The Newcomer (Amish Beginnings Series #2)

The Newcomer (Amish Beginnings Series #2)

by Suzanne Woods Fisher

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780800727499
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/31/2017
Series: Amish Beginnings Series , #2
Pages: 336
Sales rank: 323,651
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Suzanne Woods Fisher is an award-winning, bestselling author of more than a dozen novels, including Anna's Crossing, The Bishop's Family series, and The Inn at Eagle Hill series, as well as nonfiction books about the Amish, including Amish Peace and The Heart of the Amish. She lives in California. Learn more at www.suzannewoodsfisher.com and follow Suzanne on Twitter @suzannewfisher.

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The Newcomer (Amish Beginnings Series #2) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Laundry_Whispers More than 1 year ago
'The Newcomer' starts right where 'Anna's Crossing' left off. Anna and the rest of her community are waiting to be cleared to leave the ship, Jacob has met them at the dock with promises of the land he has chosen. Not all are as certain of his choice to be so far from the trade routes and civilization but he's been there a year and believes it's the best opportunity for them. Bairn comes across an opportunity for one last trip, one last sail, and money that he thinks is desperately needed to secure a hopeful future. Anna is torn by his decision but accepts it with the promise that he would return in the spring with her Grandparents. Before he leaves, Bairn finds another traveler who is looking for like minded Christians who wish to separate from society and follow God's will. Bairn brought the New Comer back to the rest of the group and hence, we have a book. I wasn't very fond of this New Comer, Henrik, from near the beginning. I didn't appreciate his take-over attitude. He wasn't take charge as in find his spot in the leadership but more a my way is better. This story is set within 3 different environments that meshed together well and the story seamlessly integrated between the different story lines. Jacob and Dorothea left before their church, mostly so Jacob could attempt to hid how unwell he had become. Henrik capitalized on this absence to attempt to insert his way into a leadership position. Even going so far as to take advantage of Anna to make it happen. Felix found a way to stow himself away on the ship with his brother. There was an entire story within a story there by the way. Bairn had difficult choices to make and a reckoning to deal with. However, Felix's penchant for mischief brought that to a satisfying conclusion. By the end all were back where they needed to be and ready to step into the next direction on their New World adventure. Fisher, again, does an amazing job of placing you in the moment with these characters. I felt Anna's uneasiness with Bairn leaving 'one last time'. I felt her panic when Felix could not be found. I felt Christian's uneasiness at trying to lead their group in the absence of the bishop and trying to find ways to move forward in a way that suited everyone. I even found myself in Maria with her overwhelming fear. I felt Dorothea's strength as she met new people and attempted to nurse her husband back to life. I appreciate what they have given up to get where they are and I am desperate to finish this journey with them all.
Laundry_Whispers More than 1 year ago
'The Newcomer' starts right where 'Anna's Crossing' left off. Anna and the rest of her community are waiting to be cleared to leave the ship, Jacob has met them at the dock with promises of the land he has chosen. Not all are as certain of his choice to be so far from the trade routes and civilization but he's been there a year and believes it's the best opportunity for them. Bairn comes across an opportunity for one last trip, one last sail, and money that he thinks is desperately needed to secure a hopeful future. Anna is torn by his decision but accepts it with the promise that he would return in the spring with her Grandparents. Before he leaves, Bairn finds another traveler who is looking for like minded Christians who wish to separate from society and follow God's will. Bairn brought the New Comer back to the rest of the group and hence, we have a book. I wasn't very fond of this New Comer, Henrik, from near the beginning. I didn't appreciate his take-over attitude. He wasn't take charge as in find his spot in the leadership but more a my way is better. This story is set within 3 different environments that meshed together well and the story seamlessly integrated between the different story lines. Jacob and Dorothea left before their church, mostly so Jacob could attempt to hid how unwell he had become. Henrik capitalized on this absence to attempt to insert his way into a leadership position. Even going so far as to take advantage of Anna to make it happen. Felix found a way to stow himself away on the ship with his brother. There was an entire story within a story there by the way. Bairn had difficult choices to make and a reckoning to deal with. However, Felix's penchant for mischief brought that to a satisfying conclusion. By the end all were back where they needed to be and ready to step into the next direction on their New World adventure. Fisher, again, does an amazing job of placing you in the moment with these characters. I felt Anna's uneasiness with Bairn leaving 'one last time'. I felt her panic when Felix could not be found. I felt Christian's uneasiness at trying to lead their group in the absence of the bishop and trying to find ways to move forward in a way that suited everyone. I even found myself in Maria with her overwhelming fear. I felt Dorothea's strength as she met new people and attempted to nurse her husband back to life. I appreciate what they have given up to get where they are and I am desperate to finish this journey with them all.
