The Vegetarian

The Vegetarian

by Han Kang

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101906118
Publisher: Crown/Archetype
Publication date: 08/23/2016
Pages: 208
Sales rank: 41,279
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.60(d)

About the Author

Han Kang was born in 1970 in South Korea. In 1993 she made her literary debut as a poet, and was first published as novelist in 1994. A participant of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, Han has won the Man Booker International Prize, the Yi Sang Literary Prize, the Today's Young Artist Award, and the Manhae Literary Prize. She currently works as a professor in the Department of Creative Writing at the Seoul Institute of the Arts.

www.writerhankang.com


From the Hardcover edition.

Read an Excerpt

***This excerpt is from an advance uncorrected proof***

Copyright © 2015 Han Kang

1

The Vegetarian

Before my wife turned vegetarian, I’d always thought of her as completely unremarkable in every way. To be frank, the first time I met her I wasn’t even attracted to her. Middling height; bobbed hair neither long nor short; jaundiced, sickly-looking skin; somewhat prominent cheekbones; her timid, sallow aspect told me all I needed to know. As she came up to the table where I was waiting, I couldn’t help but notice her shoes – the plainest black shoes imaginable. And that walk of hers – neither fast nor slow, striding nor mincing.

However, if there wasn’t any special attraction, nor did any particular drawbacks present themselves, and therefore there was no reason for the two of us not to get married. The passive personality of this woman in whom I could detect neither freshness nor charm, or anything especially refined, suited me down to the ground. There was no need to affect intellectual leanings in order to win her over, or to worry that she might be comparing me to the preening men who pose in fashion catalogues, and she didn’t get worked up if I happened to be late for one of our meetings. The paunch that started appearing in my mid-twenties, my skinny legs and forearms that steadfastly refused to bulk up in spite of my best efforts, the inferiority complex I used to have about the size of my penis – I could rest assured that I wouldn’t have to fret about such things on her account.

I’ve always inclined towards the middle course in life. At school I chose to boss around those who were two or three years my junior, and with whom I could act the ringleader, rather than take my chances with those my own age, and later I chose which college to apply to based on my chances of obtaining a scholarship large enough for my needs. Ultimately, I settled for a job where I would be provided with a decent monthly salary in return for diligently carrying out my allotted tasks, at a company whose small size meant they would value my unremarkable skills. And so it was only natural that I would marry the most run-of-the-mill woman in the world. As for women who were pretty, intelligent, strikingly sensual, the daughters of rich families – they would only ever have served to disrupt my carefully ordered existence.

In keeping with my expectations, she made for a completely ordinary wife who went about things without any distasteful frivolousness. Every morning she got up at six a.m. to prepare rice and soup, and usually a bit of fish. From adolescence she’d contributed to her family’s income through the odd bit of part-time work. She ended up with a job as an assistant instructor at the computer graphics college she’d attended for a year, and was subcontracted by a manhwa publisher to work on the words for their speech bubbles, which she could do from home.

She was a woman of few words. It was rare for her to demand anything of me, and however late I was in getting home she never took it upon herself to kick up a fuss. Even when our days off happened to coincide, it wouldn’t occur to her to suggest we go out somewhere together. While I idled the afternoon away, TV remote in hand, she would shut herself up in her room. More than likely she would spend the time reading, which was practically her only hobby. For some unfathomable reason, reading was something she was able to really immerse herself in – reading books that looked so dull I couldn’t even bring myself to so much as take a look inside the covers. Only at mealtimes would she open the door and silently emerge to prepare the food. To be sure, that kind of wife, and that kind of lifestyle, did mean that I was unlikely to find my days particularly stimulating. On the other hand, if I’d had one of those wives whose phones ring on and off all day long with calls from friends or co-workers, or whose nagging periodically leads to screaming rows with their husbands, I would have been grateful when she finally wore herself out.

