Woodcuts of Women: Stories / Edition 1

Woodcuts of Women: Stories / Edition 1

by Dagoberto Gilb
5.0 1
ISBN-10:
0802138748
ISBN-13:
2900802138742
Pub. Date:
01/28/2002
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Select a Purchase Option (Reprint)
  • purchase options

    Temporarily Out of Stock Online

    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.
  • purchase options
    $6.66 $12.00 Save 44% Current price is $6.66, Original price is $12. You Save 44%.
    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Woodcuts of Women: Stories 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dagoberto Gilb's 'Woodcuts of Women' is one of the most honest, entertaining, well-crafted short story collections about love and lust that I've read in a long while. Gilb doesn't spare us when he allows his male characters to delve deeply into their obsessions with the opposite sex. In 'Maria de Covina,' the first story in the collection, a young Chicano (nineteen but he thinks he passes for twenty) simply tells us: 'This is the thing: I like women. No, wait. I love women.' In 'The Pillows,' the male protagonist, Jorge, thinks he figured out why his pocho friend, Danny, is having women problems: the only pillows he owns are old, raggedy and dirty. Jorge is obsessed about this particularly while housesitting for Danny. Jorge tells his own girlfriend: 'I can't imagine a woman getting in a bed with those pillows. I can't imagine a woman wanting to, even to take a nap.' Some of the stories are heartbreaking, like 'Shout,' where poverty pushes a man to be abusive to his wife and children; even here, there is a glimmer of hope, hope based on love of women. Gilb is a master at ambiguities, our ambiguities as people searching for companionship. The only bad thing about this book is that it is too short (a mere 167 pages). Much praise is also due to the artist, Artemio Rodriguez, who illustrated each story with linocuts (similar to woodcuts); these illustrations capture the wonder, danger and craziness of loving women too much.