sh2rose More than 1 year ago
The Newcomer, the second in the Amish beginnings series by Suzanne Fisher Woods holds more than an Amish story. Finding your true self, staying loyal to family, or holding onto the past are themes throughout the novel. Anna has loved Bairn since her time on the ship coming over to America but he has changed since finding his real family. Bairn only knows the sea and remains in turmoil with his choices now that he has found his kin. As the settlers land, they discover their dreams will be harder to accomplish and many obstacles unknown to them stand in their way. Someone new to them helps them on their way, but Bairn's parents seek the land that his father purchased for the community and he opposes their decision. This fascinating story even includes Benjamin Franklin and held my attention to the last page. I look forward to the next installment of the Amish Beginnings series. I received a copy of The Newcomer from NetGalley for my honest opinion which I have given.
Christa4 More than 1 year ago
The Newcomer, an Amish Beginnings Novel, by Suzanne Woods Fisher is a historical treasure! There is so much rich and fascinating Amish history in this book! Bairn Bauer wants to leave the sea and sailing for good and settle with his family and his one true love, Anna Konig, in the New World. However, there is one final trip back to England he feels he must make. Something is still unsettled inside of him. Anna is devastated, but she continues to press on for her church, her community. Will Bairn ever return? Will Anna continue to wait for him? This book is one that you will have a hard time putting down once you start reading it! There are unexpected surprises throughout the story. Suzanne Woods Fisher does a great job of bringing the characters to life, you will feel like you are right there with them in this beautiful, yet uncertain New World! I voluntarily reviewed a copy of this book from NetGalley and have given my honest opinion.
MarB1 More than 1 year ago
What a pleasure to discover that Suzanne Woods Fisher has written a sequel to Anna’s Crossing! In The Newcomer, I enjoyed reading Bairn’s story; how he tried to find a way between his love for the sea and Anna. The church of Ixheim tries to start a new life in the New World, but meets many challenges. The characters were wonderful and I loved reading from the different POVs from Anna, Bairn, Dorothea and young Felix—what a joy this last one was! The author drew me in and made me want to continue reading—the signs of an excellently written book.
Heidi_Reads More than 1 year ago
I absolutely loved the first book in the Amish Beginnings series, Anna's Crossing. I was thrilled when I learned that it would become a series and we had two more books to look forward to, continuing Anna and Bairn's story. The Newcomer picks right up where Anna's Crossing left off, so I highly recommend reading Anna's Crossing first in order to get to know the characters and especially to understand Anna and Bairn's relationship. In The Newcomer we also get the point of view from Bairn's mother Dorothea and his little brother Felix. I appreciated that as some members of the church become separated we are able to see what is happening with each smaller group. Felix adds plenty of humor to the story with his curiosity and talent for getting into scrapes; he was one of my favorites in this book! Dorothea and Bairn's journeys were far apart in miles but paralleled in spirituality. They both did quite a bit of soul-searching and I loved the theme of drawing closer to God in order to find peace in the midst of tribulation. Anna endured the complaints and uncertainty of the church members at the homestead with grace and compassion, which is what I love most about her character. Henrik's optimism helped her during this anxious time when Bairn was absent, but the foreshadowing woven in had me feeling anxious and I just wanted to quickly read to see how the book would end, how Anna would choose between these two men. I missed the interaction between Anna and Bairn that made me love the first book, so I'm hoping that the next book will offer more in the romance department ;) (I received a complimentary copy of the book; all opinions in this review are my own)
poochiepepper More than 1 year ago
What a great new series. Love the history plus it's Amish History. To have the courage to cross the ocean and forge a new life in a new unexplored country. I absolutely cannot wait for the next book. Adventure around every corner!! There is even a "snake" in the new Garden of Eden.