The only respect in which my wife was at all unusual was that she didn’t like wearing a bra. When I was a young man barely out of adolescence, and my wife and I were dating, I happened to put my hand on her back only to find that I couldn’t feel a bra strap under her sweater, and when I realized what this meant I became quite aroused. In order to judge whether she might possibly have been trying to tell me something, I spent a minute or two looking at her through new eyes, studying her attitude. The outcome of my studies was that she wasn’t, in fact, trying to send any kind of signal. So if not, was it laziness, or just a sheer lack of concern? I couldn’t get my head round it. It wasn’t even as though she had shapely breasts which might suit the ‘no-bra look’. I would have preferred her to go around wearing one that was thickly padded, so that I could save face in front of my acquaintances.

Even in the summer, when I managed to persuade her to wear one for a while, she’d have it unhooked barely a minute after leaving the house. The undone hook would be clearly visible under her thin, light-coloured tops, but she wasn’t remotely concerned. I tried reproaching her, lecturing her to layer up with a vest instead of a bra in that sultry heat. She tried to justify herself by saying that she couldn’t stand wearing a bra because of the way it squeezed her breasts, and that I’d never worn one myself so I couldn’t understand how constricting it felt. Nevertheless, considering I knew for a fact that there were plenty of other women who, unlike her, didn’t have anything particularly against bras, I began to have doubts about this hypersensitivity of hers.

In all other respects, the course of our our married life ran smoothly. We were approaching the five-year mark, and since we were never madly in love to begin with we were able to avoid falling into that stage of weariness and boredom that can otherwise turn married life into a trial. The only thing was, because we’d decided to put off trying for children until we’d managed to secure a place of our own, which had only happened last autumn, I sometimes wondered whether I would ever get to hear the reassuring sound of a child gurgling ‘dada’, and meaning me. Until a certain day last February, when I came across my wife standing in the kitchen at day-break in just her nightclothes, I had never considered the possibility that our life together might undergo such an appalling change.

 

‘What are you doing standing there?’

I’d been about to switch on the bathroom light when I was brought up short. It was around four in the morning, and I’d woken up with a raging thirst from the bottle and a half of soju I’d had with dinner, which also meant I was taking longer to come to my senses than usual.

‘Hello? I asked what you’re doing?’

It was cold enough as it was, but the sight of my wife was even more chilling. Any lingering alcohol-induced drowsiness swiftly passed. She was standing, motionless, in front of the fridge. Her face was submerged in the darkness so I couldn’t make out her expression, but the potential options all filled me with fear. Her thick, naturally black hair was fluffed up, dishevelled, and she was wearing her usual white ankle-length nightdress.

On such a night, my wife would ordinarily have hurriedly slipped on a cardigan and searched for her towelling slippers. How long might she have been standing there like that – barefoot, in thin summer nightwear, ramrod straight as though perfectly oblivious to my repeated interrogation? Her face was turned away from me, and she was standing there so unnaturally still it was almost as if she were some kind of ghost, silently standing its ground.

What was going on? If she couldn’t hear me then perhaps that meant she was sleepwalking.

I went towards her, craning my neck to try and get a look at her face.

‘Why are you standing there like that? What’s going on . . .’

When I put my hand on her shoulder I was surprised by her complete lack of reaction. I had no doubt that I was in my right mind and all this was really happening; I had been fully conscious of everything I had done since emerging from the living room, asking her what she was doing, and moving towards her. She was the one standing there completely unresponsive, as though lost in her own world. It was like those rare occasions when, absorbed in a late-night TV drama, she’d failed to notice me arriving home. But what could there be to absorb her attention in the pale gleam of the fridge’s white door, in the pitch-black kitchen at four in the morning?

‘Hey!’

Her profile swam towards me out of the darkness. I took in her eyes, bright but not feverish, as her lips slowly parted.

‘. . . I had a dream.’

Her voice was surprisingly clear.

‘A dream? What the hell are you talking about? Do you know what time it is?’

She turned so that her body was facing me, then slowly walked off through the open door into the living room. As she entered the room she stretched out her foot and calmly pushed the door to. I was left alone in the dark kitchen, looking helplessly on as her retreating figure was swallowed up through the door.

