Think Twice (Rosato & Associates Series #11)

Think Twice (Rosato & Associates Series #11)

by Lisa Scottoline

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781250043740
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 01/28/2014
Series: Rosato & Associates Series , #11
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 138,004
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.40(d)

About the Author

Lisa Scottoline is a New York Times bestselling and Edgar Award—winning author of twenty novels. She has 30 million copies of her books in print in the United States, and she has been published in thirty-five countries. She has served as the president of the Mystery Writers of America, and her thrillers have been optioned for television and film. She also writes a weekly humor column with her daughter, Francesca Serritella, for The Philadelphia Inquirer, and those critically acclaimed stories have been adapted into a series of memoirs, the first of which is entitled Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog. She lives in the Philadelphia area with an array of disobedient pets.

Hometown:

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Date of Birth:

July 1, 1955

Place of Birth:

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Education:

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1976; J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1981

Read an Excerpt

Think Twice


By Lisa Scottoline

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2010 Lisa Scottoline
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4299-6133-2


CHAPTER 1

Bennie Rosato didn't have anything in common with her identical twin, except their DNA. They shared the same blue eyes, strong cheekbones, and full mouth, but whenever Bennie looked at Alice Connelly, all she could see were their differences. Tonight, Bennie had on a khaki suit, white shirt, and brown pumps, her lawyer uniform. Alice had on tight shorts with a low-cut black top, flaunting cleavage that Bennie didn't even know they had. She made a mental note to look down her shirt, after she got home.

Alice was making dinner and she opened the oven door, releasing the aroma of roasting chicken. "Finally, it's ready."

"Smells great."

"You sound surprised."

"Not at all." Bennie changed the subject. "I like your new house, it's great."

"Yeah, right." Alice turned, carving fork in hand. "Why are you being so condescending?"

"I'm not."

"You are, too. It'll look better when I move all my stuff in, and the rent is low, since the estate can't sell it. That's the only way I could afford it. I don't have your money."

Bennie let it go. "It's good that it came furnished."

"This crap? It's dead people furniture." Alice pushed back a smooth strand of hair, yet another difference between them. She blew-dry her hair straight, and her eyeliner was perfect. Bennie let her hair curl naturally and thought ChapStick was makeup.

She sipped her wine, feeling warm. There was no air-conditioning, and the kitchen was small and spare except for knobby wooden chairs and a dark wood table. A greenish glass fixture gave little light, and cracks zigzagged down the plaster like summer lightning. Still the cottage had a rustic charm, especially set in the rolling countryside of southeastern Pennsylvania, an hour or so outside of Philadelphia.

Alice plopped the chicken on the table, then sat down. "Don't panic, it's organic."

"You're eating healthy now, huh?"

"What do you mean? I always did. So, are you dating anybody?" Alice asked.

"No."

"How long's it been since you got laid?"

"Nice talk." Bennie bit into a potato, which tasted good. "If I remembered sex, I'd miss it."

"Whatever happened to that lawyer you lived with? What was his name again?"

"Grady Wells." Bennie felt a pang. She'd get over Grady, any decade now.

"So what happened?"

"Didn't work out." Bennie ate quickly. It had taken forever to get here from Philly, in rush-hour traffic. She wouldn't get home until midnight, which wasn't the way she wanted to end an exhausting week.

"Who'd you see after Grady?"

"Nobody serious."

"So he's the one that got away?"

Bennie kept her head down, hiding her expression. She couldn't understand how Alice always intuited so much about her. They'd never lived together, even as babies, though Alice claimed to have memories from the womb. Bennie couldn't even remember where she put her car keys.

"So, what's new in your life? Don't give me the official version. I read the website."

"Nothing but work. How about you?"

"I'm seeing a few nice guys, and I'm working out. I even joined a gym." Alice made a muscle of her slim arm. "See?"

"Good." Bennie had been an elite rower in her time, but she'd been too busy lately to exercise. "By the way, I hear great things about the job you're doing at PLG. Karen thinks you're terrific."

"Are you keeping tabs on me, now?"

"Of course not. I ran into her, at a benefit."

Alice arched an eyebrow. "Does she have to report to you just because you got me the job?"

"No, but if I see her, we talk. She knows me, like she knows most of the bar association. She has to, we all support the Public Law Group." Bennie felt a headache coming on. She'd lost a motion in court this morning, and it was turning out to be the high point of her day.

"So what did she say, exactly? She loves to gossip."

"It wasn't like that." Bennie sipped her wine, but it didn't help. "All she said was that they like you. They have you doing office administration, payroll, and personnel, in addition to the paralegal work."

"Not anymore. I quit."

"What?" Bennie said, blind-sided. "You quit PLG? When?"

"The other day. It wasn't for me, and the money sucked."

"But you have to start somewhere." Bennie couldn't hide her dismay. She'd stuck her neck out for Alice and now her friends at PLG would be left in the lurch. "They would have promoted you, in time."

"When, ten years?" Alice rolled her eyes. "The work was boring, and the people were so freaking annoying. I'd rather work with you, at Rosato & Associates."

Bennie's mouth went dry. She couldn't imagine Alice at her firm. "I don't need a paralegal."

"I can answer phones."

"I already have a receptionist."

"So fire her ass."

Bennie felt cranky. Maybe it was the headache, which was a doozy. "I like her. I would never do that to her."

"Not even for me? We're the only family we have."

"No." Bennie tried to keep a civil tongue. Being her sister's keeper was getting old. "I can't fire her. I won't."

"Okay, fine, then think outside the box. You need somebody to run the office, don't you?"

"I run the office."

Alice snorted. "If you ask me, you could use a hand with personnel. Those girls who work for you need a life lesson, especially the little one, Mary DiNunzio. Time for girlfriend to grow up."

"That's not true." Bennie wished she hadn't come. Her stomach felt queasy. Her appetite had vanished. She set down her fork. "DiNunzio's a good lawyer. She should make partner next month."

"Whatever, then I'll be your assistant. I'll take ninety grand, to start."

"Listen, I can't always be the solution to your problems." Bennie's head thundered. "I got you a job, and you quit it. If you want another job, go out and find one."

"Thanks, Mom." Alice smiled sourly. "The economy's in the toilet, if you haven't noticed."

"You should have thought of that before, and you'll find something, if you try. You went to college, and you have lots of ... abilities and, oh, my head...." Suddenly the kitchen whirled like spin art, and Bennie collapsed onto the table. Her face landed on the edge of her dirty plate, and her hand upset her water glass.