Dawn-Read_Love More than 1 year ago
The Newcomer is the second book in Suzanne Woods Fisher’s Amish Beginnings series. Let me assure you, since I’ve not yet read book one, Anna’s Crossing, you can pick up The Newcomer without any prior knowledge and completely enjoy it. In fact, Ms. Fisher originally wrote Anna’s Crossing as a stand alone novel. It was only after years of readers’ requests for a sequel that the tale developed into a series. And it’s only natural that readers wanted more since The Newcomer begins in late 1737, soon after a group of German Amish immigrants emigrate to the New World. Anna’s Crossing chronicles Anna’s group’s voyage to the New World, and The Newcomer tells us about their journey toward settlement. Indeed, in many ways The Newcomer is about journeys – physical and spiritual, personal and communal. Other thematic elements include pain and loss, dealing with the past, forgiveness, freedom, family, community, leadership, faith, God’s providence, and perseverance. A true historical novel, The Newcomer will teach you a thing or two! For instance, you might learn about ships, naturalization (there’s an interesting story about the Amish immigrants’ views on the Oath of Allegiance and the resultant changes that were made so they could take the oath in good conscience), Penn’s Woods, or about what led the Amish to leave their homeland. You might even learn a bit about Benjamin Franklin: Good ol’ Ben appears in the novel, working as a printer in Philadelphia. You’ll really enjoy his character and his wit, including the wise sayings of his alter ego Poor Richard — and their German counterparts (and possible origins). One of my favorite proverbs mentioned in The Newcomer is “Ken Rose ohne Dornen,” which translates to “there is no rose without a thorn.” On top of Mr. Franklin’s humor, a young Amish boy named Felix supplies plenty of smiles and laughs. In addition to levity, Fisher uses short chapters with brief, alternating story lines to carry her plot along without delay. The result? You’ll be turning the pages so quickly you’ll forget you’re reading historical fiction! I certainly enjoyed my stay in early 18th century Pennsylvania. Though it was definitely not a place for the faint of heart, it’s easy to see the promise that our then young country held for those who faced oppression and possibly even danger for simply practicing their faith, as well as understand why they were willing to endure hardship and combat fear to secure their religious freedom. Verdict: 4.5 of 5 Hearts. Thoroughly Historical and Wholly Enjoyable Amish Fiction. With her latest novel, The Newcomer, Suzanne Woods Fisher has successfully accomplished several ticklish feats. She has written an engrossing sequel that also reads perfectly well as a stand alone; her novel is thoroughly researched yet fast-paced and easily read; she’s crafted likeable and memorable characters (some of whom are even based on real people!); and she’s tied it all together in a beautiful bow that teaches her readers about faith and leaves them with an uplifting message: “There is always something to fear. There always will be. But God will be with us wherever we go.” *Disclosure of Material Connection: I would like to thank Revell Reads for providing me with a copy of this title. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
RockandMinerals4Him More than 1 year ago
First of all, this is most certainly an Amish book that breaks several stereotypes! First, it's set in the 1730's, which is far from the standard modern-ish feel. Second, as a result of this, there is none of the buggy-riding, courting, singings, and all that. Instead, it's a travelling-westward kind of story, which is really cool. I appreciated this book much more than most other Amish fiction (though admittedly I don’t read much Amish fiction as a rule) because it's much more realistic. While yes, there still are some touches of romance, it’s not the main focus of the book. There is not only love between a guy and a girl, there is also love between a man and his wife, and the siblings within a family, and people and God. This was really refreshing. Overall, the Amish portrayed in this book were much more realistic than the other Amish novels that I’ve read, which makes me want to read more by Suzanne Woods Fisher . . . not sure how her other novels are like though. These Christians are much more authentic, not the pure, unblemished, but-under-the-surface-there's-problems, kind of book that most books portray. Apparently this was the second book in a series, but I didn't know at the time. The characters were all pretty well introduced, and I didn't feel like I was starting in the middle of a series too much (although I was confuzed with a couple characters in the beginning, but that's just because I'm bad at character names in books in general). As for the characters, I really liked how they were developed. As I’ve mentioned, I’m pretty bad at actually identifying and differentiating between characters as I read: they all become mashed together in my mind, but these characters each had their own personality: Anna, Bairn, Felix, the awful dog, and Dorothea (as well as many more). Overall, this was a great book! I know I've already said it about 143980437 times above, but it was really good simply because it wasn't the typical Amish romance novel. It was more of a Christian Laura Ingalls Wilder Amish book, and I really appreciated that.
