The Limits of Alignment: Southeast Asia and the Great Powers since 1975

The Limits of Alignment: Southeast Asia and the Great Powers since 1975

by John D. Ciorciari

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781589016965
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
Publication date: 08/16/2010
Pages: 336
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

John D. Ciorciari is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. He was previously a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Shorenstein Fellow at the Asia-Pacific Research Center, both at Stanford University.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vii

Acknowledgments ix

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms xi

Introduction 1

1 The Appeal of Limited Alignments 16

2 Latter Stages of the Cold War 56

3 The Post-Cold War Era 92

4 Maritime Southeast Asia 131

5 The Mainland Peninsula 176

6 The Prevalence of Limited Alignments Today 211

Conclusion: Key Findings and Implications 239

Notes 257

Glossary 285

Bibliography 287

Index 311

What People are Saying About This

Donald K. Emmerson

By empirically demonstrating the ubiquity of limited alignment by Southeast Asian states since 1975, John Ciorciari usefully redirects our attention toward complexly contingent engagement as normal behavior in international relations. His argument is timely too, in that it showcases responses to uncertainty—a prominent current and likely future condition of (in)security in world affairs.

Yuen Foong Khong

John Ciorciari’s book challenges conventional wisdom about the alignment behavior of developing countries. Based on a systematic and superb analysis of the strategic behavior of ten Southeast Asian states since 1975, Ciorciari argues that most small and medium powers prefer 'limited alignments' with the great powers to balancing against, or bandwagoning with, them. This is an important contribution to international relations theory and Southeast Asian studies.

From the Publisher

"John Ciorciari's book challenges conventional wisdom about the alignment behavior of developing countries. Based on a systematic and superb analysis of the strategic behavior of ten Southeast Asian states since 1975, Ciorciari argues that most small and medium powers prefer 'limited alignments' with the great powers to balancing against, or bandwagoning with, them. This is an important contribution to international relations theory and Southeast Asian studies. "—Yuen Foong Khong, professor of international relations and John G. Winant University Lecturer, Nuffield College, Oxford University

"By empirically demonstrating the ubiquity of limited alignment by Southeast Asian states since 1975, John Ciorciari usefully redirects our attention toward complexly contingent engagement as normal behavior in international relations. His argument is timely too, in that it showcases responses to uncertainty—a prominent current and likely future condition of (in)security in world affairs."—Donald K. Emmerson, director, Southeast Asia Forum, Stanford University

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