Unexpected Afghans: Innovative Crochet Designs with Traditional Techniques

Unexpected Afghans: Innovative Crochet Designs with Traditional Techniques

by Robyn Chachula

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781596682993
Publisher: F+W Media
Publication date: 06/26/2012
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 194,596
Product dimensions: 8.40(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Robyn Chachula is the author of Blueprint Crochet (Interweave), Baby Blueprint Crochet (Interweave), and Mission Falls Goes Crochet. She has been published in a number of magazines, including Interweave Crochet and Crochet Today! She has appeared on Knit and Crochet Today and as a guest on Knitting Daily TV. Robyn's patterns have appeared in books, including Interweave Presents Crochet Gifts , Sensual Crochet , Not Your Mamma's Crochet , Catwalk Crochet , Vogue on the Go: Crocheted Shawls , Crochet Me , and Stitch & Bitch: Men. She has also designed for yarn companies, including JCA Crafts, SWTC, Mission Falls, and Artful Yarns.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

cables

The one tip I tell students in all my classes is that they will almost always be sticking their hook under both of the top loops of a crochet stitch.

Cables, however, break this rule of thumb quite dramatically. Cables are nearly always created by going around the entire post of the stitch and not those two top loops (see the Glossary for instructions for how to work post stitches). Other than that, cables are just like any other stitch pattern, and you just need to keep track of where you are in the directions. An easy trick to help you keep track of where you are: when looking at a right-side row all your front post stitches will be popping out at you, and the back post stitches will be sitting behind the top loops of the stitches they're worked around. You can easily mark off in your pattern by looking at your row to double check that you have the right post stitches where they need to be.

Do not worry if your cables do not look perfect the first time around. Cables can take a bit of time to master. The key is simply practice.

Cabled stitch patterns are unique in their three-dimensional look, but different fiber contents in your yarn can produce wildly different results. Silk and bamboo have natural drape, and while they result in a flowing fabric, that drape may hide your stitch pattern unless you drop your hook size significantly. Cotton will have great stitch definition, and your cables will seem to jump off of your fabric as in Simona Merchant-Dest's Veledílo Cable Afghan (page 32), but be careful as cotton can also make a stiff fabric. Superwash wool has always been my favorite for both stitch definition and lightweight fabric. You can see the beauty of wool in Drew Emborsky's Artesia Zigzag Afghan (page 18) and Annie Modesitt's Croises Cable Afghan (page 22).

CABLE LOVE

Cables in crochet can get a bad name when done so tightly the fabric can stand up on its own. But when executed with the right yarn and hook size, cables can be just as stunning as their knitted counterparts. I, personally, love playing with color and cables. I think cables are so special that highlighting them in a different color makes them really pop, as you can see on the Tuxedo Pillow I designed (page 12). You will have to carry one color of yarn behind your work, but it is so worth it for the effect. I find that using cables on little projects such as purses or hats really does take the project to a whole other level of beauty.

tuxedo pillow

If you're not quite feeling ready for the post stitches that make crochet cables possible, the stitch pattern in this pillow cover has you practice finding stitches to crochet around rows below the one you are working in. As an added bonus, you end up with a fancy tuxedo pattern just from making some chains and slip stitches. The ruffles pop off the fabric just like they do on fantastic retro tuxedo shirts.

MATERIALS

Yarn Worsted weight (#4 Medium).

Shown Premier Yarns, Dream (100% acrylic; 224 yd [205 m]/3.5 oz [100 g]): #24–211 Garnet (MC), 2 balls; #24–206 Grenadine (CC), 1 ball.

Hook K/10.5 (6.5 mm) or size needed to obtain gauge.

Notions Yarn needle for weaving in ends, blocking pins and steam iron, 12" (30.5 cm) pillow form (cover optional), 12" (30.5 cm) matching zipper, sewing needle, and matching sewing thread.

GAUGE

13 sts and 14 rows = 4" × 4" (10 × 10 cm) in sc.

FINISHED SIZE

12" × 12" (30.5 × 30.5 cm).

NOTES

To change color, complete last st of first color with next color.

pattern

FRONT

With MC, ch 39.

ROW 1 (WS): Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across, turn — 38 sc.

ROWS 2–3: Ch 1, sc in each sc across, turn.

ROW 4: Ch 1, sc in next 15 sc, change to CC, *ch 4, sl st around post of next sc 3 rows below, turn, [sc, 4 hdc, sc] in ch-4 sp just made (ruffle made), turn, sk next sc on current row (behind ruffle), sc in next sc; rep from * 3 times, change to MC, sc in each rem sc to end, turn — 30 sc + 4 ruffles.