Chautona More than 1 year ago
The story takes place circa 1730, and because of that, you have a unique storyline. This isn't your hackneyed "sweet Amish girl untainted by the Englishers and pure as the wind-driven snow." Nope. Thank goodness. This also isn't yet another story about quaint Amish people in tourist Lancaster County. These aren't romanticized by the people in the area surrounding them. It's a little like a city full of Catholics and some Baptists move in. There's a difference in theology, and they don't want to be influenced by beliefs they don't agree with, but they're not so far removed from those around them that they're considered "quaint" or a novelty. Better yet, Ms. Fisher didn't romanticize them in the way that much of modern Amish fiction does. These characters are sinners. They have pride. And they deceive. They try to live their faith, and they fail. Just like Christians do in every church in every town in America. Sometimes Amish fiction can feel like that--like the sins the authors reluctantly give their characters are token sins. "She wanted to protest--to insist that she wouldn't serve the mean sheriff who handcuffed the criminal and hit the man when the man tried to dive for his gun. No! Oh, but she must. She must! She must turn that other cheek." Gag. You won't find that nonsense in this book. Thank you, Ms. Fisher. Add do that a well-researched book, and you have a compelling story that not once did I go, "Wait. That's anachronous. They didn't have wristwatches in 1736!!!" Considering that I almost always find something, I consider this important. Word choice. Another of the problems I tend to find in historical fiction is that often the authors use words that either are too modern for the era or feel too modern. I think it happened a couple of times in this book because I recall having a moment where I was pulled out, but the storyline popped me right back in. I can't tell you what they were. They were that minor. However, there was one. Look, I don't know when the old "glass half full or half empty" saying was first spoken, but it feels crazy modern. It jerked me out of the story so fast it wasn't even funny. But really. REALLY? That's the only thing that fully jerked me out? It's pretty impressive, don't you think? And of course, the cover. Look at that cover. She looks Amish. Excess makeup that makes her look like an Amish cover girl? NOPE! Is she wearing makeup for the photo? Probably. But who cares? She doesn't LOOK like she has mascara, eyeliner, eyeshadow, and lipstick. That's not always the case. But that isn't anywhere near the best part. In all great books, there will be a quote--one that just stands out from the rest and lingers in your heart long after you may have forgotten the details of the story. Often these quotes are life-changing in some way. This book has one of those enduring quotes. I wanted to share the whole paragraph because it's that good. But Felix had no doubt Bairn would know how to solve this problem. He could fix anything. He was a fine leader, his brother. Even Squivvers said so. The sailor told him that the best leaders were the ones who didn't even realize they were leaders. "Good leaders don't try to grasp it," Squivvers had said "They live a life worthy of being followed." Does that describe Jesus or WHAT? It's Mark 10:42-43 in 1736 or 1737 by that point?!! The quote is so good that I missed the mixed pronouns the first time or two. And while I genera
Moonpie72 More than 1 year ago
A group of Amish from Germany undertake the long and difficult journey to Pennsylvania under the leadership of Jacob Bauer. He had been before them and claimed land to start the new community. They were a small group and the only one that spoke English was Anna. While on the ship they discover the Bauer’s son that was lost many years ago, now a grown man. He was also Anna’s sweetheart. While the group stays back in Philadelphia to sort out legal matters, Jacob insists on going head to the land with his wife with instructions on how to find him. Unknown to his congregation, he becomes seriously ill along the way and is taken in by another religious group called the Ephrata Community. The group is struggling without leadership, when a newcomer appears on the scene and asks to join their group. He appears to be