"Aww, got a headache?" Alice chuckled. "Too bad."

Bennie didn't know what was happening. She felt impossibly drunk. Her eyes wouldn't stay open.

"You're such a fool. You think I'd really want to work for you?"

Bennie tried to lift her head up, but couldn't. All her strength had left her body. Sound and colors swirled together.

"Give it up. It's over."

Bennie watched, helpless, as darkness descended.

CHAPTER 2

Bennie woke up, groggy. She opened her eyes but everything stayed pitch black. She didn't know where she was. She seemed to be lying down. Where was the kitchen? The house? Alice? She couldn't see anything. Was she asleep? She got up and slam!

"Ow!" she heard herself say, momentarily stunned. She slumped backwards, hitting the back of her head. On what? Where was she? Was she dreaming? Was she awake? One question chased the next in a crazy circle. It was so dark. If she was asleep, it was time to wake up.

She raised her hand and bam! Her fingers hit something hard, above her. She flashed on the dinner with Alice. That had happened, hadn't it? She hadn't dreamed it, had she? Her face had fallen onto the table, hitting her cheek.

Give it up. It's over.

Bennie tried to remember. Had she heard that? Had Alice said that? What the hell? Where was she? The only sound was her own breathing. She raised her arms, cautiously, and hit the thing on top of her. She felt along its surface with her fingertips. It was solid. Coarse. She pressed but it didn't move. She knocked it and heard a rap, like wood. It felt like a top.

A lid.

She didn't get it. She couldn't process it. Her arms were at an angle. The wood was less than a foot from her face. She flattened her arms against her sides. There was another surface under her fingertips, behind her. She spread her arms, running them along the surface behind her. More wood? She shifted her weight down, shimmying on her back. Her toes hit something. Her feet were bare, her shoes gone. She pointed her toes against whatever she had reached. It seemed like a bottom.

It's a box. Am I in a box?

She didn't understand. It couldn't be. She touched along her body from her neck to her knees. She had on her suit from work. Her skirt felt torn. Her knees hurt. There was wetness there. Blood? She told herself not to panic. The air felt close. She squinted against the darkness, but it was absolute.

She felt the lid. Her thoughts raced ahead of her fingers. The top was sealed. There was nothing inside the box. No air, food, water. No hole to breathe through. She forced herself to stay calm. She needed to understand what was going on. It wasn't a dream, it was real. She couldn't believe it and she could, both at once. Was she really in a box? Would Alice come get her out? Would anybody else?

A sense of dread crept over her. She hadn't told anybody at the office where she was going. It was Friday night, and the associates had scattered. DiNunzio had taken Judy Carrier home to her parents' for dinner. Anne Murphy was out of the country for summer vacation, as was Lou Jacobs, her firm's investigator. Bennie's best friend, Sam Freminet, was in Maui, and she wasn't close to anybody else. Nobody would realize that she was missing until Monday morning.

She exploded in panic, yelling and pounding the lid with both hands. It didn't budge. She kept pounding with all her might, breaking a sweat. The lid still didn't move. She felt the seams with shaking fingers. She couldn't tell how it was sealed. She didn't hear a nail or anything else give way.

She pushed and pounded, then started kicking, driving her bare toes into the lid. It didn't move but she kept going, powered by sheer terror, and in the next minute she heard herself screaming, even though the words shamed her.

"Please, Alice, help!"

CHAPTER 3

Alice dried the Pyrex dish and placed it where she'd found it in the cabinet, then folded the dishtowel over the handle of the oven, the way it had been. She went to the table, straightened the stack of paid bills, and squared the corners, as she had found them.

The name on the mail read Ms. Sally Cavanaugh, and Ms. Cavanaugh would never know that while she was in the Poconos, a random woman had entered her house through an unlocked window and served wine à la Rohypnol in her kitchen. That's what she got for broadcasting her vacation plans all over the local post office. Alice had taken a train from Philly to the little town, scoped it out until she found an empty house, then taken a cab here in the dark, so nobody would see her.

She went to the living room, sliding her cell phone from her shorts. She flipped it open with a thumb and pressed until she found the photo. She had hauled Cavanaugh's things up from the basement, put them back in the living room, and compared the scene with the photo to make sure it was all in order; family and Siamese cat photos on the end tables, quilted knitting bag next to the worn brown chair, bestselling novels stacked on the credenza.

She picked up her black cloth bag and Bennie's messenger bag, then locked the front door by pressing the button on its knob. She twisted the deadbolt to lock, slid up the screen on the window, then climbed onto the porch, closing the window behind her. It was already dark because it had taken her so long to get rid of Bennie. A yellow bug light shone by the door, but no one was around to see her anyway. A thick woods screened the house from view, and it was surrounded by horse pastures. The air was humid and smelled like horse manure. She hurried down the porch steps, her footfalls pounding on the wood. She wasn't sorry to leave the country.

She dug her hand into the messenger bag and found the keys to Bennie's maroon Lexus, glistening in the driveway. She hit the button on the fob, opened the door, and jumped inside. She twisted on the ignition, reversed out of the driveway, then drove onto the private dirt road, spraying dirt and stones. She followed the road as it wound through the woods, passing battered black mailboxes until she reached the main road, then the highway. The air-conditioning blasted cold, and her tank top was finally drying. She'd worked up a sweat dragging Bennie into the backseat.

She hit the gas and relaxed into the ride. Everything was going according to plan. She'd been working at PLG during the day, but started moonlighting with a side business of her own, managing two women who sold Xanax, Ambien, Vikes, and Oxys to housewives at a gym and an upscale boutique. She fell into it when she met her boyfriend Q, who ran a full-scale operation all over the Northeast. He supplied her, but he would've taken a cut if he knew how much she really charged. The ladies who lunch weren't driving their Land Rovers to 52nd and Diamond for their Lexapro. But last week, she'd taken one risk too many.

Men.

Bad boys were her weakness, and though she'd had a good thing going with Q, even the CEO gets boring after a while. She'd hooked up with one of Q's runners, Jimmy, and they had some fun for a few weeks, on the down. But when Jimmy didn't show up to meet her, two nights ago, she guessed what must've happened. Q was a badass and he wouldn't stop until he'd disappeared her, too. He had people everywhere, and if one of his crew ever got ahold of her, she'd beg them not to take her alive. Bottom line, she had to get away, so she decided to become her rich sister long enough to take her money and run. The scam shouldn't take more than a few days. Alice would have killed Bennie but she didn't want to see her face on a dead body, especially not in that horrible suit.

