Writing and Law in Late Imperial China: Crime, Conflict, and Judgment

Writing and Law in Late Imperial China: Crime, Conflict, and Judgment

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780295989136
Publisher: University of Washington Press
Publication date: 02/01/2009
Series: Asian Law Series
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Robert E. Hegel is Liselotte Dieckmann Professor of Comparative Literature at Washington University in St. Louis. Katherine Carlitz is adjunct professor of Chinese literature at the University of Pittsburgh. Other contributors include Thomas Buoye, Pengsheng Chiu, Maram Epstein, Yasuhio Karasawa, Paul R. Katz, Mark McNicholas, Jonathan Ocko, James St. André, Janet Theiss, and Daniel Youd.

Table of Contents

PrefaceAbbreviations and TerminologyIntroduction: Writing and the Law / Robert E. Hegel

Part One | Rhetoric and Persuasion1. Making a Case: Characterizing the Filial Son / Maram Epstein2. Explaining the Shrew: Narratives of Spousal Violence and the Critique of Masculinity in Eighteenth-Century Criminal Cases / Janet Theiss3. Between Oral and Written Cultures: Buddhist Monks in Qing Legal Plaints / Yasuhiko Karasawa4. The Art of Persuasian in Literature and Law / Robert E. Hegel

Part Two | Legal Discourse and the Power of the State5. Filial Felons: Leniency and Legal Reasoning in Qing China / Thomas Buoye6. The Discourse on Insolvency and Negligence in Eighteenth-Century China / Pengsheng Chiu7. Poverty Tales and Statutory Politics in Mid-Qing Fraud Cases / Mark McNicholas8. Indictment Rituals and the Judicial Continuum in Late Imperial China / Paul R. Katz

Part Three | Literature and Legal Procedure9. Reading Court Cases from the Song and the Ming: Fact and Fiction, Law and Literature / James St. Andre10. Beyond Bao: Moral Ambiguity and the Law in Late Imperial Chinese Narrative Literature / Daniel M. Youd11. Genre and Justice in Late Qing China: Wu Woyao's Strange Case of Nine Murders and Its Antecedents / Katherine Carlitz

Part Four | Retrospective12. Interpretive Communities: Legal Meaning in Qing Law / Jonathan Ocko

GlossaryBibliographyContributorsIndex

What People are Saying About This

Teemu Ruskola

Writing and Law in Late Imperial China makes an important contribution to Chinese legal history. Apart from the original research on which many of the essays are based, its turn to literary methodologies in the study of law yields not only new information about late imperial law in China, but new kinds of knowledge about it.

From the Publisher

"Writing and Law in Late Imperial China makes an important contribution to Chinese legal history. Apart from the original research on which many of the essays are based, its turn to literary methodologies in the study of law yields not only new information about late imperial law in China, but new kinds of knowledge about it."—Teemu Ruskola, American University

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