The Phantom Holocaust: Soviet Cinema and Jewish Catastrophe

The Phantom Holocaust: Soviet Cinema and Jewish Catastrophe

by Olga Gershenson

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780813561806
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Publication date: 07/15/2013
Series: Jewish Cultures of the World Series
Pages: 290
Sales rank: 886,099
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

OLGA GERSHENSON is an associate professor in the Judaic and Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the author of Gesher: Russian Theater in Israel and editor of Ladies and Gents: Public Toilets and Gender.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments — ix
1 Screening the Holocaust in the Soviet Union:
Jews without the Holocaust and the
Holocaust without the Jews — 1
2 Soviet Antifascist Films of the 1930s:
The Earliest Images of Nazi Anti-Semitism and
Concentration Camps on World Screens — 13
3 The First Phantom: I Will Live! (1942) — 29
4 How a Soviet Novel Turned into a Jewish Film:
The First Depiction of the Holocaust on Soviet
Screens, The Unvanquished (1945) — 40
5 The Holocaust on the Thawing Screens: From The Fate
of a Man (1959) to Ordinary Fascism (1965) — 57
6 The Holocaust at the Lithuanian Film Studio:
Gott mit Uns (1961) — 71
7 The Holocaust without the Jews:
Steps in the Night (1962) and Other Films — 82
8 Kalik versus Goskino: Goodbye, Boys! (1964/1966) — 91
9 Stalemate (1965) between the Filmmaker
and the Censors — 102
10 Kalik’s Last Phantom: King Matt and the
Old Doctor (1966) — 115
11 The Film That Cost a Career: Eastern Corridor (1966) — 127
12 Muslims Instead of Musslmans: Sons of
the Fatherland (1968) — 145
13 Commissar (1967/1988): The End of the Thaw — 158
14 An Alternative Track: Jewish Soldiers
Fighting on Soviet Screens — 173
15 The Last Phantom—the First Film:
Our Father (1966/1990) — 190
viii Contents
16 Perestroika and Beyond: Old Wine in New Bottles? — 206
17 Conclusions — 223
Abbreviations and Acronyms — 229
Notes — 231
Index — 269

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