I turned on the bathroom light and went in. The cold snap had continued for several days now, consistently hovering around -10°C. I’d showered only a few hours ago, so my plastic shower slippers were still cold and damp. The loneliness of this cruel season began to make itself felt, seeping from the black opening of the ventilation fan above the bath, leaching out of the white tiles covering the floor and walls.

When I went back into the living room my wife was lying down, her legs curled up to her chest, the silence so weighted I might as well have been alone in the room. Of course, this was just my fancy. If I stood perfectly still, held my breath and strained to listen, I was able to hear the faintest sound of breathing coming from where she lay. Yet it didn’t sound like the deep, regular breathing of someone who has fallen asleep. I could have reached out to her, and my hand would have encountered her warm skin. But for some reason I found myself unable to touch her. I didn’t even want to reach out to her with words.

 

For the few moments immediately after I opened my eyes the next morning, when reality had yet to assume its usual concreteness, I lay with the quilt wrapped about me, absent-mindedly assessing the quality of the winter sunshine as it filtered into the room through the white curtain. In the middle of this fit of abstraction I happened to glance at the wall clock and jumped up the instant I saw the time, kicked the door open and hurried out of the room. My wife was in front of the fridge.

‘Are you crazy? Why didn’t you wake me up? What time is . . .’

Something squashed under my foot, stopping me in mid-sentence. I couldn’t believe my eyes.

She was crouching, still wearing her nightclothes, her dishevelled, tangled hair a shapeless mass around her face. Around her, the kitchen floor was covered with plastic bags and airtight containers, scattered all over so that there was nowhere I could put my feet without treading on them. Beef for shabu-shabu, belly pork, two sides of black beef shin, some squid in a vacuum-packed bag, sliced eel that my mother-in-law had sent us from the countryside ages ago, dried croaker tied with yellow string, unopened packs of frozen dumplings and endless bundles of unidentified stuff dragged from the depths of the fridge. There was a rustling sound; my wife was busy putting the things around her one by one into black rubbish bags. Eventually I lost control.

‘What the hell are you up to now?’ I shouted.

She kept on putting the parcels of meat into the rubbish bags, seemingly no more aware of my existence than she had been last night. Beef and pork, pieces of chicken, at least 200,000-won worth of saltwater eel.

‘Have you lost your mind? Why on earth are you throwing all this stuff out?’

I hurriedly stumbled my way through the plastic bags and grabbed her wrist, trying to prise the bags from her grip. Stunned to find her fiercely tugging back against me, I almost faltered for a moment, but my outrage soon gave me the strength to overpower her. Massaging her reddened wrist, she spoke in the same ordinary, calm tone of voice she’d used before.

‘I had a dream.’

Those words again. Her expression as she looked at me was perfectly composed. Just then my mobile rang.

‘Damn it!’

I started to fumble through the pockets of my coat, which I’d tossed onto the living room sofa the previous evening. Finally, in the last inside pocket, my fingers closed around my recalcitrant phone.

‘I’m sorry. Something’s come up, an urgent family matter, so . . . I’m very sorry. I’ll be there as quickly as possible. No, I’m going to leave right now. It’s just . . . no, I couldn’t possibly have you do that. Please wait just a little longer. I’m very sorry. Yes, I really can’t talk right now . . .’

I flipped my phone shut and dashed into the bathroom, where I shaved so hurriedly that I cut myself in two places.

‘Haven’t you even ironed my white shirt?’

There was no answer. I splashed water on myself and rummaged in the laundry basket, searching for yesterday’s shirt. Luckily it wasn’t too creased. Not once did my wife bother to peer out from the kitchen in the time it took me to get ready, slinging my tie round my neck like a scarf, pulling on my socks, and getting my notebook and wallet together. In the five years we’d been married this was the first time I’d had to go to work without her handing me my things and seeing me off.

‘You’re insane! You’ve completely lost it.’