ROW 5: Ch 1, sc in next 16 sc, *sc in ch-sp of ruffle, sc in next sc; rep from * 3 times, sc in each sc to end, turn.

ROW 6: Ch 1, sc in next 15 sc, change to CC, *ch 4, sl st around post of next sc 3 rows below (behind ruffle), turn, [sc, 4 hdc, sc] in ch-4 sp just made, turn, sk next sc on current row (behind ruffle just made), sc in next sc; rep from * 3 times, change to MC, sc in each rem sc to end, turn — 30 sc + 4 ruffles.

Rep Rows 5–6 seventeen more times, rep Row 5 once more, fasten off.

BACK

With MC, ch 39.

ROW 1 (WS): Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across, turn — 38 sc.

ROW 2: Ch 1, sc in each sc across, turn.

Rep Row 2 thirty-nine more times, fasten off, and weave in loose ends.

finishing

BLOCKING AND SEAMING

Block front and back panels to 12" (30.5 cm) square, steam to set by keeping iron 1" (2.5 cm) above fabric at all times. With RS facing, using yarn needle and yarn, whipstitch 3 sides together. Turn cover right-side out. Pin zipper to open side of pillow cover. Whipstitch or backstitch zipper into opening using sewing needle and sewing thread. Insert pillow form and zip closed.

eloise baby blanket

Cables, lacy shells, and dc eyelets — some of my favorite stitch patterns to use. And they're all in this baby afghan, which is one of my "go-to" baby afghans for all my new great-nieces and great-nephews! It's easy to make it wider and longer, so I can even make it for their older brothers and sisters. Once you crochet one, I know you will quickly add it to your "go-to" patterns, also! BY MARTY MILLER

MATERIALS

Yarn Worsted weight (#4 Medium).

Shown Red Heart, Eco-Ways (70% acrylic, 30% recycled polyester; 186 yd [170 m]/4 oz [113 g]): #3522 Fern, 6 skeins.

Hook J/10 (6.00 mm) or size needed to obtain gauge.

Notions Tapestry needle for weaving in ends, spray bottle with water and straight pins for blocking, large towel for blocking.

GAUGE

1 pattern repeat (2 shells, 1 crossed-cable pattern) = 5" (12.5 cm).

7 rows in pattern = 5" (12.5 cm).

FINISHED SIZE

33" × 48" (84 × 122 cm).

NOTES

Begin by working a foundation row of dc eyelets, then work the bottom border into the eyelets, on the RS. Work the first row of the afghan into the opposite side of the eyelets, still on the RS. The rest of the afghan is worked in rows, and the upper border is added at the end. The side borders are formed as you crochet the body of the afghan.

Make the afghan wider or narrower by adding or subtracting dc eyelets at the beginning. Work more rows to make the afghan longer, fewer rows to make it shorter.

SPECIAL STITCHES

Shell (sh) (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc) in sp or st indicated.

Lacy shell (l-sh) (Dc, [ch 1, dc] 3 times) in sp or st indicated.

Dc eyelet (dc eyelet) Ch 3, dc in 3rd ch from hook, *ch 7, dc in 3rd ch from hook; rep from *.

pattern

Work 20 dc eyelets (see Special Stitches), ch 3, do not turn.

BOTTOM BORDER

Working back along the dc eyelets, over the post of each dc, sh (see Special Stitches) in each dc eyelet, do not turn, rotate piece so you are now working over the chs of the eyelet spaces.

AFGHAN

ROW 1 (RS): Ch 3, working over ch-3 of each dc eyelet, sh in first dc eyelet, l-sh (see Special Stitches) in next dc eyelet, 4 dc in next dc eyelet, *l-sh in each of next 2 dc eyelets, 4 dc in next dc eyelet; rep from * to last 2 dc eyelets, l-sh in next dc eyelet, sh in last dc eyelet, turn — 6 groups of 4 dc.

ROW 2: Ch 3, sh in ch-1 sp of first sh, l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, *fpdc around next st, sk next st, fptr around next st, fptr around last skipped st, fpdc around next st, sk next ch-1 sp**, [l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh] 2 times; rep from * across, ending last rep at **, l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, sh in ch-1 sp of last sh, turn.

ROW 3: Ch 3, sh in ch-1 sp of first sh, l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, *bptr around each of next 4 post sts, [l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh] 2 times; rep from * across, ending with bptr around each of next 4 post sts, l-sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, sh in ch-1 sp of last sh, turn.