Who still shops at Brooks?

She hit the gas, feeling her pulse quicken as the car accelerated through the dark night, over open road. She stayed the speed limit, but it was killing her. She loved to go fast, she fed on the sensation. She always wanted faster, bigger, better, newer, harder. She moved on when she got bored or restless, she specialized in cutting her losses. Life wasn't a dress rehearsal after all, and Alice lived hers to the fullest. She couldn't help the way she was. It was all because of her childhood, which was too damn good.

She sped along, thinking of her parents, John and Vilna Connelly, proprietors of the Connelly Insurance Agency, in Vineland, New Jersey. They'd lived a small, quiet life, taking good care of her, giving her the requisite pink bedroom in their split-level, sending her to the local public school, and making sure she had all the right lessons, but she never loved them. She didn't feel connected to them at all, probably because she knew inside that she wasn't.

She had grown up feeling apart from them, even before she ever heard the word "adoption." She knew she didn't look like them; she was blond and they were both dark-haired, and she surpassed them in height as early as middle school. The biggest difference was temperament; she was big, loud, and wanted everything, and they were small, meek, and wanted nothing. But every time she had asked them if she was adopted, they'd denied it, and even now, she wasn't angry that they lied, just that they were so bad at it. And when they'd died together a few years ago, in a car accident with a drunk driver, she went to their funeral and could barely squeeze out a tear.

She reached into the messenger bag, fumbled around for a Kleenex, spit on it, and wiped off her makeup. Then she lowered the window to ruin her blow-dry, and by the time she got to Philly, her hair was as curly as Bennie's. She steered into her exclusive neighborhood in Fairmount, near her beloved Schuylkill River. The houses were colonial with painted shutters, and BMWs and SUVs lined the street. She pulled into a parking space, twisted on the interior light, and smiled at the reflection in the rearview mirror. She looked exactly like Bennie, at least from the neck up.

"Hi, I'm Bennie Rosato," she said, practicing in the quiet car. "Pleased to meet you, I'm Bennie. Bennie Rosato."

She cut the ignition, grabbed her cloth bag and Bennie's messenger bag, got out of the car, and chirped it locked. Two men walked past her, talking, and she kept her head down. She hoped she didn't run into any of Bennie's neighbors because her twin never dressed this good. She reached Bennie's house, a three-story brick rowhouse with shiny black shutters, climbed the front steps, and picked the key that said Schlage as the house key. It slid easily into the lock, and she opened the front door, went in, and let it close behind her. She felt for a light switch, flipped it on, and stopped dead. She had forgotten one thing. Bennie had a big dog.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Think Twice by Lisa Scottoline. Copyright © 2010 Lisa Scottoline. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

An Original Essay by the Author

On its surface, Think Twice is the story of an evil twin who takes over the life of a good twin, and the question is whether the good or evil twin will survive.

But that's only the surface.

And appearances can be deceiving.

Those of you who are in book clubs like to dig deeper, and I appreciate your reading me, so I'll take this opportunity to break the wall between us and tell you frankly what inspired this novel, because to me, the surface is only part of what's going on in Think Twice.

But first, some background.

Where did I get the idea for Think Twice?

Believe it or not, I got the original inspiration from my own life—a decade or so ago, when I learned I had a half sister. I didn't learn of her existence until I was an adult, and she was a daughter of my father's, who was put up for adoption at birth. Happily, she had a wonderful adoptive experience, but after the passing of her adoptive father, she came to find her birth father, a difficult journey for her, and one which I honor, so much. But it was difficult for me, too, because when she surfaced, my experience was profoundly odd. I thought I was the only daughter, but I wasn't. I thought I was the oldest daughter, but I wasn't. It reconfigured my family, and confused and bewildered me, for a time.

I felt found, when I didn't know I'd been lost.

And so, a lifelong experiment in nature verses nurture began, in my mind.

But let's be clear. My half sister is a wonderful person, and not the evil twin herein. On the contrary, she's really the good twin. She looks uncannily like me, down to the blue eyes we both got from our father, and I've come to know and love her. But I knew I'd have to write about my feelings, in a way.

You can't have this job and ignore an event like that, or you forfeit your laptop.

Though Think Twice stands alone, it is, in fact, the third of three novels that I began after I met my half sister. The first was Mistaken Identity and the second Dead Ringer, which together introduce Alice and her increasingly homicidal actions. And, yes, I always use my real emotions to inform my novels. All fiction writers aspire to write the truth, as paradoxical as that may sound. As Francis Ford Coppola says, "Nothing in my movies happened, but everything is true." And the psychological journey that Bennie Rosato takes over the arc of these three novels was informed by my own feelings and gives Think Twice its emotional truth and power.

Especially because I believe that characterization is the most important part of any novel, what better way to delve deeply into character than through the trope of a good and evil twin? To me, what's really happening in Think Twice is that after Alice does all those terrible things to Bennie, Bennie finds that evil that lurks inside her own heart. And the real question in the novel is not will Bennie survive her twin, but will Bennie survive herself? Can she overcome the darker impulses for revenge and even murder that are stirred up, or maybe instigated, by Alice and her misconduct? Can Bennie get herself back, after she strays so far across the line between good and evil?

The English majors among you—and I know you are there, God bless you—will know that any good-and-evil-twin story inherits a long, rich literary tradition, which even has roots in modern psychology. To be specific, I was thinking of Edgar Allan Poe and his story "William Wilson" when I first found out about my half sister and began to write about Bennie and Alice. If you haven't read Poe's stories, you should, and the one that haunted me was "William Wilson," and you'll see how it feeds into Think Twice.

Read on, as Poe would say.

"William Wilson" is the story of a schoolboy, and at the very outset, his identity is uncertain. In fact, Poe starts the story, "Let me call myself, for the present, William Wilson. The fair page now lying before me need not be sullied with my real appellation."

Think "Call me Ishmael," but more intriguing.

Poe reportedly had an obsession with the color white, but we won't go into the parallels between him and Melville here. Suffice it to say that what happens in "William Wilson" is as epic a battle as with any white whale, but in Poe's story, the nemesis is the hero himself.

In the story, William Wilson meets a classmate who looks exactly like him. The other boy has the same name and even the same birthday. (Actually, William specifies that their shared birthday is "the nineteenth of January," which is Poe's own birthday.) He's the same height, too. They even enter the school on the same day, "by mere accident." The only difference between them is that the other boy has some defect in his throat that prevents him from raising his voice "above a very low whisper." Bottom line, the other boy is the double, or twin, of William Wilson.