I crammed my feet into my recently purchased shoes, which were too narrow and pinched uncomfortably, threw open the front door and ran out. I checked whether the lift was going to go all the way up to the top floor, and then dashed down three flights of stairs. Only once I’d managed to jump on the underground train as it was just about to leave did I have time to take in my appearance, reflected in the dark carriage window. I ran my fingers through my hair, did up my tie, and attempted to smooth out the creases in my shirt. My wife’s unnaturally serene face, her incongruously firm voice, surfaced in my mind.

I had a dream – she’d said that twice now. Beyond the window, in the dark tunnel, her face flitted by – her face, but unfamiliar, as though I was seeing it for the first time. However, as I had thirty minutes in which to concoct an excuse for my client that would justify my lateness, as well as putting together a draft proposal for today’s meeting, there was no time for mulling over the strange behaviour of my even-stranger wife. Having said that, I told myself that somehow or other I had to leave the office early today (never mind that in the several months since I’d switched to my new position there hadn’t been a single day where I’d got off before midnight), and steeled myself for a confrontation.

 

Dark woods. No people. The sharp-pointed leaves on the trees, my torn feet. This place, almost remembered, but I’m lost now. Frightened. Cold. Across the frozen ravine, a red barn-like building. Straw matting flapping limp across the door. Roll it up and I’m inside, it’s inside. A long bamboo stick strung with great blood-red gashes of meat, blood still dripping down. Try to push past but the meat, there’s no end to the meat, and no exit. Blood in my mouth, blood-soaked clothes sucked onto my skin.

Somehow a way out. Running, running through the valley, then suddenly the woods open out. Trees thick with leaves, springtime’s green light. Families picnicking, little children running about, and that smell, that delicious smell. Almost painfully vivid. The babbling stream, people spreading out rush mats to sit on, snacking on kimbap. Barbecuing meat, the sounds of singing and happy laughter.

But the fear. My clothes still wet with blood. Hide, hide behind the trees. Crouch down, don’t let anybody see. My bloody hands. My bloody mouth. In that barn, what had I done? Pushed that red raw mass into my mouth, felt it squish against my gums, the roof of my mouth, slick with crimson blood.

Chewing on something that felt so real, but couldn’t have been, it couldn’t. My face, the look in my eyes . . . my face, undoubtedly, but never seen before. Or no, not mine, but so familiar. . . nothing makes sense. Familiar and yet not . . . that vivid, strange, horribly uncanny feeling.

 

On the dining table my wife had laid out lettuce and soybean paste, plain seaweed soup without the usual beef or clams, and kimchi.

‘What the hell? So all because of some ridiculous dream, you’ve gone and chucked out all the meat? Worth how much?’

I got up from my chair and opened the freezer. It was practically empty – nothing but miso powder, chilli powder, frozen fresh chillies, and a pack of minced garlic.

‘Just make me some fried eggs. I’m really tired today. I didn’t even get to have a proper lunch.’

‘I threw the eggs out as well.’

What?

‘And I’ve given up milk too.’

‘This is unbelievable. You’re telling me not to eat meat?’

‘I couldn’t let those things stay in the fridge. It wouldn’t be right.’

How on earth could she be so self-centred? I stared at her lowered eyes, her expression of cool self-possession. The very idea that there should be this other side to her, one where she selfishly did as she pleased, was astonishing. Who would have thought she could be so unreasonable?

‘So you’re saying that from now on, there’ll be no meat in this house?’

‘Well, after all, you usually only eat breakfast at home. And I suppose you often have meat with your lunch and dinner, so . . . it’s not as if you’ll die if you go without meat just for one meal.’

Her reply was so methodical, it was as if she thought that this ridiculous decision of hers was something completely rational and appropriate.

‘Oh good, so that’s me sorted then. And what about you? You’re claiming that you’re not going to eat meat at all from now on?’ She nodded. ‘Oh, really? Until when?

‘I suppose . . . forever.’

