me. Also, I always really enjoy the way vampires handle their politics-–it is fascinating and much more amusing than the human version. Blood and Whiskey combines action and emotion with unforgettable characters and an off-kilter sense of humor into one fascinating bronco ride of a story.