The boys start out as uneasy friends, then the double does everything to make himself more like William Wilson, except that he can't copy his voice completely. William says, "His cue, which was to perfect an imitation of myself, lay both in words and in actions; and most admirably did he play his part. My dress it was an easy matter to copy; my gait and general manner were, without difficulty, appropriated; in spite of his constitutional defect, even my voice did not escape him. My louder tones were, of course, unattempted, but then the key, it was identical; and his singular whisper, it grew the very echo of my own."

And interestingly, instead of the main character being the good one and the double being the bad one, in "William Wilson," the narrator is the bad one, and the double is the good one. It's so much more interesting, and bolder. Imagine Goofus and Gallant, with Goofus as the storyteller. Isn't he more fun to listen to than the goody-goody Gallant? Patricia Highsmith, the author of the Ripley series, and Jeff Lindsay, in the Dexter series, would make the same wise choice, though the first writer to do so may have been John Milton. In Paradise Lost, wasn't Satan more interesting than you-know-who?

But to stay on point, in William Wilson, the title character is witty, naughty, and an effete bully. He drinks too much, uses profanity, and cheats at cards. His double is nicer, kinder, and more considerate in every respect. In time, William Wilson comes to dislike, then hate his double. He leaves school to get away from him, then time passes and he goes to Eton, where one day, he invites "a small part of the most dissolute students" to his room for "a secret carousal." Bam! In walks his double, to spoil the fun. William Wilson says, "I grew perfectly sober in an instant."

The double is the buzzkill of the century.

William flees to Paris, his thoughts haunted by his doppelganger. He says, "again, and again, in secret communion with my own spirit, would I demand the questions ‘Who is he? whence came he? and what are his objects?' But no answer was there found." At war with itself, William's psyche begins to disintegrate. He generates into chronic gambling, drinking, and further debauchery until we see him at another card game, with an aristocratic "dupe" he plies with liquor, to cheat him more easily. Suddenly, the double reappears and blows William's cover, exposing his hidden cards when he says: "Please to examine, at your leisure, the inner linings of the cuff of his left sleeve, and the several little packages which may be found in the somewhat capacious pockets of his embroidered morning wrapper."

Busted.

William hurries to Rome, decompensating further, and during a ball at Carnival, his lecherous eye falls upon the beautiful wife of a duke. Out of the blue, the double appears, this time masked and caped, to thwart our hero's misdeed. The two fall into a swordfight, and. . . .

Well, I can't give away the surprise ending. But you can read excerpts from the story following this essay.

So why do I think this story is so great, and how does it speak to me and inform Think Twice? I think it's in the pull of its terrific premise, the doubling between William Wilson and his look-alike. While it's unclear whether William and his double are two halves of the same whole, or two separate people, the dramatic effect is the same. His fragmented or broken identity terrifies us at a profound level, and when it's the protagonist who's having an identity crisis, we're placed squarely in his very shaky shoes. So it's impossible to read "William Wilson" and not identify with William, feeling his anguish and his evil, both at once.

And the threat is so much greater when it comes from within, as in this story of psychological horror, than from without, as in a conventional ghost story. Poe knew that no monster is half as scary as the evil within us, and it's tempting to wonder if he "wrote what he knew," considering his own personal unhappiness and the fact that he assigned William Wilson his own birthday. Read that way, the story is poignant indeed.

Plus, Poe may not have invented the evil twin, but he certainly anticipated it, as well as exploiting the spookiness that comes from the fragmenting or doubling of the self, and the splintering of identity. Sigmund Freud would later explain its psychology in his seminal essays The Uncanny, written in 1919, but there's no doubt that the concept gives "William Wilson" its dramatic impact.

And the hold that doubling has on our collective psyche is underlined by its more recent examples in popular culture, from benign sitcoms like The Patty Duke Show to the comic book conflict of Superman and his evil flip side, Venom. Think, too, of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, where the man looks like your husband but he's not your husband. Or vice versa, in The Stepford Wives, when the terrified wife stumbles upon her own replica.

Robert Ludlum's Jason Bourne novels trade on the doubling concept, when our hero flashes back on a self he doesn't know, remember, or even recognize. Bourne's confusion about his own identity, and whether he is fundamentally good or evil echoes "William Wilson." And there's even a hint of identity duality, or a split self, in Stephen King's classic, The Shining, in which a frustrated writer takes a job as a hotel caretaker, loses his mind, and tries to kill his family. Not only is the caretaker a double of a previous caretaker, who had followed the same deranged path, but we see how easily good dad crosses the median to become evil dad, when a hotel and a blank page drive him crazy.

The blank page, I know well.

And the interesting thing is that, as an author, I've learned that the page is never really blank. The blank page is full of an author's life, experience, and even surprise sisters. It's all there, even before I sit down to write.

After you've read Think Twice, do take a second to see if you can find the similarities between my personal story, "William Wilson," and the novel. They're there.

Lurking.

And thanks again, for taking the time to read me.

I am honored, and very grateful.

Ideas for Bookclubs

I am a huge fan of book clubs because it means people are reading and discussing books. Mix that with wine and carbs, and you can't keep me away. I'm deeply grateful to all who read me, and especially honored when my book is chosen by a book club. I wanted an opportunity to say thank you to those who read me, which gave me the idea of a contest. Every year I hold a book club contest and the winning book club gets a visit from me and a night of fabulous food and good wine. To enter is easy: all you have to do is take a picture of your entire book club with each member holding a copy of my newest hardcover and send it to me by mail or e-mail. No book club is too small or too big. Don't belong to a book club? Start one. Just grab a loved one, a neighbor or friend, and send in your picture of you each holding my newest book. I look forward to coming to your town and wining and dining your group. For more details, just go to www.scottoline.com.

Tour time is my favorite time of year because I get to break out my fancy clothes and meet with interesting and fun readers around the country. The rest of the year I am a homebody, writing every day, but thrilled to be able to connect with readers through e-mail. I read all my e-mail, and answer as much as I can. So, drop me a line about books, families, pets, love, or whatever is on your mind at lisa@scottoline.com. For my latest book and tour information, special promotions, and updates you can sign up at www.scottoline.com for my newsletter.

Reading Group Questions

1. On the first page, we are told that Bennie and Alice, despite identical DNA, are polar opposites—but are they? Aside from appearance, in what ways are these women "twins"? What traits do they share?

2. Alice was given up for adoption and Bennie was raised by their mother. Who do you think had a better life? Why? What impact do you think this had on the person Alice has become? Do you think Alice uses this as justification for her horrible acts? Does Bennie owe Alice anything? Why or why not?