I was lost for words, though at the same time I was aware that choosing a vegetarian diet wasn’t quite so rare as it had been in the past. People turn vegetarian for all sorts of reasons: to try and alter their genetic predisposition towards certain allergies, for example, or else because it’s seen as more environmentally friendly not to eat meat. Of course, Buddhist priests who have taken certain vows are morally obliged not to participate in the destruction of life, but surely not even impressionable young girls take it quite that far. As far as I was concerned, the only reasonable grounds for altering one’s eating habits were the desire to lose weight, an attempt to alleviate certain physical ailments, being possessed by an evil spirit, or having your sleep disturbed by indigestion. In any other case, it was nothing but sheer obstinacy for a wife to go against her husband’s wishes as mine had done.

If you’d said that my wife had always been faintly nauseated by meat, then I could have understood it, but in reality it was quite the opposite – ever since we’d got married she had proved herself a more than competent cook, and I’d always been impressed by her way with food. Tongs in one hand and a large pair of scissors in the other, she’d flipped rib meat in a sizzling pan whilst snipping it into bite-sized pieces, her movements deft and practised. Her fragrant, caramelised deep-fried belly pork was achieved by marinating the meat in minced ginger and glutinous starch syrup. Her signature dish had been wafer-thin slices of beef seasoned with black pepper and sesame oil, then coated with sticky rice powder as generously as you would with rice cakes or pancakes, and dipped in bubbling shabu-shabu broth. She’d made bibimbap with bean sprouts, minced beef, and pre-soaked rice stir-fried in sesame oil. There had also been a thick chicken and duck soup with large chunks of potato, and a spicy broth packed full of tender clams and mussels, of which I could happily polish off three helpings in a single sitting.

What I was presented with now was a sorry excuse for a meal. Her chair pulled back at an angle, my wife spooned up some seaweed soup, which was quite clearly going to taste of water and nothing else. She balanced rice and soybean paste on a lettuce leaf, then bundled the wrap into her mouth and chewed it slowly.

I just couldn’t understand her. Only then did I realize: I really didn’t have a clue when it came to this woman.

‘Not eating?’ she asked absent-mindedly, for all the world like some middle-aged woman addressing her grown-up son. I sat in silence, steadfastly uninterested in this poor excuse for a meal, crunching on kimchi for what felt like an age.

Interviews

Barnes & Noble Review Interview with Han Kang

Han Kang's visceral and hypnotic novel, The Vegetarian, is so convincing that the translator, Deborah Smith, confessed to the author that she became a vegan after she finished. Han herself had been a vegetarian at one time but has since gone back to eating meat for health reasons. The Vegetarian is the American debut for the prolific South Korean writer, who grew up surrounded by books. Her father, Han Seung-won, is a novelist. She is the author of six novels, three short story collections, and one poetry collection.

Han read books for pleasure as a child, but when she was fourteen, she had a deeper purpose: attempting to understand life and death. "Suddenly I found out that literary works don't contain answers, only questions," she told me in an exchange via email. "The writers were weak and vulnerable [too]." So she wrote, and continues to write, as a way of questioning.

When she was still a teenager, Han read a short story called "Sapyung Station" by the Korean writer Lim Chul-woo. "I noticed with surprise that the story is driven not by a specific protagonist, but by the darkness of the deep night and the snow, the small, cold train station in the countryside, and the light of its stove burning sawdust — that life itself could become the main character and flow with its own inner rhythm." What flows through The Vegetarian is an urgent need to detach oneself from the constraints of the human body, to transform and possibly transcend its limits completely. The novel is split into what Han calls three novellas and tells the story of a woman named Yeong-hye through her husband, her brother-in-law, and her sister, In-hye. Yeong-hye's voice only comes across in descriptions of her terrifying dreams, "a palimpsest of horror" that turns her life into a phantasmagoric state. But it's physical, too. There's a lump in her chest: "The lives of the animals I ate have all lodged there. Blood and flesh, all those butchered bodies are scattered in every nook and cranny, and though the physical remnants were excreted, their lives still stick stubbornly to my insides."

