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Utterly Otterly Night
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Utterly Otterly Night

4.0 1
by Mary Casanova, Ard Hoyt (Illustrator)
 

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Little Otter is ready for some action! Rustling leaves call to him. Sweet, spicy air beckons. The moon is as huge and golden as Owl’s eyes. So Little Otter sets off for some fun. But with wolves on the prowl, Little Otter’s adventures are a series of dizzying close calls. When he finally returns to his den, Little Otter’s family is all played out

Overview

Little Otter is ready for some action! Rustling leaves call to him. Sweet, spicy air beckons. The moon is as huge and golden as Owl’s eyes. So Little Otter sets off for some fun. But with wolves on the prowl, Little Otter’s adventures are a series of dizzying close calls. When he finally returns to his den, Little Otter’s family is all played out and ready for bed!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this follow-up to Utterly Otterly Day, Little Otter and his family pop through the frozen ice and slide down snowy hills under moonlight. Casanova’s gently cadenced verse mimics the otters’ movements: “Up and down, the otters play./ They glide and slide,/ in a whooshily, shooshily way.” Little Otter encounters other animals as he plays, including a rabbit, owl, and moose. But atop a high hill, he smells trouble: a pack of wolves. Hoyt’s matte pen-and-ink illustrations create contrast between the smiling, rosy-cheeked otters and the chilly blue of the wild landscape; Little Otter’s tense escape will leave readers relieved by his family’s safe return. Ages 3�6. (Nov.)
Children's Literature - Lois Rubin Gross
We last met Little Otter as he tested the limits of his independence in Utterly Otterly Day. Now he is back for another excursion into the big world because he is a "big otter now." Hoyt's watercolor-rendered cartoonish otter looks as joyful as any four-year-old, slipping and sliding in the cold, wintery landscape and meeting new obstacles in the form of a towering moose and a pack of yellow-eyed wolves. Little Otter remembers his responsibility to warn the rest of the otter family of the danger of the wolf predators, and he does so with a loud screech so that the otter clan gives the wolves a literal slip. Little Otter is utterly winning with his huge, round eyes and goofy grin. The words in the book are a festival of onomatopoeia as Little Otter frisks, whooshes, whizzes and glides through the book. His actions reflect the energy of the words and the charming rhymes are well-matched to the illustrations. This is a darling, spritely marriage of words and pictures that are just right for a preschool audience. Share Little Otter with children who love Anna Dewdney's Llama Llama books, and expect the same demand for more and more of Little Otter. Reviewer: Lois Rubin Gross
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—In this second "Otterly" book, Little Otter urges his family out of their snow-covered den for some nighttime fun. As he zooms down the hills, he encounters a rabbit, plows under the snow beneath the reach of an owl, and even stops short of a towering moose's hooves. But since he is a "big otter now," he knows danger when he smells it. Sure enough, five wolves "[peer] out from piney shadows,/big teeth...big eyes…" looking hungrily right at him. "Heart bump-bumping," Little Otter zigzags away to divert them from his family while he screams a warning. Of course, everyone makes it back to the den safely, and "all is right" on this "icily, dicily/…frightfully, delightfully,/utterly otterly night." Youngsters will enjoy the irony of the parents' initial warning to be alert to danger while it is left to the youngest family member to save everyone, and they will love repeating the delicious fabricated rhyming words, even though the inconsistent rhyme scheme may challenge adults reading aloud. The pen-and-ink cartoon illustrations, mostly spreads, depict a chubby-cheeked, grinning otter family playfully cavorting in their winter habitat. Watercolor washes, swirling lines, and cross-hatching convey the joyous, nonstop energy of the animals until a close-up of Little Otter, head raised, mouth wide open as he cries, "Danger!" heralds his life-and-death flight from the wolves' grasp. Betty Tatham's Baby Sea Otter (Holt, 2005) offers some factual information about these utterly adorable creatures.—Marianne Saccardi, formerly at Norwalk Community College, CT
Kirkus Reviews
Proving to both his family and himself that he is finally big enough, Little Otter faces down danger and saves his family in this satisfying follow-up to Casanova's Utterly Otterly Day (2008). On a moonlit night in snowy winter, the otter family pops out from its holt to play in an "utterly, otterly way." This consists of belly slides down slippery hills, and the delight on their faces makes it likely that readers will itch to imitate them. But the members of the otter family are not the only creatures about. Papa warns of a hunting owl, and another time, Little Otter barely halts one of his wild rides in time to avoid a collision with huge Moose. But it is at the top of the steepest hill yet that Little Otter gets his own first sense of danger: Five wolves are on the prowl. Scared though he is, Little Otter knows what he must do, and he bravely sets about distracting the wolves, warning his family and narrowly evading teeth and claws. Hoyt's pen-and-ink illustrations wonderfully convey the playfulness and innocence of Little Otter, his every emotion worn on his sleeve. Casanova's onomatopoeic phrases punctuate the action with infectious glee: "Up and down, the otters play. / They glide and slide, / in a whooshily, shooshily way." A note for parents: Duct tape works well to repair holes torn in snow pants by otter sliding; after reading this book you may need a couple rolls. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416975625
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
11/01/2011
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,288,356
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 11.24(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Ard Hoyt has illustrated a number of books, including the New York Times bestsellers I’m a Manatee by John Lithgow and The Hair of Zoe Fleefenbacher Goes to School by Laurie Halse Anderson. Ard lives with his wife and five daughters in Bentonville, Arkansas.

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Utterly Otterly Night 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book should bring smiles to children's faces. It is a simple tale with joy, excitement, danger and a happy ending.