3. Think Twice asks the question: Is evil born or bred? How does the book explore the question, and how would you answer that question? Do you think there can be evil in a good person, and good in an evil person? Explain. When pushed to the limit, do you think we are all capable of evil? Talk about what might make you do something you would otherwise never do.

4. Both Alice and Bennie have a chance to kill one another, yet neither goes through with it. Why do you think that is?

5. What is the significance of Alice's decision to bury Bennie alive? Is it cruel torture, a flash of compassion, or simply an error in judgment? In what ways have they both "buried" each other over the years? Is this act metaphoric of something else?

6. If Valentina had not intervened, do you think Bennie would have shot and killed Alice? Would she have been justified? Would you have forgiven her? Is that the same question? In what way would killing Alice have led to Bennie's own destruction?

7. Why is it unsettling to imagine one has a doppelganger, a double, a second self walking the earth? If you found out that you had a twin you had never met, would you feel excited to embrace your long lost sibling, or would you feel threatened by this other you? What impact do you think it would have on your life and close relationships?

8. Mary DiNunzio has worked closely with Bennie for years, yet she was easily fooled by Alice. Why? Why was Mary so inclined to believe Alice's impersonation? Was she just distracted by her recent troubles with Anthony, or was she blinded by Bennie's new found admiration for her?

9. Speaking of her relationship trouble, what did you think about Mary's decision about the house? Did you agree or disagree? Why? Is Anthony old fashioned to want to be the main breadwinner in their relationship, or is that urge to provide in a man's nature? How are disparate salaries playing a role in today's relationships?

10. Is Valentina a real witch or a charlatan? Does she have superpowers or just a good gut instinct? Do you trust your instincts? Have you ever had an experience that led you to believe you might have a sixth sense?

Interviews

An Original Essay by the Author

On its surface, Think Twice is the story of an evil twin who takes over the life of a good twin, and the question is whether the good or evil twin will survive.

But that's only the surface.

And appearances can be deceiving.

Those of you who are in book clubs like to dig deeper, and I appreciate your reading me, so I'll take this opportunity to break the wall between us and tell you frankly what inspired this novel, because to me, the surface is only part of what's going on in Think Twice.

But first, some background.

Where did I get the idea for Think Twice?

Believe it or not, I got the original inspiration from my own life--a decade or so ago, when I learned I had a half sister. I didn't learn of her existence until I was an adult, and she was a daughter of my father's, who was put up for adoption at birth. Happily, she had a wonderful adoptive experience, but after the passing of her adoptive father, she came to find her birth father, a difficult journey for her, and one which I honor, so much. But it was difficult for me, too, because when she surfaced, my experience was profoundly odd. I thought I was the only daughter, but I wasn't. I thought I was the oldest daughter, but I wasn't. It reconfigured my family, and confused and bewildered me, for a time.

I felt found, when I didn't know I'd been lost.

And so, a lifelong experiment in nature verses nurture began, in my mind.

But let's be clear. My half sister is a wonderful person, and not the evil twin herein. On the contrary, she's really the good twin. She looks uncannily like me, down to the blue eyes we both got from our father, and I've come to know and love her. But I knew I'd have to write about my feelings, in a way.

You can't have this job and ignore an event like that, or you forfeit your laptop.

Though Think Twice stands alone, it is, in fact, the third of three novels that I began after I met my half sister. The first was Mistaken Identity and the second Dead Ringer, which together introduce Alice and her increasingly homicidal actions. And, yes, I always use my real emotions to inform my novels. All fiction writers aspire to write the truth, as paradoxical as that may sound. As Francis Ford Coppola says, "Nothing in my movies happened, but everything is true." And the psychological journey that Bennie Rosato takes over the arc of these three novels was informed by my own feelings and gives Think Twice its emotional truth and power.

Especially because I believe that characterization is the most important part of any novel, what better way to delve deeply into character than through the trope of a good and evil twin? To me, what's really happening in Think Twice is that after Alice does all those terrible things to Bennie, Bennie finds that evil that lurks inside her own heart. And the real question in the novel is not will Bennie survive her twin, but will Bennie survive herself? Can she overcome the darker impulses for revenge and even murder that are stirred up, or maybe instigated, by Alice and her misconduct? Can Bennie get herself back, after she strays so far across the line between good and evil?

The English majors among you--and I know you are there, God bless you--will know that any good-and-evil-twin story inherits a long, rich literary tradition, which even has roots in modern psychology. To be specific, I was thinking of Edgar Allan Poe and his story "William Wilson" when I first found out about my half sister and began to write about Bennie and Alice. If you haven't read Poe's stories, you should, and the one that haunted me was "William Wilson," and you'll see how it feeds into Think Twice.

Read on, as Poe would say.


"William Wilson" is the story of a schoolboy, and at the very outset, his identity is uncertain. In fact, Poe starts the story, "Let me call myself, for the present, William Wilson. The fair page now lying before me need not be sullied with my real appellation."

Think "Call me Ishmael," but more intriguing.

Poe reportedly had an obsession with the color white, but we won't go into the parallels between him and Melville here. Suffice it to say that what happens in "William Wilson" is as epic a battle as with any white whale, but in Poe's story, the nemesis is the hero himself.

In the story, William Wilson meets a classmate who looks exactly like him. The other boy has the same name and even the same birthday. (Actually, William specifies that their shared birthday is "the nineteenth of January," which is Poe's own birthday.) He's the same height, too. They even enter the school on the same day, "by mere accident." The only difference between them is that the other boy has some defect in his throat that prevents him from raising his voice "above a very low whisper." Bottom line, the other boy is the double, or twin, of William Wilson.

The boys start out as uneasy friends, then the double does everything to make himself more like William Wilson, except that he can't copy his voice completely. William says, "His cue, which was to perfect an imitation of myself, lay both in words and in actions; and most admirably did he play his part. My dress it was an easy matter to copy; my gait and general manner were, without difficulty, appropriated; in spite of his constitutional defect, even my voice did not escape him. My louder tones were, of course, unattempted, but then the key, it was identical; and his singular whisper, it grew the very echo of my own."

And interestingly, instead of the main character being the good one and the double being the bad one, in "William Wilson," the narrator is the bad one, and the double is the good one. It's so much more interesting, and bolder. Imagine Goofus and Gallant, with Goofus as the storyteller. Isn't he more fun to listen to than the goody-goody Gallant? Patricia Highsmith, the author of the Ripley series, and Jeff Lindsay, in the Dexter series, would make the same wise choice, though the first writer to do so may have been John Milton. In Paradise Lost, wasn't Satan more interesting than you-know-who?