Yeong-hye denounces meat, and gradually her control over her own body becomes so extreme that she thinks of herself as a plant, wanting to live off photosynthesis. She likes to be naked so she can absorb light.

"She refuses to eat meat to cast human brutality out of herself," Han says. "I think that, in this violent world, hers is an extremely awakened state, a horribly true and sane state."

Her brother-in-law, a stalled artist, becomes fixated on her once he finds out that she has a birthmark of the kind sometimes called a "Mongolian mark."

"Its pale blue-green resembled that of a faint bruise," Han writes, "but it was clearly a Mongolian mark. It called to mind something ancient, something pre-evolutionary, or else perhaps a mark of photosynthesis, and he realized to his surprise that there was nothing at all sexual about it; it was more vegetal than sexual."

Art is a major theme throughout the book; the brother-in-law paints bright flowers on Yeong-hye's body because he views her as something like a muse, and he wants to record her for a video — erotic or pornographic, depending on your point of view: "She might well be called ugly in comparison with his wife, but to him she radiated energy, like a tree that grows in the wilderness, denuded and solitary."

Han is drawn to gallery shows and exhibitions, and in some ways, The Vegetarian feels like an exhibit. Here is the female body on display for someone to misinterpret (her husband), someone to desire (her brother-in-law), and someone to feel sympathy for her (her sister). "They are tenaciously failing to grasp the true face of Yeong-hye," Han says. It's her hope that readers can see Yeong-hye as she truly is, through three "contrary gazes."

"In a certain sense, you can say that this novel is a story of sisters," Han says. "And so I wrote [the third section] in the present tense to separate it from the two preceding sections, and tried to get closer to In-hye's suffering. But I absolutely didn't want to exaggerate that suffering; on the contrary, I wanted to constantly moderate it. Maintaining that disparity wasn't easy to do."

In-hye is left to deal with the ramifications of her husband's obsession and her sister's mental illness. According to Han, In- hye's perspective was the hardest to write, and also the most significant part of the novel. It's through her that we learn an essential truth: " 'It's your body,' In-hye said, 'you can treat it however you please. The only area where you're free to just do as you like. And even that doesn't turn out how you wanted.' "

From the very first sentence of the book, Yeong-hye is an object. "Before my wife turned vegetarian, I'd always thought of her as completely unremarkable in every way," Yeong-hye's husband says. He married her because he wanted to have an ordinary wife. Her decision not to eat meat leads to an unraveling and a transformation, but the more she asserts her independence, the more she endures. In a particularly brutal scene, her abusive father forces meat into her mouth, and she slashes her wrist with a fruit knife.

Through its multifaceted portrayal of Yeong-hye's arresting journey, The Vegetarian places the reader face to face with a set of contradictions: Are we consumed by our appetites, both of the flesh and of the mind, or do our appetites consume us? During one dream sequence, Yeong-hye asks, "Why am I changing like this? Why are my edges all sharpening — what am I going to gouge?" It's a hollowing-out of her inner rhythm as she shifts from societal expectations to her own.

"Humans are such complex, precarious and vulnerable beings," Han says. "It has been my long-lasting question about how humans can have such a broad spectrum stretching from the sublime to the horrific. I am a person who believes in human dignity, who wants to remember that whenever I have to face the difficult and painful questions about humanity." — Michele Filgate

