The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean

The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean

by Philip Caputo
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Overview

The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean by Philip Caputo

In The Longest Road, one of America's most respected writers takes an epic journey across America, Airstream in tow, and asks everyday Americans what unites and divides a country as endlessly diverse as it is large.

Standing on a wind-scoured island off the Alaskan coast, Philip Caputo marveled that its Inupiat Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, six thousand miles away. And a question began to take shape: How does the United States, peopled by every race on earth, remain united? Caputo resolved that one day he'd drive from the nation's southernmost point to the northernmost point reachable by road, talking to everyday Americans about their lives and asking how they would answer his question.
So it was that in 2011, in an America more divided than in living memory, Caputo, his wife, and their two English setters made their way in a truck and classic trailer (hereafter known as "Fred" and "Ethel") from Key West, Florida, to Deadhorse, Alaska, covering 16,000 miles. He spoke to everyone from a West Virginia couple saving souls to a Native American shaman and taco entrepreneur. What he found is a story that will entertain and inspire readers as much as it informs them about the state of today's United States, the glue that holds us all together, and the conflicts that could cause us to pull apart.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780805096965
Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 07/16/2013
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 118,087
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

Philip Caputo is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including A Rumor of War, one of the most highly praised books of the twentieth century. His novels include Acts of Faith, The Voyage, Horn of Africa, and his most recent, Crossers. He and his wife, Leslie Ware, divide their time between Norwalk, Connecticut, and Patagonia, Arizona.


Philip Caputo is an award-winning journalist—the cowinner of a Pulitzer Prize—and the author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including A Rumor of War, one of the most highly praised books of the twentieth century. His novels include Acts of Faith, The Voyage, Horn of Africa, and Crossers. His book, The Longest Road, was a New York Times bestseller. He and his wife, Leslie Ware, divide their time between Norwalk, Connecticut, and Patagonia, Arizona.

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The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Ocean 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Ahwautukee More than 1 year ago
Road-trips, I really like road-trips, whether it is to Sonoita, Arizona, for a Saturday night or as my wife and I did this past July drive to eight states. It is a great feeling awaking in Deadwood, South Dakota, and wondering where we shall drive to today. As such it was with excitement when Philip Caputo’s new book “The Longest Road” was released, as perhaps he and his wife Leslie Ware completed the ultimate road-trip. Phil is an author I have long admired. I still remember reading his epic memoir “A Rumor of War” when I returned home from Vietnam, which remains the work that most, defines that war. I have enjoyed all 15 of his books and also have a special appreciation for his “Acts of Faith” and more recently “Crossers”. Phil and Leslie begin their ultimate road-trip driving 8300 miles from the southernmost point in the United States (Key West, Florida) to the northernmost point at Deadhorse, Alaska. They were accompanied by their two English setters Sage and Sky and traveled with an old 1962 Airstream. Phil has felt America in recent years was growing in anger and division and he simply wanted to discover what is holding people together if anything. The journey was enjoyable reading, not just for the places they visited, but the stories of the people they met. They tended to avoid the interstates and large cities so primarily the travel was through a kinder and gentler nation. He mixes humor throughout the story, especially describing various episodes of exchanges between his wife Leslie and himself. When one is married to a Leslie (which I also am) you know the road traveled will never be dull. I am not sure if Phil really discovered the reason of anger in America or what is keeping people together, although I do know that when I finished this book I felt good and I felt happy.
SPL More than 1 year ago
Caputo has made home travel possible through a detailed diary of his own adventure. He takes on a trip across America....REALLY across Americaa. Along the way he shares the stories of real America-the one we sometimes forget that exists. Very reader friendly and exceptional writing that allows you the privilege of a passenger on a trip of a lifetime.
KrabbyAbby More than 1 year ago
My husband and I loved it. We have been travelers for a long time and could relate. I found myself laughing out loud many times. What a delightful book! Thanks Phillip Caputo for putting into words so many of our experiences.
Jamie6 More than 1 year ago
An interesting and entertaining journey with a purpose of defining what keeps the U.S. united. I enjoyed the easy going writing style and the sheer volume and variety of answers.
Drewano More than 1 year ago
“The Longest Road” follows a couple as they trek across America in an attempt to find out what keeps America together after 200+ years. The story starts off well with some interesting takes from people and their interesting tales comparing today to the past. Unfortunately, like the Midwestern storms the couple encounters in the great plains, the story gets blown off track in the middle and the people they meet from there on are interesting but not necessarily insightful in the couple’s quest. Over all the idea has great promise but in the end I felt it wound up being a bit more of a travel journal rather than a “finding of America”.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Name is up there. Gender shecat. Age is old enough. Rank is...warrior.(though i woukd like to be deputy).
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