just what they need. His charm, wisdom, knowledge of scripture and the land impress the people. He begins to help and guide the people. Thinking Jacob is dead they begin to turn to him. I loved the characters!!! Anna’s displayed faith and steadfastness, not only in God’s Word but also in her quiet but strong influence among the people. Bairn their reunited son taught such a strong lesson in making hasty decisions and not taking time to see what one really wants. His little brother Felix was a hoot. I laughed at his escapades and all the trouble he innocently found himself it. His curiosity and reasoning for his actions let you into the mind of an 8 year old boy. I love Dorothy, Jacobs’s wife. Her gentle and loving spirit, not to mention her courage as she found herself in a totally new environment and religion while facing her husband’s death, was inspiring. The newcomer was certainly mysterious and seemed to be an incredible man, but things may not be as they appear. Each character was so developed as to their personalities and what was behind their actions. They all added to the story and made it very interesting. This was a fantastic book. I enjoyed it immensely! It had it all: history, romance, mystery, testing of faith, trials, and many spiritual lessons. I especially like all the surprises, twists, and turns in the plot! I never saw them coming! I have not read the 1st book of this series but this one can be read as a standalone. You will want to read this book! I received this book from Revell Publishing. The opinions I have stated are my own.
Britney_Adams More than 1 year ago
The Newcomer is the second installment in the Amish Beginnings series. Although I have not read Book 1, Anna’s Crossing, I was able to follow the story line and enjoy this book as a stand-alone story. As Anna Konig and the other Amish settlers enter the New World, unexpected happenings abound. I enjoyed the wealth of history woven through their story, as well as the threads of mystery and romance. Anna and Bairn share a dramatic journey, one I look forward to following as this series continues. I received a complimentary copy of this book. No review was required, and all thoughts expressed are my own.
centraleast22 More than 1 year ago
I cannot imagine what it would be like to leave everything and start a new life like Anna did. It would be hard enough to leave in modern times when you can go to the nearest store to get everything you need, but to try to set up a house and live on the frontier would be something else. I enjoyed seeing Anna's romance and learning how she chose who to give her heart to and I really enjoyed seeing the twist in the story and how it all came together. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, the review is my own.
lolly-pops More than 1 year ago
First, the disclaimer. "I was provided a free copy of this book. All opinions are my own." That done, I love Suzanne Woods Fisher’s contemporary Amish books and I probably shouldn’t have requested this one because I didn’t love Anna’s Crossing. It was hard for me to read the history of the Amish on the ship. I recognize it is based on real life history, but that doesn’t make it easier! I hoped THE NEWCOMER would be less slow and hard to read. But I still found this book really difficult for me to get into. There is a lot of real life (nonfiction) characters included, and a lot of real life (nonfiction) history of the area, so part of it almost seems like an information dump. I also never really was able to connect with the main characters Anna and Bairn (or Hans). As a whole, Ms. Fisher’s writing style is top-notch and I love the way she seamlessly weaves in a faith message. Ms. Fisher is one of the top Amish writers with good reason. As a rule she writes with wit, faith, and well-developed characters with an interesting storyline. This book – THE NEWCOMER – is second in the series, and readers should read Anna’s Crossing before reading this as they are tied together. You probably won’t be lost if you don’t, but it might help to make you more invested in the characters if you experience the hardships with them from the beginning. If you like historical Amish books, then Ms. Fisher’s are ones to consider. She puts a lot of time and effort into research to get the details exact and it shows.