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The Vegetarian 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Some of the subject matter was disturbing enough that I would not recommend the book.
smg5775 More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure what I feel about this book. It is three points of view about Yeong-hye (husband, brother-in-law, and sister.) I liked it but I have questions which will probably be answered or discussed in my book club. The first part I wanted to smack the husband upside the head because of how he dealt with Yeong-hye. I found the second part sensual and erotic. The third part as the sister tells her tale made me wonder why they didn't just let her go. This is not a book that easily can be forgotten.
TheBookishHobo More than 1 year ago
Wow. I’m not entirely sure words which would do this book justice have yet to be invented. I contemplated letting my thoughts bounce in my head a bit before tackling this review. But I’m so exhausted by it all. Having been thrown into a dark, beautiful pit, and having only just barely made it back to the top, I thought I should let it all out. Before the weight of it all pulled me back down. Where I would be lost forever. The Vegetarian is told from three different point of views. There are only three chapters. One for each view. Don’t be fooled by the title. Or the size of this book. It is so much more than the mere 188 pages that fill the blood red cover. So much more than the simple choice of eating meat or not. This book is about choices. And consequences. Nightmares and realities. About daring to be different. Losing yourself. Sacrificing yourself. To something bigger. It’s about how delicately all this sanity we hold onto is held together. Just one thread. Pull it out. Snip it. And it’s all unraveling. Is it better to appear whole, but empty on the inside? Or is there peace in letting go and drifting off into a inarticulable alternative dimension and realty? Life. Death. Sadness. Insanity. Happiness. Joy. Lust. What is any of it? This book is extremely dark. It deals with a lot of heavy topics, so if you are easily triggered, you may want to not even lightly caress this book, as something will seep into you. And stain you. Forever. I feel violated. Abused. Disturbed. Lost. And yet profoundly found. Grateful for the beautiful ugliness that encompassed my soul. This is by far one of the most amazing and bizarre and utterly exquisite books I have read. Fans of Haruki Murakami, I think, will fall in love with Han Kang. And vice versa. Read it. If you dare. FTC DISCLAIMER: This book was reviewed outside of the request of the publisher and/or author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
navidad_thelamour More than 1 year ago
Wow, what can I say about this one except “wow.” The Vegetarian by Han Kang was everything that we love about Korean and Japanese literature and art—and that’s exactly what this work was: art. Here you will find what we have come to know, to love and to expect from authors in this genre who write in this vein: the vibrancy, the subtle magical realism, the commanding usage of words and the elusive, sinister nature that is unique to these works—all embedded within an established culture of history and mores that has survived and developed for millennia longer than most others. The Vegetarian read with a delicious ominousness that was as subtle as a shadow, like a breath at your neck. It was that subtly that made the read so taunt and disquieting, and there was a strange, magical realism to it that almost read like Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 (no shock there, as they both seem to have been influenced by Kafka). As a work of short literary form (it’s under 200 pages), it was unusual, among other reasons, in that it was told from three different perspectives with almost no perspective from the novel’s subject, Yeong-hye. We see how her vegetarianism, which later leads into a kind of manic catatonia, affects first her callous and at times sexually abusive husband, then her brother-in-law who becomes completely enthralled with her sexually because of her Mongolian mark, and her sister who is the last one standing when Yeong-hye’s psyche begins to peel away. In addition to the serious topics that The Vegetarian brushed up against: the effect of cultural mores on women, body image, conformism, familial ties and abuse, and, of course, mental illness that ultimately culminated in a way that I could never reveal without spoiling it for you—this was also a tale family dysfunction. It was a tale of familial ties that were severed painfully, of violent confrontations and realizations, of physical and emotional starvation, and a parable about the woman, the vegetarian, at the center of it all. The Vegetarian was sensual, and it meandered toward its climax in a way that was both unsettling and prophetic. It was allegory elevated to the highest level of art, raised to the level of surrealism. The change in tenses and POVs worked well. And even this technique, this simple process of sentence-writing that we learn in grade school, was elevated: the tenses of sentences shifted noticeably, particularly the closer that it came to dénouement, a jolting but brilliant allusion to this decent into mental illness and personal violence, which added to the mystical element of this novel. Han Kang produced a work, his first to be seen here in the U.S., that was so unhinged, so mystifying, that at times it would slither from your grasp. I had to sit and reflect on several of the passages for a few minutes—not because they were ill-written, but because they were both profound and often just outside of my immediate mental grasp, and that was a wonderful thing. It was an effect that I look for in modern-day writing—that disquietingly ungraspable moment. The Vegetarian was unconventional. It broke away from the molds that we find ourselves encumbered in with typical fiction. Here you will not find the typical “rising action, climax, falling action” formula that we’ve become so... To read the full review, go to The Navi Review at www.thenavireview.com, view my "full review section on Goodreads, and/or follow the blog on Twitter @thenavireview