ROWS 4–65: Rep Rows 2 and 3 thirty-one times.

ROW 66: Rep Row 2.

TOP BORDER

Ch 3, sh in ch-1 sp of first sh, sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, *sh in sp bet 2nd and 3rd post sts, sh in center ch-1 sp of each of next 2 l-sh; rep from * across, ending with sh in sp between 2nd and 3rd post sts, sh in center ch-1 sp of next l-sh, sh in ch-1 sp of last sh. Fasten off.

finishing

Weave in loose ends.

BLOCKING

Lay afghan on flat surface with towel(s) underneath. Gently straighten out edges and pin in place. Spray edges lightly with cold water. Let dry.

artesia zigzag afghan

What I love most about crochet is the possibility to fool the eye through clever stitch combinations. The cables in this afghan not only create amazing texture, but also a faux ripple effect. Worked in strips and assembled later, it's a great portable project. BY DREW EMBORSKY

MATERIALS

Yarn Worsted weight (#4 Medium).

Shown Cascade Yarns, Cascade 220 (100% Peruvian Highland Wool; 220 yd [200 m]/3.5 oz [100 g]): #7824, 9 hanks.

Hook J/10 (6.0 mm) or size needed to obtain gauge.

Notions Tapestry needle for weaving in ends; split stitch marker (sm).

GAUGE

14 hdc and 10 rows = 4" × 4" (10 × 10 cm) in stitch pattern.

FINISHED SIZE

32" × 48" (81 × 122 cm).

NOTES

Afghan is composed of three strips, seamed together lengthwise, then edged.

SPECIAL STITCHES

Cable A (cbl-a) Sk 2 sts, fpdc around next st, bpdc around 2nd skipped st, fpdc around first skipped st working in front of post st just made.

Cable B (cbl-b) Sk 1 st, fpdc around next st, hdc in skipped st working in back of post st just made.

Cable C (cbl-c) Sk 1 st, fpdc around next st, fpdc around skipped st working in front of post st just made.

Cable D (cbl-d) Sk 1 st, hdc in next st, fpdc around skipped st working in front of hdc just made.

pattern

STRIP (make 3) Ch 38.

ROW 1: Dc in 4th ch from hook and in each ch across, turn — 36 dc.

ROW 2 (RS): Ch 2 (counts as first st here and throughout patt), cbl-a (see Special Stitches for this and all cables), cbl-b 6 times, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d 6 times, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 3 AND ALL ODD NUMBERED ROWS OF STRIP:Ch 2, as you work across row fpdc around all post sts facing you, bpdc around all post sts away from you, and hdc in all hdc; hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 4: Ch 2, cbl-a, cbl-b 5 times, hdc in next 2 sts, cbl-c 2 times, hdc in next 2 sts, cbl-d 5 times, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 6: Ch 2, cbl-a, cbl-b 4 times, hdc in next 4 sts, cbl-c 2 times, hdc in next 4 sts, cbl-d 4 times, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 8: Ch 2, cbl-a, cbl-b 3 times, hdc in next 6 sts, cbl-c 2 times, hdc in next 6 sts, cbl-d 3 times, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 10: Ch 2, cbl-a, cbl-b 2 times, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-c 2 times, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-d 2 times, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 12: Ch 2, cbl-a, cbl-b, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-b, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-d, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 14: Ch 2, cbl-a, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-b 2 times, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d 2 times, hdc in next 8 sts, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 16: Ch 2, cbl-a, hdc in next 6 sts, cbl-b 3 times, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d 3 times, hdc in next 6 sts, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 18: Ch 2, cbl-a, hdc in next 4 sts, cbl-b 4 times, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d 4 times, hdc in next 4 sts, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

ROW 20: Ch 2, cbl-a, hdc in next 2 sts, cbl-b 5 times, cbl-c 2 times, cbl-d 5 times, hdc in next 2 sts, cbl-a, hdc in last st, turn.

Rep Rows 2–21 four more times.

Rep Rows 2–13 once more. Fasten off.

finishing

SEAMING

With RS facing, whipstitch first strip to second strip lengthwise being sure to carefully match up rows. Seam third strip to second strip in same fashion.