Bookworm_Debbie More than 1 year ago
This is an incredible historical romance! This is part of a “true” series. You need to read book one before reading this one to get the full enjoyment out of it. I loved the characters in this book. They are extremely well developed. I connected with Anna Konig in the first book and thoroughly enjoyed seeing her growth and maturity in this book. The different personalities of the members of the little group from Ixheim, Germany are so realistic. I can see people I know represented by each of them. I was fascinated with the detail presented about the early Amish settling in America. The fact that some of the legal requirements for immigrants had to be adjusted was totally new to me. I am looking forward to finding out what happens for this community in the next book. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher. I have chosen to write this review to express my personal opinion. Disclaimer: *Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention/review it on my blog. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion - which I've done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own and I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.*
ARS8 More than 1 year ago
The Newcomer by Suzanne Woods Fisher is her continuing story in the Amish Beginnings novels and we start off where the first book has left off. This little Amish church that has been through persecution in their old country has now arrived at the Promised Land in America. Jacob and Dorothea have been reunited with their long lost son Bairn, and Anna is ready to move forward in this new place and begin anew with Bairn. However doubts and fears begin to arise and this looks like it will not be a pleasant move forward. This is not like your typical Amish fiction. The story shows the bravery these poor souls needed to endure the rigorous pioneer life and new challenges: Native Americans, French and British hostilities, and new sicknesses they had to face. Bairn has real doubts about this new life facing him. He loves Anna and his family, but he has been away from the Amish lifestyle for so long he is unsure if it is right for him. Poor Anna in many ways is alone in this world and I could feel her longing to belong and for her community to survive. She is hurt deeply by Bairn and when he asked for her to wait for him I understood Anna’s hesitation. I also understood why Bairn wanted to make sure this was what he wanted. Ms. Woods did a great job of putting us in both of their shoes and seeing all sides. This church is struggling and at times does not seem to be making wise choices. I understand that they wanted to live apart from the rest of the world, but in my mind it did bring up some questions. I know that we as believers are not of this world any longer, but we are still living here and we are required to be the lights. It was also interesting as the author shows us some other religious groups and their ways of life, even to the extreme that they felt called to live. All in all this was an interesting historical read about the beginnings of the Amish and the world that they lived and the part they played in America’s big melting pot. I am very interested in how this series wraps up. We are left with hope and trouble at the end of each book and I look forward to continue on this journey with Anna, Bairn, and this little Amish community. I received a copy of this book for free. I was not required to give a positive review and the views and opinions expressed are my own.
conniet729 More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed reading about the Amish coming to America. I had read "Anna's Crossing" and loved it! This book did not disappoint. I loved how the author combined the history and the story. The words flowed off the page nicely. I love that the story is woven together with faith, love, adventures and so much more. The author is known for her brilliant Amish Fiction stories - and this one falls into its rightful place. Suzanne Woods Fisher was one of the first authors that I read when I started reading Christian Fiction LOVED this book I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
Kathae More than 1 year ago
I've become a big fan of Suzanne Woods Fisher's books, and The Newcomer is just another reason why. The writing is well-done and easy to read, the characters are real, and the plot builds and is never cumbersome. It was interesting to read about this group of people introduced in Anna's Crossing, and see the growth in all of them. The difficulties of traveling and settling in the New World at that time were huge. On top of the physical difficulties, there were language barriers, fear of Indians, and the political unrest. It was really neat so have some cameo appearances by famous early Americans! Although the second in the series, it reads well as a stand-alone. I truly enjoyed this book and recommend it to fans of historical fiction and Amish fiction. I received this book from the publisher, Revell, through Celebrate Lit, for review purposes. The thoughts expressed here are my own.