litpixie More than 1 year ago
My God this is a difficult book. It's about the story of a woman in her 20s who decides one day after having a dream to become a vegetarian and how her husband, brother - in - law and her sister are affected by her decision. The first section of the book, told from the husband's point of view is the most difficult section to read. And it is in this section that we get an understanding of what this young woman is going through. Understanding early on what is affecting this young woman we better understand the horror of her life. In the second section, perhaps the most beautiful one of the book, her brother - in - law, who is an artist, uses her to create a video piece. It involves painting flowers over her body and a male's body and then seeing the two come together. But it is during this project when she seems so happy, that she is put into a situation that puts her into a mental hospital. The third section is told from her sister's point of view. It's hard not to feel for the sister, care giving to a younger sister and a sick child, and not wanting to rest and care for herself. It's easy to imagine the sister may herself have a breakdown. If you read this book, buy two copies and hand one to a friend. You will find that you want to talk to someone after reading this book.
PnJbookreviews More than 1 year ago
*** I received an ARC for an honest review 02/11/2016*** My review of "The Vegetarian" by Han Kang - Hardback Edition for BFB When I read the description for this book I was thrilled! I could not wait to read such an interesting novel premise written and translated from the Korean culture. The beautiful, intricate art work of flowers and roots hidden in the shape of a woman combined with a bright red background makes the book a definite eye catcher, and was fantastically done. The Vegetarian starts simply enough. A woman, Yeong-hye, chooses to become a vegetarian and her family abhors her decision. The first part of the book is told by her husband. He explains that there is nothing really special with his wife, Yeong-hye. She is plain looking with neither long nor short hair. Her future husband felt no special attraction to her either before or after they were married. She became a completely ordinary wife, and their life was really nondescript. In the story line, it is a dream that changes her life. A dream so graphic and bloody that it turns her away from all meat and all animal products. For her husband, it’s not a plant based, vegetarian diet that she is living, but a plant-like life, grounded and rooted in the firmness of her resolution. The rest of her family becomes involved, demonstrating just how male dominated Korea's culture remains, and as one would predict, things spiral out of control. The second part is told by her brother-in-law and delves deeper into Yeong-hye's obsession with being a part of nature, and how . The final part is told by her sister, and gives subtle clues as to how things may have started for them all. Each section reflects a moment in time and a different look at Yeong-hye, where you have to really search to understand where you are in time, as well as how it is related to the story plot around it. Yeong-hye is the central character of the story line, however she tells very little of her own story, and mostly refuses to speak at all throughout the journey. This story invoked a lot of different emotions in me, and I still am haunted by some of the images that were so intricately detailed in the book.(**I don't want to give any spoilers away , however this book contains both images that could be triggering as well as tough for some readers**) You could make an argument that Yeong-hye is flat and one-dimensional, and perhaps that was the author wanted to leave her as, flat and overlooked. She does ever truly tell her story. We catch glimpses into her world through those around her, but the was she is portrayed through the eyes of the other characters in the story line. For me, this made some of the story disjointed, and made it a difficult to unravel each of their personal issues, prejudices, and obsessions that leaves you to imagine how she would make it through each time jump you are subjected to as the chapters changed. Overall, this was a very well done story that stays with you long after you finish. **Again no spoilers, however there is one scene that may be extremely tough on some readers, and even I who am rarely shocked, had to take a break and walk away from that powerful scene.** I would recommend this as a "you won't die if you miss it, however it's a great cultural experience that as a reader you get to be immersed in. ***Again, I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review of this publication*** Thanks for taking the time to read my review. May you find YOUR next adventure
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writing is brilliant but I can't take the he violence. No!