EDGING

RND 1: Attach yarn with sl st to last st of top edge of project, ch 3 (counts as first dc), 2 dc in same st; working down side of project into ends of rows, 3 dc in end of first row, [sk 1 row, 3 dc in end of next row] across, 6 dc in base of first st of foundation ch, [sk 2 sts, 3 dc in next st] across, 6 dc in last st of foundation ch; working up side of project into ends of rows, 3 dc in end of first row, [sk 1 row, 3 dc in end of next row] across, 6 dc in top of first st of last row, [sk 2 sts, 3 dc in next st] across, work 3 more dc in same st as beg 3 dc, do not join, use sm to indicate last st of each rnd — 564 dc.

RND 2: 3 fpdc around center st of each 3-st group around — 564 fpdc.

RND 3: 5 fpdc around center st of each 3-st group around, sl st in beg dc to join — 940 fpdc.

Fasten off and weave in loose ends.

Spray or wet-block (see Glossary).

croises cable afghan

Knitting is where my heart lies, but my soul is consumed with crochet. I find the dimensional aspect of crochet so intriguing that it constantly inspires me. In the case of this afghan, the inspiration was a knitted piece, but I find the crocheted cables more fun to work than knitted ones — they're relatively simple and very engaging. This is a great chance to perfect your crocheted cable technique before you move on to a more complex fitted shape. BY ANNIE MODESITT

MATERIALS

Yarn Sportweight (#3 Light).

Shown Brown Sheep Company, Lamb's Pride Superwash Sport (100% washable wool; 180 yd [165 m]/ 1.75 oz [50 g]): #SW16 Sea Foam, 19 balls.

Hooks G/6 (4 mm) and H/8 (5 mm) or hooks needed to obtain gauge.

Notions Tapestry needle for weaving in ends.

GAUGE

With larger hook, 12 sts and 12 rows = 4" × 4" (10 × 10 cm) in stitch pattern.

FINISHED SIZE

50" × 48" (127 × 122 cm).

NOTE

Skip one st behind each post st worked unless directed otherwise.

SPECIAL STITCHES

C2L Sk next st, fptr around next st 2 rows below, fptr around skipped st 2 rows below.

C4L Sk next 2 sts, fptr around next 2 sts 2 rows below, fptr around 2 skipped sts 2 rows below.

pattern

With larger hook, ch 126.

ROW 1 (RS): Hdc in 3rd ch from hook (2 skipped chs count as hdc) and in each ch across, turn — 125 hdc.

ROW 2: Ch 2, hdc in each hdc across, turn.

ROW 3: Ch 3, hdc in next 3 hdc, *fptr around next 4 post sts 2 rows below, hdc in next 4 sts in current row; rep from * across, turn.

ROW 4: Ch 2, hdc in each st across, turn.

ROWS 5–6: Rep Rows 3–4.

ROW 7: Ch 2, hdc in next 3 sts, *C4L (see Special Stitches) over next 4 sts, hdc in next 4 sts; rep from * across, turn.

ROW 8: Rep Row 4.

ROWS 9–14: Rep Rows 3–8.

ROW 15: Ch 2, hdc in next 2 hdc, *fptr around next 2 post sts 2 rows below, sk 2 hdc, hdc in next 2 hdc; rep from * across to t-ch, hdc in top of t-ch, turn.

ROW 16: Rep Row 4.

ROW 17: Ch 2, hdc in next hdc, *fptr around next 2 fptr 2 rows below, sk 2 hdc, hdc in next 4 hdc, fptr around next 2 fptr 2 rows below; rep from * across, hdc in last 2 sts, turn.

ROW 18: Rep Row 4.

ROW 19: Ch 2, hdc in next hdc, C2L (see Special Stitches) over next 2 sts, *hdc in next 4 hdc, C4L over next 4 sts; rep from * to last 8 sts, hdc in next 4 hdc, C2L over next 2 sts, hdc in last 2 sts, turn.

ROW 20: Rep Row 4.

ROW 21: Ch 2, hdc in next hdc, fptr around next 2 post sts 2 rows below, *hdc in next 4 hdc, fptr around next 4 post sts 2 rows below; rep from * to last 8 sts, hdc in next 4 hdc, fptr around next 2 post sts 2 rows below, hdc in last 2 sts, turn.

ROW 22: Rep Row 4.

ROWS 23–24: Rep Rows 21–22.

ROWS 25–26: Rep Rows 19–20.

ROWS 27–32 Rep Rows 21–26.

ROWS 33–34: Rep Rows 15–16.

ROW 35: Ch 2, hdc in next 3 hdc, *fptr in next 4 tr 2 rows below, sk 4 hdc behind post sts just made, hdc in next 4 hdc, rep from * across, turn.

ROW 36: Rep Row 4.

ROWS 37–38: Rep Rows 7–8.