But to stay on point, in William Wilson, the title character is witty, naughty, and an effete bully. He drinks too much, uses profanity, and cheats at cards. His double is nicer, kinder, and more considerate in every respect. In time, William Wilson comes to dislike, then hate his double. He leaves school to get away from him, then time passes and he goes to Eton, where one day, he invites "a small part of the most dissolute students" to his room for "a secret carousal." Bam! In walks his double, to spoil the fun. William Wilson says, "I grew perfectly sober in an instant."

The double is the buzzkill of the century.

William flees to Paris, his thoughts haunted by his doppelganger. He says, "again, and again, in secret communion with my own spirit, would I demand the questions 'Who is he? whence came he? and what are his objects?' But no answer was there found." At war with itself, William's psyche begins to disintegrate. He generates into chronic gambling, drinking, and further debauchery until we see him at another card game, with an aristocratic "dupe" he plies with liquor, to cheat him more easily. Suddenly, the double reappears and blows William's cover, exposing his hidden cards when he says: "Please to examine, at your leisure, the inner linings of the cuff of his left sleeve, and the several little packages which may be found in the somewhat capacious pockets of his embroidered morning wrapper."

Busted.

William hurries to Rome, decompensating further, and during a ball at Carnival, his lecherous eye falls upon the beautiful wife of a duke. Out of the blue, the double appears, this time masked and caped, to thwart our hero's misdeed. The two fall into a swordfight, and. . . .

Well, I can't give away the surprise ending. But you can read excerpts from the story following this essay.

So why do I think this story is so great, and how does it speak to me and inform Think Twice? I think it's in the pull of its terrific premise, the doubling between William Wilson and his look-alike. While it's unclear whether William and his double are two halves of the same whole, or two separate people, the dramatic effect is the same. His fragmented or broken identity terrifies us at a profound level, and when it's the protagonist who's having an identity crisis, we're placed squarely in his very shaky shoes. So it's impossible to read "William Wilson" and not identify with William, feeling his anguish and his evil, both at once.

And the threat is so much greater when it comes from within, as in this story of psychological horror, than from without, as in a conventional ghost story. Poe knew that no monster is half as scary as the evil within us, and it's tempting to wonder if he "wrote what he knew," considering his own personal unhappiness and the fact that he assigned William Wilson his own birthday. Read that way, the story is poignant indeed.

Plus, Poe may not have invented the evil twin, but he certainly anticipated it, as well as exploiting the spookiness that comes from the fragmenting or doubling of the self, and the splintering of identity. Sigmund Freud would later explain its psychology in his seminal essays The Uncanny, written in 1919, but there's no doubt that the concept gives "William Wilson" its dramatic impact.

And the hold that doubling has on our collective psyche is underlined by its more recent examples in popular culture, from benign sitcoms like The Patty Duke Show to the comic book conflict of Superman and his evil flip side, Venom. Think, too, of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, where the man looks like your husband but he's not your husband. Or vice versa, in The Stepford Wives, when the terrified wife stumbles upon her own replica.

Robert Ludlum's Jason Bourne novels trade on the doubling concept, when our hero flashes back on a self he doesn't know, remember, or even recognize. Bourne's confusion about his own identity, and whether he is fundamentally good or evil echoes "William Wilson." And there's even a hint of identity duality, or a split self, in Stephen King's classic, The Shining, in which a frustrated writer takes a job as a hotel caretaker, loses his mind, and tries to kill his family. Not only is the caretaker a double of a previous caretaker, who had followed the same deranged path, but we see how easily good dad crosses the median to become evil dad, when a hotel and a blank page drive him crazy.

The blank page, I know well.

And the interesting thing is that, as an author, I've learned that the page is never really blank. The blank page is full of an author's life, experience, and even surprise sisters. It's all there, even before I sit down to write.

After you've read Think Twice, do take a second to see if you can find the similarities between my personal story, "William Wilson," and the novel. They're there.

Lurking.

And thanks again, for taking the time to read me.

I am honored, and very grateful.

Ideas for Bookclubs

I am a huge fan of book clubs because it means people are reading and discussing books. Mix that with wine and carbs, and you can't keep me away. I'm deeply grateful to all who read me, and especially honored when my book is chosen by a book club. I wanted an opportunity to say thank you to those who read me, which gave me the idea of a contest. Every year I hold a book club contest and the winning book club gets a visit from me and a night of fabulous food and good wine. To enter is easy: all you have to do is take a picture of your entire book club with each member holding a copy of my newest hardcover and send it to me by mail or e-mail. No book club is too small or too big. Don't belong to a book club? Start one. Just grab a loved one, a neighbor or friend, and send in your picture of you each holding my newest book. I look forward to coming to your town and wining and dining your group. For more details, just go to www.scottoline.com.

Tour time is my favorite time of year because I get to break out my fancy clothes and meet with interesting and fun readers around the country. The rest of the year I am a homebody, writing every day, but thrilled to be able to connect with readers through e-mail. I read all my e-mail, and answer as much as I can. So, drop me a line about books, families, pets, love, or whatever is on your mind at lisa@scottoline.com. For my latest book and tour information, special promotions, and updates you can sign up at www.scottoline.com for my newsletter.