eLynda More than 1 year ago
The Story Continues... This book is the second installment of Amish Beginnings and is a fictionalized account of Amish immigration to what would become America. This book picks up after the sea voyage and chronicles the hardships of adjusting to a new and very different environment, finding the land their representative had purchased, and dealing with sickness. I enjoy how we follow the same people from Anna’s Crossing; it gives the author time to further flesh out the characters and place them into a new setting facing new challenges. Those characters are incredibly complex and their emotional struggles are believable and, at times, heartwrenching. As the reader, we get to watch their growth and eventual grounding in who they are based on the experiences they have endured and overcome. The setting and time period is an integral part of this novel. Another time or location would be impossible and the author does a great job of supporting the action with historical details based in the locale. I imagine the conditions and the complete other-ness they faced in this new world could have been overwhelming at times, but the characters help each other (and the reader) interpret the events and give them context within the times. The spiritual content is strong within this novel—because the characters are obviously devoted believers, Biblical content never seems forced or tacked on to give the book a Christian label. Personally, I love the parallels and direct references to the exodus and the Israelites’ desire to return to Egypt because the suffering in slavery was expected and a known variable while they had no idea what to expect in their new home. Understanding that we aren’t so different from the Israelites is reinforced by the fictional people within these pages, reminding me that I have more I common with people of the past than I do different from them. Because this is a true series in that it is a continuing storyline following the same primary characters, I would strongly recommend reading the first book in the Amish Beginnings series before starting this one. While possible to follow the plot and catch up, it will be far more meaningful for readers who have encountered the characters before. I received a free copy of this book through Celebrate Lit but no compensation for this review. I was not required to write a favorable one and the opinions expressed are both honest and my own.
RGNHALL More than 1 year ago
Imagine being stuffed like sardines in the lower deck of a ship for ten weeks, unable to even stand up in the quarters, but having to bend over to walk. Only to arrive and find obstacles.....and Indians! And the plan to go to an unsettled wilderness...when they've landed in a settled and very nice city. Anna and Bairn and the other settlers find themselves in just such a predicament. But Bairn deserts Anna for the sea and Henrik is here on land, beside her, and very attractive, persuasive, and positive. In fact, Henrik positively exudes a happy energy that spreads to the others. As I read the book, I was fascinated. I imagined the sheer excitement AND the sheer terror the Bauer family felt. To inhabit a land that is so markedly different from their homeland and so barren of other people and homes. They started out with one cabin built by Jacob Bauer and his unlikely Indian (Native American) friend. I wondered what it would be like to work alongside an Indian, neither of us able to verbally communicate and yet, working in harmony. Wow! just Wow! I don't think I'm adventuresome enough to handle the New World as this group of church members did. The most adventuresome I've been in that regard was to move from Virginia to Texas for my husband to attend seminary along with our two little daughters in tow. We traveled on land in motor vehicles and didn't have to rely on horses and carts to move our belongings. We moved into a small apartment, granted we had never seen so much as a picture of said apartement. We were fortunate to be surrounded by other seminary students and their families and a large seminary with eager professors and administrators to point us in the right direction. I have great admiration for these settlers of Pennsylvania, and after reading Suzanne's novel, my admiration has grown. Thank you, Suzanne, for expanding my world and my vision and for making me very keen to conduct my own research on the Amish who settled in Pennsylania to escape the persecution of Germany and a few other European countries. This is a top-notch novel. Suzanne Woods Fisher never fails to deliver an amazing piece of literature when her fingers hit those keys. What could I rate this novel other than 5 stars? Well, I could give it 10 or 20 but most rating systems are based on a scale of 1-5, BUT it is my novel after all as a recent facebook commenter suggested, so I will give it 5+ and leave it to future readers to determine their own rating! This book was a gift from the publisher, celebrate lit bloggers and netgalley. A positive view was not required. All opinions expressed are my own.
Virginiaw More than 1 year ago
This had a slightly slower start for me than her other books but I was glad I kept reading. I wasn't sure for quite a while as to who Anna was going to really fall in love with. This had a few twists and turns toward the middle and the end and this really kept my interest. I look forward to book three in the series. I received a copy of this book from Celebratelit for a fair and honest opinion that I gave of my own free will.
MelissaF More than 1 year ago
Suzanne is a great author. She has written a very interesting story on so many levels. I have read several Amish books but none set when they have come to America. I enjoyed hearing about how they settled the land and the lessons they had to learn along the way. From the opening chapter you will wondering what is going on with Barin, where does his heart lie? Does he care enough about Anna to come back to her? And who is this newcomer, will he steal Anna’s heart? There is a lot of mystery surrounding the whole story and so many questions as you go. I did not read the first book in this series and still completely enjoyed and was able to follow this book. If you enjoy historical Amish fiction then I recommend this one. A copy of this book was given to me through The Celebrate Lit Team. All opinions are my own.
