Twitterville: How Businesses Can Thrive in the New Global Neighborhoods

Twitterville: How Businesses Can Thrive in the New Global Neighborhoods

by Shel Israel

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101136348
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/03/2009
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
File size: 416 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Shel Israel is a social media journalist and public speaker. He has contributed to FastCompany.com, BusinessWeek.com, and the Dow Jones Company. He is the coauthor with Robert Scoble of Naked Conversations: How Blogs Are Changing the Way Businesses Talk with Customers and author of The Conversational Corporation, a Dow Jones eBook.

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Twitterville: How Businesses Can Thrive in the New Global Neighborhoods 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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ChuckBrooksAtFutureWare More than 1 year ago
Twitter was an accidental tool built to solve an internal business problem. It took a while for the builders to realize that it was really a business tool that other businesses could use. Here are some specific real world examples of how that is done. At first glance, it is hard to see how a business transaction can even get started with no more than 140 characters, but then google's AdWords do quite will with even less. Twitter usage does not require any secret sauce, results may vary, and there certainly isn't a well defined roadmap, but this book does show how some path finding companies are learning how to use this relatively new medium, by heavily relying on concrete examples of how specific businesses have managed to use twitter successfully. For the most part, twitter has become an adjunct to these companies' other communications methods, becoming fixtures in the marketing mix, as well as extending customer support in some cases. These mini case studies also outline the emerging rules of the road of this very public communications channel. Like the medium itself, these are based on common sense and common courtesy, resulting in a surprising self policing capability that other electronic channels lack. There is also a short history of how twitter came about, another serendipitous result of a sequence of innovations that cannot be planned or anticipated, neither individually nor collectively. The book does not have any detailed instructions on how to use twitter, or its various attributes (such as the APIs), but does present an in depth view of how others have made it part of their business, even when a specific business case may be hard to make.