Customer Reviews

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Think Twice (Rosato and Associates Series #13) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 270 reviews.
Rena_A More than 1 year ago
Lisa Scottoline hooks you from the first page. I have read hundreds of books and this one is sincerely a page turner. The characters draw you in immediately. It forces you to acknowledge that there is evil and good in the world. It also makes you question how well your friends and boyfriend knows you. I have relatives who are identical twins and I believe we would be able to tell if one was impersonating the other. This book nags at you questioning, If need be could you prove you were you when someone has already took over and convinced your co-workers and friends. I did not expect the ending to be as it was. I wanted a more final ending but I guess this may lead to a sequel. This is a good read and a great book for thrill seekers.
LisaTortorello More than 1 year ago
I have read just about every book Lisa Scottoline has written and Think Twice is among her best yet! I love the physical set up of the book - shorter chapters with the focus of each chapter on a different character. Reading her book was certainly like watching a movie unfold. I enjoy Lisa's characterization too. My favorite character in this book was Fiorella Bucatina! Not only is that a great name, but Scottoline did wonders with her and the dialogue among the Italian family. We hear about people stealing identities today, but what if the person trying to be you looks exactly like you too. Friends and family can't tell the difference and no one will believe that you are the real you. In Think Twice, Bennie Rosato has to deal with her evil twin not only taking over her identity but trying to silence Bennie for good. It's certainly a mad rush to the finish-line in Lisa Scottoline's novel. The only thing you won't have to think twice about is turning the pages fast enough to see if good will conquer evil or if this time evil will finally win out. Lisa Tortorello- author of My Hero, My Ding
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I look forward to Lisa's new book every year. I was so excited that she was returning to Mary and Benny and Judy. I wasn't crazy about the plot line with Alice being able to take over Benny's life but I love the characters so much that it was still a great way to spend a couple of afternoons immersing myself in the lives of my favorite lady lawyers. Lisa is one of my absolute favorite authors and I'm already wishing she had another new book coming out next month. Lisa Scottoline fans may be slightly disappointed in this book but not enough to quit lining up to get her next book.
hannahprescott More than 1 year ago
If you don't have a twin.BE THANKFUL! This is a brilliant mix of ingredients for gut-wrenching suspense, Lisa Scottoline introduces her readers to Bennie Rosato and Alice Connolly, identical twins, in appearance only. In intense emotional layers, chilling controversy will grab you by the throat and heart throughout. They are identical twins separated at birth because their mother could not afford to keep them, but kept Bennie Rosato anyway and gave up Alice Connolly for adoption. They met as adults, by chance. Bennie Rosato looks exactly like her identical twin, Alice Connolly, but the darkness in Alice's soul makes them two very different women. The battle between good and evil is brought out all the way through the book and it will keep you laughing, crying, frowning, and never putting the book down!
ohmommafl More than 1 year ago
another scottoline mystery. Great story with the same characters I've come to know and love reading about! With the author's usual twists and turns that keep you guessing how it will end. Two thumbs up!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book two years ago for my independent novel. I randomly chose it because the synopsis seemed interesting, ive probably got to rate this as one of my top choices to read. Read it! Its worth it!
Carspar289 More than 1 year ago
Lisa Scottoline, what can I say? love her books, love her book signings. Great storylines everytime. Highly recommended and can't wait for her next great read!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I always look forward to reading Lisa Scottoline's next book about Bennie and her Philadelphia law firm. Think Twice was no exception, until I actually started reading...I did not find the book at all believable and it was not just the evil twin concept I had trouble with. Think Twice was not nearly as interesting or enjoyable as Scottoline's previous books. Usually I have trouble putting her books down; this time I had trouble trying to get to the ending. For those of us who are fans, I hope Lisa Scottoline continues to write the Bennie Rosato series, but I hope she goes back to writing the way she wrote prior to Think Twice.
harstan More than 1 year ago
They are identical twins separated at birth as their mom could not afford even one of them, but kept Bennie Rosato and gave up Alice Connolly for adoption. They met as adults (see dead Ringer) and now Bennie is at Alice's new rental home having dinner. Alice tells Bennie she quit her job as a paralegal at the Public Law Group in Philadelphia and asks her twin for a job at Rosato & Associates. Suddenly Bennie complains about a headache while hearing her sister mumble "Give it up. It's over." Bennie awakens to find herself inside a box with a bleeding knee and no food, water, or air hole. Unbeknownst to Bennie, Alice had not rented the house, but instead knew the owner Ms. Sally Cavanaugh was in the Pocono's so she took it over to serve her sister wine with Rophynol. Alice had to vanish because she cheated on her drug dealing boyfriend Q who will kill her so she became Bennie but could not murder her sister as the thought of looking at her own face on a corpse was nauseating so she buried her alive. Now she acts as Bennie to access her sister's wealth and Bennie's former boyfriend Grady. However, Bennie is coming with vengeance in her heart. In spite of wondering why Bennie failed to learn her lesson re Alice after Dead Ringer, fans will enjoy her latest adventures from the moment she realizes where she is trapped as Lisa Scottoline explores nurturing vs. naturing with the separated at birth twins. This fast-paced thriller has the audience wondering what will happen when benevolent Bennie catches up to malevolent Alice. Although the premise of a twin killing and taking over the identity of her sibling has been used before (see Bette Davis' movie Dead Ringer) and the escape from the coffin is exhilarating over the top of the Pocono's, Think Twice is a terrific character driven tale. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am sorry to say that I did not feel the writing of 'Think Twice' contained much depth. Once I started the book, I did want to finish the storyline. I typically find that in a well-written book, I am caught up in the characters and plot. In this book, I found that I just needed to find out what happened in the end.
CBH More than 1 year ago
The ever humorous and exciting character of Bennie Rosato is back in an adventure that could cost her life when her much kept-away-from twin sister, Alice Connelly, physically and mentally enters Bennie's life. Bennie is the head of a successful Philadelphia law firm that has many good lawyers, most of who are employees Bennie considers good friends, not just employees. The twins were separated when they were born because their parents couldn't raise one much less two children. When Bennie found out she had a twin sister and also discovered that Alice was a no good tramp, she avoided her at all costs. So when Alice showed up at Bennie's house, Bennie tried to get rid of her but thought she would give Alice a chance again. Wrong move! Before long, Alice had slipped Bennie a drug to knock her out and knock Bennie out it did. When Bennie started to come back to realization, she found herself in a confined space of some sort and could not move much at all and had NO air. She discovered the top of the box, or whatever it was, was made of wood. She clawed, scraped, kicked, threw her arms, legs, and whatever she could to move or get oxygen without much success. Then she heard strange sounds coming from above that sounded as though an animal was digging from the top trying to get to the "food" that was under that wood. Meanwhile, the completely different personality and life style twin sister was quickly learning how to become Bennie so she could obtain all of Bennie's money and live her life in such a better lifestyle than she always had. Alice was a slut so it took much changing and not just in appearance to run Bennie's law firm and how to learn how to treat all the employees. Mary DiNunzio was one of the firms' best lawyers and one of Bennies best friends. Mary and Bennie had discussed the possibility that she might become partner in the firm soon. Alice, acting as Bennie, took over Bennie's home, money, old boyfriend, and undertook her total takeover of Bennie's life but really entered a ton of problems when dealing with Bennie's family, Mary's family, and Judy Carrier and her family. Judy was a best buddy of Bennie and Mary. The Italian family was one Alice avoided when she could. When Bennie, all banged up and broken, finally escaped the box Alice had buried her in, the problems really began for Bennie. Alice had arranged to financially take over Bennie's life so she could have a rich life after she got away from all that knew her. Even the law authorities didn't know which twin was Bennie. There is much humor, love, disputes of all kinds, even some law (Bennie is a lawyer!) gets worked in with Alice being involved in cases she faintly knew about. The battle between right and evil is brought out in "Think Twice" all the way through the book and it will have you laughing, crying, moving your legs trying to run while reading, and never knowing what the next page will bring. An excellent story. Thanks Lisa. Keep them coming.