Rep Rows 3–38 two more times, rep Rows 3–12 once more, change to smaller hook.

finishing

EDGING

RND 1: With smaller hook, ch 2 (counts as hdc here and throughout), *hdc in each st across to next corner, (hdc, ch 3, hdc) in corner st, hdc in each row-end st to next corner, (hdc, ch 3, hdc) in corner st, rep from * once, sl st in top of beg ch-2 to join — 494 hdc, four ch-3 lps.

RND 2: NOTE: Backmost lps are located directly under the top 2 lps of the st, on the side of the work facing away from you. This is not the same as the back loop of the st. Ch 2, working in backmost lps of sts, *hdc of each hdc around, working 3 hdc in each corner ch-3 sp, sl st in top of beg ch-2 to join — 506 hdc.

RNDS 3–5: Ch 2, working in backmost lps of sts, *hdc in each hdc around, working 3 hdc in each corner hdc, sl st in top of beg ch-2 to join.

RNDS 6–7: Ch 2, working in top 2 lps of sts, *hdc in each hdc around, working 3 hdc in each corner hdc, sl st in top of beg ch-2 to join.

RND 8: Rep Rnd 2.

RND 9: Ch 2, working in front lps of sts, *hdc in each hdc around, working 3 hdc in each corner hdc, sl st in top of beg ch-2 to join.

RNDS 10–13: Rep Rnd 2.

RND 14: Rep Rnd 6 — 602 hdc.

Block as desired. Weave in loose ends.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "Unexpected Afghans"
by .
Copyright © 2012 Robyn Chachula.
Excerpted by permission of Interweave Press LLC.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents


Introduction
Expert Advice for Beginners
First Timers Do Tell

Cables
Tuxedo Pillow and Cable Tips
Eloise Baby Afghan By Marty Miller
Artesia Zig Zag Afghan By Drew Emborsky
Croises Cable Afghan By Annie Modesitt
Vika Afghan By Jill Wright
Veledilo Cable Afghan By Simona Merchant-Dest

Granny Motifs
Hatsukoi Pillow and Granny Motif Tips
Dots and Poppies Baby Blanket By Linda Permann
Peacock Afghan By Ellen Gormley
Mod Retro Afghan By Edie Eckman
Cabine de Dentelle Afghan By Annette Petavy
Kaleidoscope Afghan By Tammy Hildebrand

Color
Elan Waves Pillow and Color Tips
Peerie Baby Blanket By Kathryn Merrick
Behrens Color Block Afghan By Leigh Radford
Desert Sunrise Afghan By Carol Ventura
Moroccan Circles By Kimberly McAlindin
Bethlehem Star Afghan By Mary Beth Temple

Lace
Vigne Pillow and Lace Tips
Amada Baby Blanket By Tracie Barrett
Sunken Treasure Afghan By Kristin Omdahl
Damask Lace Afghan By Marlaina Bird
Exploded Pineapple Afghan By Doris Chan

Tunisian
Nauha Pillow and Tunisian Tips
Smocked Elegance Baby Afghan By Darla Fanton
Mission Cabled Afghan By Diane Halpern
Aryanah Sampler Afghan By Dora Ohrenstein
Van Gogh Waves Afghan By Kim Guzman
Starburst Entrelac Afghan By Megan Granholm

bios
glossary
resources
index

Customer Reviews

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Unexpected Afghans: Innovative Crochet Designs with Traditional Techniques 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I received my copy yesterday. The photos are wonderful. The patterns seem well written. Variety of techniques are covered. I am looking forward to starting one of the projects today... just need to figure out which one... they are all so beautiful.
Mag61 More than 1 year ago
I am always looking for new crochet ideas and this book has a lot of patterns that are very interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am looking forward to trying some of the afghans and techniques (especially those which are new to me) It is enjoyable to read the story behind each afghan and the creator's views about crocheting them. Many beautiful colors and designs - explanations of techniques look to be detailed - can't wait to have time to try one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unnecessary to ever purchase another afghan crochet book. This book exceeds all expectations.
TextileWiz1 More than 1 year ago
It was a bit disappointing for me as the patterns were uninspired, not creative at all. I taught crochet for many years (beginners to Master level), and I can honestly say that most of the afghans patterns I designed were by far more creative and beautiful (I have the blue ribbons to prove it). I don't think I feel this way because I'm 'jaded' from of my level of expertise, I don't know what else to say other than to pass this one by. Unless you see it at a yardsale for cheap...  I will look for some other book to replace this. Goodluck!