SouthernGalLovestoRead More than 1 year ago
A couple of years ago, Suzanne Woods Fisher penned Anna's Crossing, an awesome story based on some of the earliest days of Amish settlers in the United States. In response to her readers' thirst for more, she has continued the story of Anna, Bairn, and others in their early days in their new world. In The Newcomer, Suzanne weaves together some actual historical events and characters with details from her research and characters of her own imagination for a continuing look at early Amish life in Pennsylvania. As always, Suzanne brings characters to life with the joys, difficulties, and challenges of their lives. Not every person and every situation has a "happy-ever-after" ending, but they all have their fair share of adventure. From devout church members to risk-taking searchers, the characters struggle to find their places and deal with right and wrong in making life-changing decisions. In addition to the Amish history, Suzanne also brings in some history of another religious group from 18th-century Pennsylvania. Because of the time and setting of the book, this is quite different from most Amish fiction. For readers interested in the history behind the fiction, The Newcomer is a fascinating read that I highly recommend. Thanks to Celebrate Lit for providing a copy of this book and allowing me to participate in this tour. I was happy to share my thoughts about the story.
Lane_Hill_House More than 1 year ago
Friday, February 10, 2017 The Newcomer by Suzanne Woods Fisher, © 2017 Amish Beginnings series, Book 2 My Review: This story was so interesting about the settling of the Amish in the New World. Penn's Woods became a beginning... 1737 - the Charming Nancy After long weeks at sea, the small church group has arrived at Port Philadephia and met by their Amish bishop from home. They are more than ready to arrive at the settlement he has prepared in advance of their coming. The emigrants have crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the Charming Nancy from Germany to begin anew in this New World. Join Anna König and Bairn Bauer as their hopes for their future are bright. They have been close since their childhood. Another immigrant has arrived on a separate ship from Germany and chooses to join their settlement. Henrik Newman has plans and is quite charming in his deliverance. How far can a person go to be believed? Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them. Matthew 7:20 Adjusting to a new country and travel across the unknown terrain are consuming strength and exhaustion of whom to follow. With winter approaching, are they to till the soil or build family structures as their first priority? They have been crowded on their journey and now bundled together in one dwelling. This story is very well written and demonstrates what can be done when working together to achieve a satisfactory and desired end. They are not without turmoil and uncertainties as each day is met and decisions are to be made. There is a Cast of Characters and Glossary of Historical Terms in the front, and the story is followed by a glimpse sneak peek of Book 3, The Return, available this coming summer! One thing I especially liked was how the experience of one was able to help another. ***Thank you, Celebrate Lit for including me in the book tour for The Newcomer and sending a print copy. This review was written in my own words. No other compensation was received.***
jacksonmomLV More than 1 year ago
I eagerly reread Anna's Crossing to get ready for The Newcomer, and I'm glad I did. In both books, though I liked the blossoming romance between Bairn and Anna, the character that really caught my attention was young Felix. No matter the situation, on sea or dry land, he seems determined to learn as much as he can and get the most out of every opportunity. I liked his interactions with the (real) Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia. And he certainly solved Bairn's problem with his captain, Angus Berwick, in typical Felix-fashion! Another "person of interest" for me was Dorothea Bauer, wife of the difficult Bishop Jacob. She suffered so much, but really grew emotionally and spiritually after rescuing the Masts' motherless baby. From the Charming Nancy to the Ephrata Cloister, she really comes into her own. I was so happy to see her loyalty and perseverance rewarded. The one character I never quite trusted was the namesake of this book. Henrik Newman/Karl Neumann was just too slick for my liking, besides trying to come between Bairn and Anna. But I never thought he'd turn out quite like he did! This book is the middle volume in a series describing the coming of the Amish to the new world. Suzanne Woods Fisher does her usual thorough research, and weaves her fictional characters into a realistic setting peopled with historical names and details. She writes with urgency, yet takes time to develop her storyline. I really look forward to the conclusion of this series, but haven't let myself peek ahead into the teaser at the end of this book.