KatharineClifton on LibraryThing 4 days ago
I don't even know where to start. I suppose if I am to start by saying something good, then I should say that at least I only paid half price for the book. As for the things I didn't like...I think it best just to bullet-point them:- plot holes so large you could drive a truck through them- unlikeable characters- unbelievable characters- characters who act unlike any other human I've ever encountered, even imaginary ones- Bennie is described as a high-powered attorney, but I found her just as vapid and stupid as the people she surrounded herself with at work- I understand that she's a recurring character, but even her name bothered me- relationships and dialogue surrounding them that made me cringe- the idea that anyone, even someone who looked identical to the other person, could so completely assume someone's identity & fool (almost) everyone around her when she basically knew not a single thing about the person whose identity she was stealing- the flouting of banking laws and regulations, the flouting of TSA regulations ("you should let me fly because this FBI agent says I'm okay"), the flouting of basic laws of physics and human nature - want to be a partner in my law firm? Okay, you're a partner. Feel free to just change the name of the firm on the fly on the very day that I say you are a partner, before we file any paperwork to that effectTo wrap-up, I would not recommend this book. The only twist I found even remotely interesting involved the dog. I wish I could get back my money, and more importantly my time. Not sure why I flogged myself into finishing this one, probably should have just abandoned it less than halfway through. Though I guess that's another good point: it was definitely a quick read.
coolmama on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Quick paced (most chapters are 2-3 pages), action thriller/mystery about identical twins - Bennie a powerhouse lawyer and Alice-a psychopath out to get her--and what ensues. Totally predicable plot that you can guess by page 10. That said, it read fast, was fun, and was like watching a well made Lifetime Movie of the week.
philliesmama on LibraryThing 4 days ago
This was a book club selection and it probably produced one of our best discussions on how poorly written and implausible the story was... swimming across the Delaware to Camden ... get real! Buried alive, not... clueless boyfriend. oh well..
PegSwaney on LibraryThing 4 days ago
rennie's evil twin takes over her life after burying her in a box
mikedraper on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Bennie Rosato has an identical twin, Alice Connelly, who resents her. In a visit, Alice complains how hard things are for her. Bennie has helped her in the past and tells her to stop complaining and get a job.Alice gives Bennie something to make her pass out, then burries her in a small container.Alice takes ove Bennie's identity, going to her job and passing herself as Bennie, even sleeping with Bennie's boy friend.Bennie is a fighter and didn't know her determination until put in this position. She scratches and claws her way until she can get out, determined to take revenge on Alice and make her pay for what she did.Neither of the characters are likable and the story was too far fetched.
mountie9 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
The Good Stuff * Snappy dialogue * Exciting storyline, keeps you on the edge of your seat at times * Interesting characters * Fascinating premise * Good twists and turns and satisfying ending * Fiorella is a great characterThe Not so Good Stuff * Not very believable how quickly twin sister obtained all the access to her sisters financial records * The stuff about her digging out of her grave also wasn't really believable -- but than again not something I would really want to find out about. * For a Lawyer main character is too naiveFavorite Quotes/Passages"Everything was bought and paid for, and the girl was a saver, which explained her wardrobe""She had paralegal training, and she was a scam artist, which was a lawyer without the student loans""Sometimes it was hard to choose between best friend and boyfriend, and she should have gone with the ovaries.""When she saw how much of her mortgage payment went toward interest, she decided that the line between federal banking and organized crime was way too fine.""Maybe any one of us, pushed to the brink, is capable of evil."What I Learned * Lawyer's are kinda dumb sometimes * It is not always fun to have a twin * Stress can do strange things to youWho should/shouldn't read * Good for mystery and suspense lovers * Some violence and sex so not for the prudish3.5 Dewey's - Great Summer Read
bleached on LibraryThing 4 days ago
An interesting mystery where Bennie Rosato's evil twin sister tries to murder her, steal her identity, and make off with her money. After surviving Bennie has to face that fact that all of us have a bit of evil in us and has to decide if she will stoop to her sister's level to get revenge.A nail-biter of a mystery with loads of conflict and well narrated with views from different characters.
StanSki on LibraryThing 4 days ago
When I read the cover blurb, Bennie Roasato is burried alive by her evil twin sister, I thought how preposterous can this story be. But somehow, Scottoline brought this all together.I never would think about the possibilities of having an identical twin, and confusing the two of them. And, one good, one evil adds to the dichotomy of the situation. Scottoline keeps the suspense building, even when you think the situation is about the resolve itself.Not excellent literature, but a good read.
mawshimp on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Great addition to a wonderful series. I thoroughly enjoyed the twists - who knew what and when? Who could tell and who couldn't? Would she or wouldn't she kill? It'll mean a whole lot more to those who have read her books in the past so start with the first one ' Everywhere that Mary went'.
bratt67 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
I found this book very good, but with having read previous Lisa Scottoline books with the same characters, I did find the way Bennie handled the situation was a bit not like her. Other than that, it was well written, and most of the other characters were more in line from previous books.
pharrm on LibraryThing 4 days ago
Bennie twin takes over and tries to her life as her own.
sharon54220 on LibraryThing 4 days ago
This was the first book I read by Lisa Scottoline and I thoroghly enjoyed it. It was the type of book that once you start it you don't want to put it down. I highly recommend it.
spotteddog on LibraryThing 4 days ago
This was a quick, fun read. Lisa Scottoline never dissapoints! If you have not read any of her books, you really should start with her first one, as the same characters appear in each novel and it is important to the development of the characters to read them chronologically.
kraaivrouw on LibraryThing 4 days ago
This isn't the best of Lisa Scottoline's books, but isn't the worst, either. Mostly it feels a bit forced and slapdash, but the evil twin plot is always entertaining and she writes some funny characters and gives them some funny lines. Oddly, the best part of the book were the chapters where our heroine is buried alive and struggling to break free - truly claustrophobic and utterly believable descriptive writing that made me wonder if Ms. Scottoline had herself buried alive to see what it might feel like. Those chapters made my skin crawl. Other than that the book is mildly entertaining, but really just so-so.