Tishomingo Blues

Tishomingo Blues

by Elmore Leonard
4.3 23

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Overview

Tishomingo Blues by Elmore Leonard

“Leonard delivers a certifiable masterpiece of such twisted ingenuity that he transcends even his own bad self….Tishomingo Blues is that good.”

Baltimore Sun

 

Crime fiction Grand Master Elmore Leonard heads to the Deep South for a bracing dose of Tishomingo Blues—a wild, Leonard-esque ride featuring gamblers, mobsters, murderers, high divers, and Civil War re-enactors that the New York Times Book Review calls, “Leonard’s best work since Get Shorty.” Sparkling with trademark “Dutch” Leonard dialogue so sharp it could cut you, Tishomingo Blues is classic mystery, mayhem, and gritty noir fun from “the coolest, hottest thriller writer in America” (Chicago Tribune).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062009395
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 09/28/2010
Pages: 387
Sales rank: 449,473
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Elmore Leonard wrote more than forty books during his long career, including the bestsellers Raylan, Tishomingo Blues, Be Cool, Get Shorty, and Rum Punch, as well as the acclaimed collection When the Women Come Out to Dance, which was a New York Times Notable Book. Many of his books have been made into movies, including Get Shorty and Out of Sight. The short story "Fire in the Hole," and three books, including Raylan, were the basis for the FX hit show Justified. Leonard received the Lifetime Achievement Award from PEN USA and the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America. He died in 2013.

Hometown:

Bloomfield Village, Michigan

Date of Birth:

October 11, 1925

Place of Birth:

New Orleans, Louisiana

Education:

B.Ph., University of Detroit, 1950

Customer Reviews

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Tishomingo Blues 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tishomingo Blues is a tour de force for Mr. Elmore Leonard. All of the best elements that make his novels so powerful, interesting, and engrossing come together successfully here. Unlike many crime novels where the criminals are all uninteresting, disgusting, or worse, Mr. Leonard has peopled Tishomingo Blues with one of the most original criminals I have ever read about in Robert Taylor. As the primary narrator, you will be fascinated to follow the career of Dennis Lenahan, world champion high diver, who lives to leap faultlessly (or it¿s worth a trip to the hospital) into a tank that¿s only nine feet deep from a head height of 80 feet. Now, does the pool like a half-dollar . . . or like a tea cup from that height? You¿ll have to decide for yourself after reading the novel. Character development is quite extensive in this book, both in terms of the number of characters and how much you learn about them. The plot is unusually well designed so that interactions among the well-developed characters allow you to dive much deeper into understanding all of the characters. As usual, Mr. Leonard¿s dialogue is true to the ear, close to life, and delightfully spare. Even coarse words don¿t seem coarse in the hands of his master. In Mr. Leonard¿s best books, there¿s a comic element that points out the human comedy in ways you haven¿t thought about before. Here that humor is combined with a delightfully complicated plot that unfolds endlessly in front of you so that you don¿t quite know what will happen next. And the surprises are usually quite rewarding in terms of stimulating your funny bone, your sense of irony, and your imagination. As I read this book, I thought a lot about accidental events in my life that had an enormous role in developing my interests and skills. Where have you run into irresistible opportunities? Donald Mitchell, co-author of The 2,000 Percent Solution and The Irresistible Growth Enterprise
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Elmore Leonard does not disappoint in this crisply written book. Sit back and enjoy.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
Having read Road Dogs before this book, I know how good Leonard can be. This book isn't close. Some interesting characters and dialogue, but the plot is weak, and all the civil war enactment just a boring distraction.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I feel like a traitor for giving Elmore Leonard a mere three stars. He has a tremendous reputation, and I was a bit intimidated when I started to read this book. It was my first encounter with Leonard, and I was, alas, quite disappointed. It's not a massive novel, but I had the impression that it was populated by half the cast of a War and Peace. The characters confused me. I was forever leafing backward, trying to find out who was who. I loved the offbeat plot (the 'hero'(?) is a high diver of all things), but that same 'hero,' along with so many other characters, just don't jump off the page as well defined. Robert Taylor, the street-smart Detroiter, plays U.S. Grant in a Civil War reenactment, and that bit of casting is, again, a slice of delicious wackiness. The dialogue was good, but not great (Taylor's 'street' talk often didn't ring 'true' to me). Dennis, the high diver, just didn't seem to be a 'round' character in the E.M. Forster sense. Nor, ln fact, did anyone else. Dennis seems dim and confused most of the time (is that the point?) The conclusion of the story was challenging to say the least. It became a 'who's who' and 'where's who'? I couldn't keep track of things. All in all, too bad, really, because Leonard is most certainly an assured writer. I was simply not engrossed in the book. I read in bed every night, and I'm usually looking forward to continuing a story. Not so with this one. It didn't 'capture' me. Having said all this, I know I'm well in the minority stable. Leonard is celebrated everywhere. In Tishomingo, I could many flashes of the reasons why, but the book as a whole just didn't do it for me. Complicated plotting is one thing, obfuscating plotting is another. I'm now working on Leonard's The Hot Kid, and I find myself much more involved in the story. Who can explain a reader's negative reaction to a book that's loved by the masses? One of life's little mysteries.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Elmore Leonard is a witty, literary chef with a flare for cooking up Southern homespun stories about low life criminals. His brutal, often offensive humor is an acquired taste that leaves his fans starving for more. With Tishomingo Blues he satisfies the hunger with yet another wonderful tale about the redneck Dixie Mafia, a black con man and a touring high platform diver. His characters are rich in flavor and the plot is spicy. And if you're lucky enough to listen to Recorded Books' Frank Muller tell the tale...well...the recipe just doesn't get any better!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read two of his books and I'm still looking for the "great Elmore Leonard." Disappointed and done. This book never focuses on a crisp plot line. Too many secondary characters. At times you've got several lines of dialogue switching between characters and no attribuution. You can't tell even with rereading who's talking. Doesn't end clearly either. Denoument is a copout kind of like the Sopranos or Seinfeld. I won't read ten of these things to find one hidden gem. The digital conversion also is lousy.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wild ride! Elmore Leonard introduces some of the quirkiest characters that you'll ever come across. The book would have earned a fifth star from me if he would have delved even more into the backgrounds of these crazy folks. A traveling high dive artist gets hooked up with a yankee con man in the South and lands smack dab in the middle of a Civil War reenactment that pits a northern godfather wannabe against the Dixie Mafia. The sidekick thugs on both sides of this battle will keep you shaking your head in disbelief. Nothing to be taken seriously. You'll have fun with it!---Robert John Estko, author of the suspense thriller EVIL, BE GONE.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book, but I didn't get as much out of it as someone who enjoys civil war reenactments. It is leonard doing what he does best, crafting an entertaining story with interesting and desperate characters. I personally like 'pagan babies' more, but I am a Yankee and have little interest in american history. He did seem a little predictable in this book, though. He seems to have developed a plotline that he is going to use from now on, actually, most of his books have a similar plotline, character-wise that is. He gives us the 'hero' in this case it is dennis the diver, this character is usually unaware of what is going on at the beginning and finally gets a clue halfway through. You also get the 'hero's' pal, this time it is the lovable gansta Robert from De-troit. Throw in the usual lack-wit, desperate for a dime bad guys, a love interest or two and stir gentle for ten minutes. But you can't forget this is leonard and he has that trademark sense of humor, pacing, and his ear for dialogue. if you like leonard, just go out and buy it, you won't be let down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A grey kitten jumps into the basket with the baby, purring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He walked in with a quiver
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She sighed and closed her eyes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im bored.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im quitting. Plz dont ask why.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
W